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Old February 7, 2023, 11:52 AM   #1
taylorce1
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Ruger 10/22 all grown up!







I'm sorry for the bad cell phone pictures, and as you might be able to read it isn't a 10/22. I was left this carbine by a good friend that passed away, as well as a 1911. I really don't know much about these rifles, but it looks like it'll be a fun little carbine. It has a milled slot for what appears to be a Williams aperture rear sight, though I can't find any markings to such.

I'll need to find some literature to learn how to disassemble and inspect. I've also learned that cast bullets are off limits as they'll eventually lead up the gas port and make the rifle inoperable. So if anyone has experience with these .44 Mag carbines I'd love to hear about it.
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Old February 7, 2023, 12:05 PM   #2
DaleA
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My google-fu is strong this morning. You caught me between them getting me up for breakfast and putting me down for my mid-morning nap.

With half a cup of lukewarm decaffeinated coffee surging through my system I found this:

Quote:
Why did Ruger discontinue the 44 carbine?
The rifle was discontinued in 1985 due to high production costs. Ruger does not offer any parts support for the Model 44. The Ruger Model 44 was replaced by the Ruger Deerfield Carbine introduced in 2000 and produced until 2006. The Deerfield is a brand new design and has little in common with the Model 44.
Here's a list of all the Ruger manuals, even discontinued models and maybe a link to your carbine.

Good luck, hope it helps, (fading away).

General info:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruger_Model_44

All Ruger manuals:
https://ruger.com/dataProcess/serialHistory/manuals.php

Maybe your carbine, but if not, go to link above and maybe find your model.
https://ruger-docs.s3.amazonaws.com/...ls/model44.pdf
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Old February 7, 2023, 01:04 PM   #3
taylorce1
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Thanks!
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Old February 8, 2023, 06:43 PM   #4
taylorce1
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So did a little more digging and it's a 1973 by serial number and I believe an RS based on the fact it is a peep sight rifle.
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Old February 8, 2023, 10:08 PM   #5
MarkCO
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Very nice. I have a friend who is a little older than I. That is his Deer rifle. Had been since he was a kid. They are a hoot. Another friend in Arkansas as well, but he does not deer hunt much anymore.

When his magazine spring started to get a little weak, we just made him a new one, near as we could tell, from a .410 Remington Shotgun. Then, a few years later, his extractor broke. I made one from tool steel with a little time on the EDM at another buddies shop.
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Old February 8, 2023, 10:36 PM   #6
JT-AR-MG42
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I'm sure you know the .44 carbine predates the 10/22, not the other way around.

My early first year .44 did not really shoot with any load, but was mint, so down the road it went to a collector.
The one I've kept is just as you describe it.
A fun little carbine.

Shooting 240 grain soft nose jacketed with 23.5 grains of H110 gives me 50 yard 1" groups with the a Leopold Pioneer 4x.
I taper crimp the loads (for use in desert Eagles as well) and experience no set back.

I do remember thinking that Ruger should have made them in .357 as well.

JT
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Old February 8, 2023, 11:57 PM   #7
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.44

Oh yeah.....I've got two of them. One with what appears to be a walnut stock from earlier in production, the other with a birch stock produced later on. I put a Skinner peep and blade on the older carbine, the more recent one has a Leupold 1-4x. I've killed about a dozen deer with the scoped model, one with the peep. So much for my collection, now about the guns.

Ruger no longer supports that carbine, so you might want to limit how much you shoot yours. Break something and it might not be easily replaced. One reason I have two. One sometimes sees used parts from assorted sources. Although Ruger is, or at least was, known for building durable firearms, I have seen more than one of the old carbines out of service for want of an unobtainable part. I shoot mine to confirm zero and at game, period.

My pair have always been reliable with factory ammo or my reloads, accuracy has been another matter. I wish my carbines would shoot 240 gr bullets with acceptable accuracy, but they do not. I'd get 6-8" at 100 yds, barely keeping 5 rds on a paper plate. I've been all over the chart with bullet weights and have settled on the Hornady 200 gr XTP. With the 180-200 grain bullets, II routinely shoot 3" groups at 100....good enough. The carbines have a very slow twist rate, 1:38". My experience has been that the shorter lighter bullets group better in my rifles. Others report differently about their carbines, as well as Marlin and Win levers, which also are twisted slow as well, and report good accuracy results with 240 gr slugs, but that has not been the case for me. I'll add that my Dad's M94 Win in .44 mag was slow twisted also, and did not group worth a hoot with 240's either. I could not keep 265 gr slugs on a paper plate at 100 yds....forget about them. The proof that the carbine needs a faster twist rate is two fold: .44 mag revolvers, known for accuracy, have always been twisted somewhere in the neighborhood of 1:18. and when Ruger reintroduced the "new" .44 auto carbine, they twisted it 1:20. I think Henry rifles their lever carbines 1:20 as well.

I killed 2-3 deer with 180 gr XTP's, but the carbine can drive those bullets, intended for .44 spl velocities, too fast for satisfactory penetration as a game bullet due to explosive expansion in some close range cases and I quit using them. The 200 gr slug has a much higher velocity rating and is suitable for the carbine. I started getting pass through wounds with the 200 gr bullets on occasion, something that never happened with the 180's, that sometimes just fragmented on up close deer. Dead deer, but not the performance one wants. My dad shot 240's from his Winchester lever and pass throughs were the norm, but accuracy with 240's was pie plate size in his M94 as well.

The .Ruger .44 carbines are wonderful thick cover, short range hunting guns, easy to carry. with semiauto fast followups. I use mine from climbing tree stands, where their short light characteristics are also appreciated. There seems to be a real interest in the semi .44 carbine, both in the old tube feed model, and the later, box fed Ruger 99, but neither are no longer available, and used ones bring a fortune. Ruger says there is not a sufficient demand, or so I read,...... translation, insufficient profit.

In "Ruger and his Guns" whose author I cannot recall, there is a pretty good write up by one of the Ruger engineers, and comments from Bill Ruger Sr, concerning the development and testing of the original carbine. Bill Ruger took one to Africa and shot warthog and a gorilla with one, and received a ton of grief over an add/phohto promoting the carbine with the dead critter.
Seems I've read they had to disable the semi function to allow Bill to hunt with the carbine.

Long post, I hope it is satisfactory to all, I've been a fan of those little carbines for years.
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Old February 10, 2023, 01:28 AM   #8
taylorce1
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Yes, I know the .44 Carbine predates the 10/22. However, my first Ruger was a 10/22. That's why I titled it as such.

I shot a few rounds of American Eagle 240 grain JHP ammunition the other day. It's a brass slinger for sure, only managed to recover 70% of my brass from the mud and snow on the range. Shoots about 6-8" low at 50 yards. Groups were nothing to talk about as I was shooting off hand.



Recoil was like a long slow push, I was expecting something a bit quicker for sure. I felt it was pretty mild, but it is going to move you a bit. The bullets sure smack steel with authority as well.

I don't plan on shooting it a lot, maybe a deer hunt or two in Oklahoma. I'd really like to take it Black Bear hunting with dogs, I think it would shine there. Pigs would be cool as well.
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