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Old May 19, 2022, 10:34 AM   #1
fauxpa46
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Sticky problem!

My first experience with coated bullets. Every bullet becomes stuck up into the seating die. What’s the trick to stopping this? Using Lee dues in a Lee 4-hole turret.
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Old May 19, 2022, 10:53 AM   #2
Unclenick
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It's probably due to a mismatch between the shapes of your bullets and the business end of the seating ram. Many folks call Lee or whoever made the dies and get a spare seating ram, then coat a bullet in Pam or in Johnson's Paste Wax or some other mold release agent, and then fill the seating ram with JB Weld and set it on the bullet and wipe off the excess and just let it sit until it hardens, giving you a seating ram that matches the bullet shape.

I'll move this thread to the case bullet forum, where you may get more suggestions.
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Old May 19, 2022, 12:23 PM   #3
dahermit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fauxpa46 View Post
My first experience with coated bullets. Every bullet becomes stuck up into the seating die. What’s the trick to stopping this? Using Lee dues in a Lee 4-hole turret.
A picture of the offending bullets would be of help. It could be as simple as having too much powder coat on your bullets. But without pictures we just have to guess.
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Old May 19, 2022, 04:54 PM   #4
gwpercle
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unclenick View Post
It's probably due to a mismatch between the shapes of your bullets and the business end of the seating ram. Many folks call Lee or whoever made the dies and get a spare seating ram, then coat a bullet in Pam or in Johnson's Paste Wax or some other mold release agent, and then fill the seating ram with JB Weld and set it on the bullet and wipe off the excess and just let it sit until it hardens, giving you a seating ram that matches the bullet shape.

I'll move this thread to the case bullet forum, where you may get more suggestions.
What Unclenick says about custom fitting the nose punch ... you can also use
epoxy putty to make the fit ...J-B Weld sells it also , do not get fast curing putty or glue, slow curing gives you time to work ...make sure everything is set up straight and level when curing ...don't want nothing crooked .
The reason for using epoxy putty is it doesn't drip and/or run down into places you don't want it ... place a small ball of epoxy putty in the nose punch , reassemble die , install in press and seat the bullet in the press like you would normally seat a bullet ...this time there is a ball of epoxy putty in nose .... when seated , leave the round and die in the press with gentle pressure on the press handle ...everything all straight and in line and let epoxy cure .
The reason for using the press is to get everything alaigned and straight .
Gary

Last edited by gwpercle; May 19, 2022 at 05:03 PM.
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Old May 20, 2022, 08:55 PM   #5
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Gary is right that alignment is critical to straight seating. There are several ways to achieve it. One is to chuck the seating stem in a variable speed drill so you can slowly spin the stem with the seated bullet in the epoxy to look for wobble, and straighten any you observe. This method is limited by your visual acuity. You can chuck the stem in a drill press and set the bullet on its table while you lower the drill spindle to achieve full contact, and the lock the spindle into position. Another approach is to use a Lyman M-die die to create a step in a case mouth that holds the bullet upright while you use the seating die as Gary described to center the cast epoxy profile.
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Old May 21, 2022, 10:43 AM   #6
fauxpa46
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Holy crap, guys. Fortunately, I didn't have to go all through that. I believe I was not flaring/belling the cases quite enough. I didn't realize I would have to adjust the die from jacketed bullets to coated bullets.

Thank you for well-thought out answers, however.
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