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Old May 12, 2020, 07:17 PM   #26
Kreyzhorse
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It's going to be an ugly handful of gun. Not for the beginner or faint of heart.

That out of the way, it will be a fun gun to shoot for sure especially if you reload. 44 Specials are pretty tame and it's fun to shoot a cylinder or two of hot loads now and again.

Someone mentioned above that you have to let that gun roll in your hand and that is sage advice. It's not a gun you can stand up to the recoil, you have to let if roll in your hand and if you have big hands, you still may get a knuckle slap but it is what it is.

Enjoy your big bore gun, they are addictive.
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Old May 12, 2020, 08:00 PM   #27
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Thanks for all the comments again everyone.

This is the model with the square backed trigger guard.

I have read up quite a bit about people busting their knuckles with the SBH.

I don't forsee it being an issue for me, but I guess I will find out. I have size 8 hands and there is plenty of rubber from the Pachmayr grip protecting my middle finger.

You can't really find .44 Special around locally. I found a box of Remington HTP 240 grain SJHP .44 Magnum for a decent price at my local Farm and Fleet.

They were sold out of pretty much all pistol ammo except .44 Magnum and .327 Federal.

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Old May 12, 2020, 08:40 PM   #28
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Here's a tip, since this is your first, with a CORRECTLY FITTING screwdriver, check all screws before each shooting session.

There is something about the recoil of a revolver that loosens screws. Not all the time, not every time, not every screw, but sometimes, some guns, some screws. It can happen. Get in the habit of checking them. IF/when you find one that is repeatedly getting loose, a small application of the proper Loctite generally solves the problem.

You might want to consider doing that to the cylinder base pin retaining screw on your Ruger, I had that assembly unscrew and fly off for parts unknown one time, shooting a Vaquero .44 Mag. End of shooting that gun, that day. Ruger sent me new parts, no problem, and when I installed them I used "Guntite" on the threads and never had that problem again.

Quote:
I shoot it two handed. My right hand squeezes quite firmly,me left thumb cocks during recoil. I don't let it roll,I hold my grip,and because there WILL be recoil recovery,regardless, I can shoot it as fast as a double action with full power loads.
My shooting style is almost the exact opposite. I don't grip the gun very firmly, just firmly enough to ensure control. I shoot mostly one handed, sometimes using the off hand for support, but not on the gun, and I don't cock it with my off hand. I let the gun roll, as much as it will with pachmayrs. For me, its not a speed machine, its a repeater, and I don't try to keep it locked in one place the way I do for some lighter recoiling guns, like DA .38s/357s. I'm about as fast SA as I am with an equally recoiling DA, (which I almost always shoot SA anyway), for me both take about the same amount of time to aim for follow up shots. We're all different.

A friend of a friend is the kind of guy who makes a mountain gorilla look wimpy (plus he has longer thumbs ) he can shot full house .44Mag DA at a speed that wins matches. I can't.

Takes me about 7 seconds to drop 5 bowling pins, shooting "crank and yank" (SA revolver). I've done it in 5.36 seconds shooting a .44 Auto Mag, and 4.37seconds (7 pins) shooting a .357 Desert Eagle. None of those times even placed 3rd...I'm not the fastest gun out there, by a long shot. But, its fun.

I like Ruger SA's. They're just FUN to shoot. I like working the action, the way I like a standard transmission in a car that's fun to drive. Not the fastest, or most efficient out there, but then, neither am I.

Enjoy your gun, and those Rem 240s, and hang on to it, enough so it doesn't hit you in the face or you drop it. After that, how you shoot it is entirely up to you.

when you get around to reloading for it, I recommend 2400 powder. It will do well in midrange loads up to full house magnums. Lots of others will work well, too. I use 2400 in the .44 Mag and for magnum in .357 as well.

I use Unique in my .45 Colts, but I limit them to about 1100fps for my shooting pleasure and Unqiue will do that just fine, in either .44 or .45 calibers.
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Old May 13, 2020, 06:35 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by 44 AMP View Post
Just out of curiosity, does this include the hard rubber grips that have been standard on the Colt SAA for about a century or so??

I'm not going to argue with anyone's sense of style or what beauty is, or isn't. You put any grips you want on your gun. Wood, Ivory, Mother of Pearl, hard rubber, soft rubber, plastic, stag, sterling silver and turquoise, what ever floats your boat.

What Pachmayr grips say to me, is, that the shooter is serious about shooting their gun the best they can, and less so about style or "traditional" looks.
I should have said oversize rubber grips oversize wood too.I don't like the way they look I do like the way they work for shooting
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Old May 13, 2020, 07:29 AM   #30
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44AMP,

I bought my SBH in the 70's. A good friend liked lever actions,single shots,and single actions.He also cast bullets and had the best reloading room around.

We had a lot of fun.

About then,Colorado decided to allow handgun hunting. You had to qualify ,4 out of 6 shots in a 10 in bull at 50 yds.

We made up a 10 in steel dinger and pretty much beat it to death!

The practice paid off.It was rare we didn't clang the dinger 6 for 6.I never had a timer,but the tempo was at least as fast as Bullseye rapid fire.

I wasn't trying to brag about being fast.My point was,its going to bounce.During the bounce,there is plenty of time to thumb the hammer.

Sort of like a pump shotgun.
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Old May 13, 2020, 08:31 AM   #31
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My SBH is my favorite firearm.

Grip preference probably has a lot to do with shooting style.

I prefer the wooden "plowhandle" grips.

I keep my pinky curled beneath the grip. In the olden days I was taught that was the proper way to hold a SA revolver. (Also, it keeps your middle finger away from the trigger guard.) I also hold them more loosely than most handguns, and let them roll with the recoil a bit.

My FiL grips his like any other handgun. He prefers the Bisley grip frame, and would probably do well with the rubber type grips.

Different strokes for different folks.

Have fun with it!
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Old May 13, 2020, 09:45 AM   #32
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I don't forsee it being an issue for me, but I guess I will find out. I have size 8 hands and there is plenty of rubber from the Pachmayr grip protecting my middle finger.
See that little corner of the squared off trigger guard that the grips don't cover?
Wear good shooting gloves, or keep band aids handy. I know from experience.
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Old May 13, 2020, 10:07 AM   #33
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About 99% of my shooting is 44 Mag and Cast Bullets around 3/4 hundred a week .
Three years i bought a new BFR love the gun hated the grips . First day with the new BFR after less then 100 rounds my hand was a bloody mess . ( just to sharp) . I finale found some wood grips it is fixed . The SBH is still the Revolver I shoot the most .
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Old May 13, 2020, 12:22 PM   #34
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That’s a fine looking revolver!

Suggestions for accessories:

1. Belt Mountain Base Pin. While you probably don’t need it, they will tighten up your gun and are a nice little accent.

2. Shooting glove. As mentioned above, that corner of trigger guard can catch you. I just grip lower down the handle and it’s fine until I forget.

3. Bisley grip frame. Just kidding, but the Bisley frames really work for me. “Bisley” ...I know. If you are handy that exposed corner can be shaped smooth.

4. Simple single stage reloading gear. .44 Magnum is perhaps the easiest cartridge to reload. It’s like loading a little artillery shell- powder measures are large so pinpoint accuracy is not critical, the brass is easy to handle and see, lots of published load data (esp. for your exact pistol) and 100 handloads might be more than you care to light off. A basic single stage press is perfect for loading 100 carefully... no need for the bulk capabilities of a progressive press. Once you’ve done every stage by hand, you’ll understand the more complicated progressive press.

Factory ammo isn’t crazy expensive but costly enough that it feels really good to roll your own.

I have this project idea to show how to reload with only the most basic tools but will never get around to it.
1. Clean your brass with a wide mouth juice bottle, dish washing detergent and salt. Sure it takes a lot of shaking and time and drying is time and bother but it works for free.
2. Lee dies and baby single stage press
3. Priming tool... my old lee tool has been discontinued so I’m not sure about that one
4. Lee powder dippers. For range ammo, I trust measuring by volume
4. Store the ammo in repurposed corsage cheese containers.

Once going, you can appreciate every upgrade to your reloading gear.
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Old May 13, 2020, 04:29 PM   #35
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2. Lee dies and baby single stage press
I agree but I say don't buy Lee. They do work, not disputing that, but Lee is bare bones bottom line cheap. Lee dies (and I have a couple sets) don't have the features I like, it's a personal matter. Dies (and a press) are things most of us only buy ONCE. Lee is a few $ cheaper, it's up to you to decide. I use Lyman dies bought in the 70s when I lived in the east, and RCBS since I moved to the west in the 80s.

Quote:
4. Store the ammo in repurposed corsage cheese containers.
I disagree with this. First off, I don't eat corsage cheese (autocorrect??) and cottage cheese tubs are not a real good choice, either.

The ammo you buy comes in a box. USE that box for the empties, and for reloaded ammo, as long as it lasts. This keeps things orderly, identified, and counted. Fine to put a label on the ammo box telling what load is in it. But use an ammo box.

Eventually, you will probably reach the point where you have more brass/ammo than boxes, if so, get more boxes, good sturdy plastic ones don't cost a lot, and MTM boxes will last decades or longer. Mine have.

Storing in a tub, coffee can or even heavy baggies is fine for bulk unprocessed empties, but for loaded rounds boxes are better, for one thing, you get a count of how many are there at a glance. Full box, you see it, right away. Also lets you put fired cases from that box back in that box, keeping your brass grouped together.

.44 Mag ammo is HEAVY. Light, flimsy containers can only hold small amounts. Even one box of loaded ammo might cause a "Corsage cheese" tub to pop open when you pick it up or move it. Two boxes almost certainly will. For that, coffee cans are better.

Best is MTM ammo boxes and when you get a few filled, a GI ammo can is the ultimate in safe, secure storage. They aren't as cheap as they used to be, but get one or more in good condition, seal intact, and they're about indestructible, stay shut and have a good STURDY handle.

Just don't put more in them than you can safely lift! I had to limit myself to the 50 cal cans (or the smaller .30 cal ones) after throwing my back out trying to lift a crate that "only" had 800 rnds of .44 Mag in it (and being filled the rest of the way with .22LR )

You can even paint GI cans any way you want. I usually don't, I just put a caliber label on them. You can make them pink with flower stickers if you want, what ever you want. I would recommend against camoflage, though.

Simply because you can lose them in the weeds..
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Old May 13, 2020, 05:24 PM   #36
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You make excellent points but my intent was: “reloading doesn’t need to be a large initial outlay of cash” and any results, built with reasonable attention to detail, will be at least as good as factory ammunition.

Since I don’t buy factory ammo for .44, the only box I have is the one my dad gave me 20 years ago, still full of factory ammo. Starline brass for me and those plastic boxes to store 50 rounds are deluxe... but 50 rounds go in to a ziplock bag or little plastic food container, too. If I was going to load a bunch up to store, I’d probably use Tupperware and use more and smaller containers.

I bought some dies that literally cost twice as much as my Lee pistol Ti dies and I could not detect any difference except having to buy a Lee factory crimp die anyhow and not as part of the 4 die deal.

Vibratory tumbler? Rotating drum? Great stuff... but you can do good enough with a wide mouth bottle and time and fussing to make sure it’s all dry before starting. But it’s an expense that can be delayed. Like a beam scale and adj powder thrower.

For a little extra money, you’re right. There are better tools for each task. But that’s a little extra for lots of tasks. The question is really “how much is just enough to make good ammunition when my time is not money but enjoying the task.”
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Old May 13, 2020, 06:49 PM   #37
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Most people do not care how you keep you ammo . I on the other hand am just happy you Reload .
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Old May 13, 2020, 10:56 PM   #38
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StinkyPete.

Thanks for the reloading info. I actually have a basic reloading setup, manuals, etc. Just never reloaded for .44 Magnum.

I have pretty much a bare bones set up. Some type of hand operated press made by Lee. Wife bought me it for Christmas as a kit with 9mm dies back when 9mm was always out of stock.

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Old May 13, 2020, 11:48 PM   #39
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I have pretty much a bare bones set up. Some type of hand operated press made by Lee. Wife bought me it for Christmas as a kit with 9mm dies back when 9mm was always out of stock.
Sounds good. Now you just need to learn the complexities of the roll crimp, and how and why revolvers act like bullet pullers.

The process is the opposite but the result is like the kinetic (hammer) type bullet pullers.

.44 Mag is heavy bullets and heavy recoil, and that ammo needs a heavy crimp. (additionally, some slow powder need a heavy crimp for best ignition)

The common term is "crimp jump" but some also call it bullet creep. What it is, is inertia. Since the rounds in the cylinder are held at the rear by the rim, when the gun recoils, that backward force literally tries to pull the case off the bullet, which wants to stay where it is, due to inertia. Bullets can "walk forward" during recoil and even stick out the front of the cylinder, which ties up the gun.

The 9mm uses a taper crimp, to keep the bullet in place during the feeding cycle, and so that the case mouth has a square "edge" to headspace with.

Revolver don't need that case mouth edge for headspacing, so the case can be roll crimped into the crimping groove.

The next question is (usually) "how much crimp do you need?" and the answer is "enough to keep the bullet in place during recoil".

When you go to adjust your seating die to crimp (or separate crimp die if that's what you use) a good place to start is a factory loaded round.

Adjust the die body to contact the crimp of the factory round. (firm contact, don't crank on it) and that's a good place to start. You make adjustments (if any) after shooting some rounds loaded at that setting. Load up and shoot 5 and then look at #6. If the bullet has moved forward any, you need to adjust the amount of crimp a SMALL amount more. Repeat until the bullet no longer moves, and call it good.

Be aware that, unlike the taper crimp, a roll crimp if not done right (everything properly lined up case mouth and groove) the crimp can buckle or bulge the case, even to the point where it won't chamber.

If you are going to use a Lee factory crimp die, ignore my instructions (which are for regular dies). I don't use the FCD, don't know exactly how it works, so if you're using that, you'll need someone else to tell you tips and trick with it.

There's a bit more to it, but we have a reloading forum for more specific Q&A. Do feel free to ask there when you need answers about reloading.
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Old May 14, 2020, 02:17 AM   #40
HiBC
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Learning roll crimp:

You won't get consistent crimps without consistent case lengths.

You might not have to worry about that initially if you buy,for example,250 Starline new brass. Anyway,your calipers will tell you.

Note revolver bullets have a crimp groove or knurled cannelure.

The seater stem must be adjusted seat the bulet so that most of the crimp groove is inside the case mouth,but you can still see some crimp groove.Maybe .010 or .015.

The actual degree of crimp is controlled by how far you screw the die body in.

IMO,there is an entry level technique,and an advanced technique.

Start with the die about a nickel thickness off the shell holder.You want the seater stem set to not quite seat the bullets full depth.As yu screw the die body down for more crimp,you may have to back the seater stem off a bit.

Nowyou will creep the die down a little at a time,observing the bell on the case mouth disappear. As you creep the die down,the bullet is getting seated deeper.

You want the bullet to be seated to the right depth relative to the bell disappearing ,all at the same time.For the beginner,lock it down and seat them
You want the bullets seated to proper depth,the bell ironed out,but you aren't crimping yet.. Then back off your seater stem,and creep the die body down so you get a good,strong crimp without the seater stem pushing the bullet any deeper...because you backed it ff.

That makes crimping a separate step,but you have a little easier setup.

Once you are comfortable with getting a good crimp that way,

You can master the advanced technique.The two adjustments have to come together at once,and you have to "Lead it" a bit. You leave just a bit more of the crimp groove showing when you lock the seater spindle,just as the bell disappears. Hopefully,as you screw the die body down for more crimp,the seating depth will come into just right.If not,once you get your desired crimp,make a small adjustment to your seater stem.

Last edited by HiBC; May 14, 2020 at 02:26 AM.
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Old May 14, 2020, 04:48 AM   #41
darkgael
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I have a .44 SBH, 5.5” bbl, Pachmayr grips. It is my favorite revolver....maybe my favorite pistol.
The grips do not grab the skin on my hand..
I load my own ammo for it. Some years ago, a friend of mine passed away...he loved the .44 magnum amd loaded his own ammo. His widow gave his “stuff” to me. There was a lot of stuff....l have not had to buy .429 bullets in the last decade. Mostly 240 grainers, they make up my standard load. I am partial to Alliant 2400 as opposed to the ubiquitous W296/H110.
Have fun with the new gun.
Pete
PS: about dies...fwiw....i have die sets from every manufacturer that i know of. The .44 dies in my Dillon 550B are Lee dies. I do not find them any less useful or effective than any other die set.
P
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Old May 14, 2020, 04:01 PM   #42
Hanshi
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I'm a fan of the Super BlackHawk. Mine is the OM and completely stock. I have small hands and the factory grips are comfortable and make shooting a pleasure.
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Old May 15, 2020, 01:52 PM   #43
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My .44Mag SBH (non-dragoon style grip) and flattop 50th have wood grips. No rubber will touch my Single Actions.... Just prefer classic wood grips. Also I don't shoot anything over 1200fps, so recoil is fairly tame. My normal loads are 1100fps (240g SWC bullet). Just enough you know it isn't a .44 Special, yet still be able to shoot all day. Also the loads will do what needs doing in almost all situations I would ever likely run into, so no need for more blast and noise.
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Old May 15, 2020, 03:01 PM   #44
KEYBEAR
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rclark You have the a Small Grip Frame like the looks but can,t shoot it .
All my SBH have nice WOOD the only thing for a Single Action .
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Old May 15, 2020, 03:26 PM   #45
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As strange as it may sound my very first handgun was a SBH. I went with Rubber grips and felt they worked very well. Like any gun and any individual there may be a certain "art" to shooting the gun enjoyably. My recommendation review all these posts and then shoot the gun to determine what works for you.
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Old May 15, 2020, 05:56 PM   #46
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The finish , porting and shortened barrel point to Mag-na-port Custom Work , if so the Mag-na-port will help a good deal with recoil . They do work and work well .
Nice little rig you have , it should be fun shooting .
Save you brass and work up a nice reload for it ...the 44 Magnum takes to reloading and cast SWC's like a duck to water
Gary
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Old May 15, 2020, 07:25 PM   #47
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gwpercle I have two Rugers with 4.5/8 barrels One a Predator And also a Tomahawk .
Both are Mag-Na-Port ported I do shoot the Predator some I would give $200 bucks to have a new barrel put on it (with no porting) I hate it .
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Old May 15, 2020, 08:37 PM   #48
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This one shoots nice....
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg B59B2528-93B1-4010-AB8D-8193C7E5BB8D.jpeg (518.4 KB, 25 views)
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Old May 15, 2020, 09:22 PM   #49
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Quote:
No rubber will touch my Single Actions....
Love it!!!
Can I steal that for my rules of gun ownership #2?
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Old May 16, 2020, 12:28 AM   #50
44 AMP
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You put what ever grips you want on your gun, and I'll do the same on mine. There is no wrong, if it does what you want.

It does amaze me the style snobbery one finds in the gun world. I will admit to a degree of it, myself. Each of us is different. One wants no rubber on their SA, another says no scope on their lever gun....I don't like the look of rails and a collapsible buttstock on a lever gun, but I won't tell you that you shouldn't do it, it just means I'm not doing it, or buying one.

I might think your wife is pretty as a mud fence, but I won't tell you that you shouldn't have married her...
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