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Old February 26, 2024, 12:24 AM   #1
rc
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My Smith 629 Locked Up... Dohhh

Well, I had just put a new set of grips on my 629 and loaded it up and ran 6 rounds through it. When I went to open the cylinder the front latch was sticking and I had to use a lot of extra force on the crane to open it. After looking at my 686 and rubbing a file on the front of the ejector rod I tried it again and the same thing occurred. Then I realized something may have unscrewed and I started playing with it. I discovered the ejector rod had come loose and unscrewed a bit from the cylinder. Once I threaded it back (left hand thread) I closed the revolver and it locked up fine and opened normally. I took it out and fired a couple of cylinders worth of ammo and all seems to be good again! This is not something that has ever happened with the 686.
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Old February 26, 2024, 01:36 AM   #2
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Quote:
After looking at my 686 and rubbing a file on the front of the ejector rod I tried it again and the same thing occurred.
This makes me shudder...

Put the files away, and unscrew the ejector rod shroud. Degrease the threads and then use a TINY drop of a NON PERMANENT threadlocker. (I recommend the product called "Guntite")

reassemble the gun and let it sit overnight. The rod will not unscrew again, until you unscrew it.

It can happen with any gun screw, usually doesn't, but it can. Revolvers are notorious for "vibrating" screws loose.
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Old February 26, 2024, 08:58 AM   #3
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Just as a bit of personal experience with an all-steel J frame, I'd fitted a new locking bolt to tighten up the lockup of the yoke. Worked great for a $5 part and a little sanding time. After a test shooting session I cleaned it and noticed the cylinder was turning hard in a few spots. I thought that's weird and not great. Come to find a tiny little sliver of copper brush strand had gotten under the ejector while cleaning. I removed it and all was well again.

Moral of the story is inspect, clean, inspect again, if you must file do so on new spare parts only, cheapest first, and only after correctly diagnosing the problem
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Old February 26, 2024, 04:38 PM   #4
jetinteriorguy
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The only malfunctions I’ve ever experienced in 40 years of shooting revolvers have been an ejector rod coming unscrewed in my Mosel 57, and junk under the ejector in any of my revolvers. Every time I go shooting I check both of these things and have never had any issues since. Just basic care and maintenance eliminates these issues.
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Old February 27, 2024, 02:49 PM   #5
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Assuming that you were shooting full-power .44 Magnum ammo, your 629 generates a lot more recoil than your 686 does and this is probably why its ejector rod unscrewed while the 686 didn't. I've had ejector rods start to unscrew on a couple of S&W revolvers over the years and while I tried the oft-recommended thread locker solution, it never worked for me. What I finally wound up doing was placing empty cases in the cylinder to brace the extractor and then using a pair of pliers with padded jaws to sufficiently tighten the ejector rod. That probably wasn't the "proper" way to fix the problem, but it's what worked for me.
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Old February 27, 2024, 04:01 PM   #6
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Quote:
I tried the oft-recommended thread locker solution, it never worked for me.
This makes me curious, as to why it didn't work for you. Done correctly, I've never had it fail in over half a century of use on various guns.

I have seen threadlocker fail on some other people guns, the common reasons are failure to degrease the metal or using the wrong grade/type of threadlocker.

Also I would point out that it isn't just the force of recoil but also the degree of torque relative to the threads.
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Old February 27, 2024, 05:13 PM   #7
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Fairly common with Smith revolvers. As a rule I still prefer S&W over Ruger by a slight margin. But this is one point where Ruger is better.
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Old February 27, 2024, 08:04 PM   #8
Webleymkv
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Quote:
Originally posted by 44 AMP
This makes me curious, as to why it didn't work for you. Done correctly, I've never had it fail in over half a century of use on various guns.

I have seen threadlocker fail on some other people guns, the common reasons are failure to degrease the metal or using the wrong grade/type of threadlocker.
I don't know why it didn't work but I tried it on both blue and stainless revolvers (all of which had the threads de-greased with denatured alcohol) with both LocTite brand "blue" and Birchwood Casey brand "Gun Tite" which I suspect are one in the same.
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Old February 27, 2024, 08:48 PM   #9
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I think you needed to use a solvent based degreaser. Blue/242 LocTite should have worked perfectly, if the threads were degreased properly. LocTite also sells a primer although I don’t think it’s really necessary for this repair.
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Old February 27, 2024, 09:48 PM   #10
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Here's a tool I once saw for ejector/extractor S&W rods. I don't own one but remember it's existence should anyone want one, $21:

https://www.brownells.com/tools-clea...d-tool-for-sw/
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Old February 27, 2024, 11:30 PM   #11
rc
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So can I just unscrew the ejector rod, dab some lock tight on the threads and screw it back in? I don't want to cause hard rotation or any other issues. I also don't want something to go doink and end up in a hidden corner of the room when I unscrew the rod.

Thanks for the advice. I've never take the one off my 686 and it's never come loose on its own. This 629 was a used gun and someone may have taken it apart in the past.
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Old February 28, 2024, 05:46 AM   #12
jetinteriorguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Webleymkv View Post
I don't know why it didn't work but I tried it on both blue and stainless revolvers (all of which had the threads de-greased with denatured alcohol) with both LocTite brand "blue" and Birchwood Casey brand "Gun Tite" which I suspect are one in the same.
Alcohol isn’t the best way to degrease something. Use a good quality solvent and pay special attention in the inside threads with cotton swabs, keep using new swabs until they come out clean.
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Old February 28, 2024, 07:04 AM   #13
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Brake cleaner will work for degreasing.
DO NOT get it on a newer blued (painted) 10/22 receiver. It WILL strip the finish off.
It is okay on most other finishes and is great for cleaning bore brushes.
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Old February 28, 2024, 09:52 AM   #14
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Not unknown for S&W ejector rods requiring tightening. We were told to use 2 dummies/spent cases to protect the ratchet/star ejector when the rod is tightened. I'm "affluent" so I use three spent cases (yeah I know, not-so humble brag).
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Old March 3, 2024, 07:05 PM   #15
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Loctite has some

There is a Loctite primer, it's a potent solvent IMO. I use brake clean prior to applying Loctite. Clean and oil/grease free are the keys to make Loctite perform. Heat is your friend getting it to let go, get right above when heating, you can smell the Loctite when it is time to apply the torque. Does not take a lot of heat.
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