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Old December 7, 2009, 08:45 PM   #1
Bill Daniel
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Press longevity

I have on order a Hornady LNL Classic press and have noted that most in responce to Lillady and others have recommended Lee Cast and RCBS Rock Chucker because they are good presses and cast iron. The Hornady Press is alloy aluminum? and so my question is will I likely wear this press out or dammage it because it is not cast iron. I will be reloading 308 for target and hunting. I guess I am getting insecure because I rarely see Hornady presses mentioned on TFL.
Thanks for your input.
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Old December 7, 2009, 08:57 PM   #2
Tex S
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Quote:
will I likely wear this press out or dammage it because it is not cast iron.
Absolutely not.


Quote:
I guess I am getting insecure because I rarely see Hornady presses mentioned on TFL.
Just because your press is not the latest internet sensation does not mean it will not serve you well.

Quit worrying about the press you ordered; it is a nice piece of equipment. If I was you I would be more worried about finding some components.
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Old December 7, 2009, 09:57 PM   #3
farmall
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Like most anything, there are alot more presses damaged by abuse and neglect, than are ever worn beyond usefulness.

I have the Pacific Multi-Power, the forerunner to the LNL. Its cast or forged steel, and has been to hell and back, still good as new, except paint.

There are people out there who can break an anvil with a glass hammer!

Andy
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Old December 7, 2009, 10:01 PM   #4
Shane Tuttle
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Ditto on the above comments. Hornady and many other brands make a fine, quality product. Even if you happen to wear it out or break it, I'm sure Hornady will stand behind their product. They have with me.
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Old December 7, 2009, 10:04 PM   #5
wncchester
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"The Hornady Press is alloy aluminum? and so my question is will I likely wear this press out or dammage it because it is not cast iron."

No. Keep the ram reasonably clean and oiled and it will last a LOOOONG time.

The LiLady issue was somewhat lead by those who are blindly loyal to greeen presses because they "will last forever" but Lee presses only last a short time or some such silly notions.

Fact is. ANY press properly cared for will out last most users.
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Old December 7, 2009, 10:41 PM   #6
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"Fact is. ANY press properly cared for will out last most users."


Truer words have not been spoken!
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Old December 7, 2009, 11:07 PM   #7
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Quote:
The Hornady Press is alloy aluminum? and so my question is will I likely wear this press out or dammage it because it is not cast iron. I will be reloading 308 for target and hunting.
Quote:
"Fact is. ANY press properly cared for will out last most users."


Truer words have not been spoken!
I disagree.

I had an RCBS Partner press, for my first press. It loaded thousands of rounds of .45acp, .357 magnum, .44 magnum and even .30-30 winchester with no problems or signs of fatigue. I didn't have a dedicated reloading bench since I lived in an apartment back then. So, I "sandwiched" a board above and below my dining room table to protect the finish, then C-clamped my press and other gear in place when I wanted to use them. When done, I cleaned them down and put them away. They were well cared for.

I started loading .308 Winchester.

The .308 has a LOT more surface area than the other cartridges I listed, even .30-30 winchester. The OAL may be the same, but the diameter is much smaller and the case has more taper to it. The .308 has a lot more friction during sizing.

After a few hundred .308 cases, I snapped my RCBS Partner Press in half one day while resizing.



Not the end of the world: I ordered a replacement RockChucker, sent in the Partner under RCBS' warranty, and had 2 presses after all was said and done.

I would not suggest using an Aluminum press for rifle loading, though.
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Old December 8, 2009, 12:20 AM   #8
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"I would not suggest using an Aluminum RCBS Partner press for rifle loading, though."

Fixed that for you. LNL has a much heavier cross section than the partner.
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Old December 8, 2009, 01:58 AM   #9
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If everybody would just buy a Forster Co-Ax there would be no need for threads like this.
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Old December 8, 2009, 02:49 AM   #10
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Ditto the Co-ax. With the easy in/out dies it's the lazy man's dream and just a fun gadget to work with.
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Old December 8, 2009, 10:10 AM   #11
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"After a few hundred .308 cases, I snapped my RCBS Partner Press in half one day while resizing."

Yep, that photo shows a typical "Partner" failure. But, my comment stands, breaking that sturdy cast aluminum alloy base wasn't easy, was it?

I have a friend who's used a Partner for about 20 years, no trouble. He loads lots of rife stuff up to .338 W. He uses a good case lube, properly applied.
When things get hard, he says he has two options: Push harder or take the case out and relube it. Guess which option he follows?

Using the Tim Taylor tactic of "more power" is rarely a good option with light weight tools.

If a press is used properly, no one needs the massive strength of a Co-Ax, but I've read that some folks have enough "skill" to break them too. ??
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Old December 8, 2009, 10:20 AM   #12
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Broken presses happen, but it's not common. Any casting has the potential to have have a flaw, be it a microscopic crack or a stress riser, and once in awhile one makes it to market that way. Many also allow a user to overcam them with a die turned in too far, and that can ultimately fatigue or damage them. Just follow the instructions, keep it lubricated, use good quality case lube, and all will be well. If you think something is over-stressing the press, call customer service and ask about what you are experiencing? They will walk you through it.
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Old December 8, 2009, 12:32 PM   #13
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I had an old Lee turret press, aluminium cast as I recall, I was the third user of this press. loaded .38spl, .45ACP and 30-06. it was faithfull until I traded it for a Lee LoadMaster. I wish I hadn't, Now I have the LoadMaster, a Classic Cast turret and a Classic Cast. All serve me well. BTW the Classic Cast is not Cast iron it is cast from steel.
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Old December 8, 2009, 04:41 PM   #14
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azredhawk - that's the first picture of a broken press I've seen. I think if I busted one particular manufacturer's press I wouldn't have purchased a second. I hope you don't experience the same problem again.
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Old December 8, 2009, 11:42 PM   #15
Bill Daniel
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Press longevity

Many thanks for the input! I will follow the instructions, keep it lubed and avoid the "if it won't work use a bigger hammer" syndrome.
Bill Daniel
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Old December 9, 2009, 12:26 AM   #16
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My old Lyman I bought over 25 years ago still going could use a paint job. Love to know how many times I have pulled that handle.

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Old December 9, 2009, 12:51 AM   #17
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Love to know how many times I have pulled that handle.
That would be cool. I bet it has to be at least a million. Just goes to show how durable these things really are.
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