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Old October 15, 2017, 11:20 PM   #1
jwise
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S&W M27 is going back to the factory.

I just recently acquired a brand new S&W M27. I shot it once, and have been trying to break the trigger in by dry-firing with snap caps.

The double action trigger seized up fast and wouldn't budge.

It's on it's way back to the factory.

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Old October 16, 2017, 12:14 AM   #2
Model12Win
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Hmm, never have had a problem with my old pre-lock Smiths.

The new "classic" line is classic in name only.
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Old October 16, 2017, 05:51 AM   #3
smee78
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Can you still open the action? Could the ejector rod have come unscrewed locking up the gun?
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Old October 16, 2017, 07:09 AM   #4
Carmady
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Kind of a longshot, but maybe one of the snap caps is jammed/wedged in the scalloped part of the recoil shield (where the ejector rod enters while closing an open cylinder).

That's more likely to happen if the gun is pointed upwards while dry firing, gravity pulls the the snap caps back from the cylinder and they get jammed up in the recessed part of the recoil shield.
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Old October 16, 2017, 08:12 AM   #5
arquebus357
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Not for anything, but what will S&W do to unlock the gun ? I can't help thinking that they will just depress the the cylinder lock and whack the cylinder with a mallet or something. What else could they do ? If that's the case why not just do it yourself ?
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Old October 16, 2017, 12:28 PM   #6
357 Python
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You said the double action trigger seized up, can it function in single action mode? Has it been given a good cleaning? Sometimes when they get that way there is a piece of metal shavings in the mechanism that gets caught in the works. you may need to do little more than take the side plate off and spray the insides with a good gun lube. Do not use WD40, after a while that will gum up and cause other problems.
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Old October 16, 2017, 12:33 PM   #7
Driftwood Johnson
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Quote:
Not for anything, but what will S&W do to unlock the gun ? I can't help thinking that they will just depress the the cylinder lock and whack the cylinder with a mallet or something. What else could they do ? If that's the case why not just do it yourself ?
Smith and Wesson will remove the side plate. Then they can disassemble the action parts enabling the cylinder to be freed and removed.

No mallets or whacking necessary.

Regarding the ejector rod coming unscrewed, S&W changed the thread on that to a reverse thread a long time ago, specifically to address that problem. No idea if the current models still have the reverse thread.

No comment regarding the quality of present S&W products vs the old days, but everybody probably knows where I stand on that.
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Old October 16, 2017, 01:52 PM   #8
UncleEd
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JWise,

You say the trigger "seized up."

While dry firing a possibility is a short stroke, trying to pull the trigger
again before it fully returns to "reset" or firing position. Even with
strong factory springs it can be done.

When aftermarket springs are used (I know you didn't)
to achieve a much lighter DA pull, the possibility of a
short stroke increases.

Best to let the trigger finger go forward
or ease up substantially ahead of the trigger
so it can fly forward all by its lonesome.

But whatever, it sounds like an easy fix by S&W.
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Old October 16, 2017, 08:15 PM   #9
jwise
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Yes it can still work in single action, kind of. It's rough and you can tell it's not right.

I took it back to my smith (where I bought it), and he's either going to take a look at fixing it or just send it back. I don't care which he does.
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Old October 20, 2017, 09:28 AM   #10
joed
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That's a gorgeous revolver, shame you have a problem. I have a lot of the older revolvers but have owned some of the newer ones too. Never a problem with the newer versions. In fact I've had more problems with the older guns.

I do have a 29 MG that shoots better then most of my older models, so I can't say anything bad about the newer versions.

Hopefully we'll hear how it shoots when you get it back.
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Old Today, 08:10 AM   #11
Webleymkv
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Quote:
Originally posted by jwise
Yes it can still work in single action, kind of. It's rough and you can tell it's not right.
Sounds to me like the trigger stud probably broke (had the same happen to me on my well-used M28). It's not a particularly common occurrence but it's not unheard of (usually on revolvers which have had the action repeatedly cycled with the sideplate off though I suppose a defective part breaking on its own is possible). I'm guessing that the sideplate is holding the stud firmly enough in place to allow the action to cycle SA, but the added pressure of DA causes it to bind.

While it is possible that your local gunsmith might be able to fix it himself, it's more likely that he'll send it back to S&W. Fixing a broken stud requires drilling out the old one, pressing a new one in, grinding and polishing it down to match the rest of the frame, and then refinishing the gun. Many gunsmiths won't have all the equipment needed to do it properly and even if yours did, I doubt he'd want to take on such an involved and time-consuming job for free when S&W will do it under warranty.
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