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Old December 26, 2007, 07:06 PM   #1
Kaveman
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Join Date: December 15, 2007
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Help with Winchester 100

I am looking to find a smith to perform the firing pin recall on this rifle as well as help with diagnosis and corrective action as to why it will not shoot less than 3" 5 shot groups at 100 yds. It is a family hierloom that I would like to take my son hunting with. Caliber is 308 win.
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Old December 27, 2007, 11:33 AM   #2
johnbt
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Nu-Line was one of the original centers for the firing pin replacement.

www.nulineguns.com/gunsmithing.php

"Nu Line Guns Inc bought all of the parts from Winchester for the Model 100."

www.nulineguns.com/category_part_64_2_21_64.php
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Old December 27, 2007, 12:15 PM   #3
kirbythegunsmith
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Any competent gunsmith is able to get the recall replacement parts from Olin, and I am just on the other side of town from them.
Your main concern, aside from the safety issue, is to see about the accuracy situation.
The options that present themselves for that are numerous, from a bad scope or base system (loose or defective internal adjustment parts, some bases can be improperly assembled and cause problems with lack of solid mounting as well as screws loosening), crown wear uneven, bore condition with dirt or scars/throat erosion, bedding problems that cause twist or bowing, and more.
These type of guns are most likely being cleaned from the muzzle, so avoiding side contact or use of a pull-through is a plus.

If you contact anyone to have the recall fix done, make sure that they will perform just that, if you want, and not give you any song-n-dance about having to fix "safety-related but different issues" before doing the recall fix or with the recall fix. If there are any issues with other problems, you should have the option of having another shop to do the necessary fixes, and not be blackmailed into an "all or nothing" decision. If they provide a free estimate listing all of the problems, then OK. You can go somewhere else, if you want, without paying for anything more than the shipping both ways to the recall shop.
The Olin people provide money for a gunsmith to do the fix, and nobody should attempt to charge for anything else unless agreed upon in advance.
I might suggest a thorough disassembly and cleaning, along with the firing pin fix, but won't force the issue for these guns. I may refuse to work on any other gun that has an obvious safety issue if the safety-related work wasn't agreed as being necessary. Recall fixes can have a release signed by the customer stating that they realize the unsafe nature of the gun being accepted.

If anyone took their car into the dealer for a recall issue, you wouldn't want to be harassed into getting an exhaust system if they spotted a tiny leak. You also have the option of using a chain muffler store for that, not just the dealer.
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Old December 27, 2007, 05:47 PM   #4
Kaveman
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Kirby, can you perform the recall? Would you also be interested in checking my rifle out? Send me a p-m if interested.
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Old January 9, 2008, 03:03 PM   #5
kirbythegunsmith
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I have the most current information from Olin about the recall and there is only one listing for a shop each for Canada and the USA, WR Long in Ontario and Bolsa in CA.

A properly trained gunsmith can also get the recall replacement parts to install in any rifles or carbines that have missed the safety conversion to the updated firing pin system.

That service should not cost anything, with any extra work being agreed to in advance about any extra expenditure.

Some guns that have not been maintained may have parts frozen or difficult to disassemble, and the service person will be able to notice that before much time is expended, and consequently able to notify the shooter before much has happened that is out of the ordinary.

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Old January 24, 2008, 12:50 PM   #6
wachtelhund1
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Kaveman,
One solution to your accuracy problem is to glass bed the action. I just did my model 100 carbine .308 last month after the deer season. It easily reduced my group size in half or more. Prior to glass bedding mine also shot about a 4" group, high, low, left and right; not great but good enough for deer hunting in Northern WI. I have taken the carbine to the range once since glass bedding the action to re-zero the scope. I was sighting in several rifles. The 100 carbine was the last to be zeroed. It shot a fairly rapid, 10 round group 1 1/2" x 4 1/2" wide. The lateral shot placement was caused by my old tired eyes, but a definite improvement. Now I need to work up some speciifc loads for this carbine.
The bedding procedure takes time and is done in a four step proccess. I found the prucedures on the web years ago and copied them to my computer I'll paste them here.

Dave
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tbailey,
Bedding the Winchester Model 100 is a real project because of its unusual action. If you need to identify the "exact" parts I'm referring to, you can look them up on a drawing at this link.
Exploded Drawing - Win model 100

1.) The first step is to bed the recoil block in place - in a separate operation. This is done with the recoil block screw VERY loose. This screw just has to be there to locate its permanent location in a way that won't allow the recoil block to flex the action when your finished.

2.) Bed the front tip of the stock (for about 1"). This will locate the front of the barrel, so that you'll know exactly where it will end up when you're finished. This step just provides a temporary saddle that will be ground away later.

3.) Bed the trigger guard in place (only necessary on the ends) around the screws.

4.) Cut away about 1/8" of wood from the stock under the barrel (just in front of the gas tube) and bed the barrel to the stock for the next 4". After it cures, separate the barrel from the stock, and grind away the temporary saddle made in step #2.

5.) The receiver needs to be bedded on both sides, along the bottom rear 2.5" along its lower edge, and about 3/8" up each side. Also, skin bed the small contact surface of the barreled action (only around the take down screw).

6.) Be sure that the operating rod guide assembly is absolutely free from any binds, or you will wind up creating a real jammer that will drive you crazy. The operating rod guide assembly should also be deburred along the outer surfaces and lightly oiled.

7.) You can then experiment with "tension bedding" by a adding paper shim to the metal-to-metal contact surface of the recoil block. This "flashback" will get you into shooting the best groups that you've ever seen from any Winchester Model 100. Good luck ....

Well, that's it. If you're looking for your groups to tighten up with the Winchester Model 100, that's how it's done. If you'd like to see more tech tips check out our website at WWW.LARRYWILLIS.COM

- Innovative
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Old February 2, 2008, 12:06 AM   #7
thebaldguy
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My uncle has a Model 100; it was taken to a smith years ago for the pin replacement and has functioned perfectly.

It is not the most accurate rifle in the world; even on the best days we were lucky to get 4-5 inch groups at 100 yards. We even tried different scopes to see if accuracy would change; it didn't. Considering most deer in Minnesota are taken at less than 50 yards, the rifle works ok.
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Old February 24, 2008, 11:08 AM   #8
Colokeb
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are you benched?

I have a 100 which shoots 1 1/2 groups, but nicely benched and sandbagged.

Are you benching it? Has anybody else tried it?
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