The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: General Handgun Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 10, 2019, 03:38 PM   #26
SIGSHR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 13, 2005
Posts: 4,205
Some pistols-the Browning designs, the M1911, the High Power were designed to be easily disassembled for maintenance and cleaning, some, like the Ruger 22s-aren't. Revolvers are rather tricky, require at minimum a very good set of screwdrivers and several good manuals. Fortunately there are many good easily accessible videos these days.
An argument for revolvers for novices is that they are somewhat easier to handle and make safe, and a good instructor can deal with flinching by loading alternate chambers with fired cases then handing it to the student.
An analogy is with the bolt action rifle for a novice-like learning to drive with a stick shift, they have to learn and go through the motions, they can't skip them.
SIGSHR is offline  
Old February 10, 2019, 05:15 PM   #27
Dave T
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 16, 2000
Location: Mesa, Arizona
Posts: 1,320
Quote:
I don't get that a revolver is harder to master than a auto. Unless you are talking auto against DA mode in revolver. I've been shooting revolvers and autos since I was a kid. My
interest was accuracy & hunting. I've never practiced DA and never was into rapid fire with
autos. I've got quite a few handguns and only 5 are not target grade handguns. Just for the
purpose of accurate shooting one is no better than the other. Many 1st timers do well with
a k22 or K38 over a target auto RF or CF. For people not focused enough to handle an auto
a revolver is best. For those who want to put forth some effort an auto may be best.
Interesting. My last 6 years in law enforcement I was the chief firearms instructor for my department, responsible for training and qualifying a little over 400 armed personal. Everyone from reserved deputies and the Sheriff's Posse to the SWAT team. I can guarantee you it is easier to train someone with a semi auto than a DA revolver. Or stated another way, with the same training time and rounds fired someone shooting a semi auto will be a better defensive shooter than his/her classmate shooting a revolver. There are individual exceptions but this applies as a general rule.

I started my LEO career with a revolver, competed in PPC competition for two years with a revolver, competed in IDPA with a revolver, collected N-frame Smith & Wessons for a number of years and am currently carrying a S&W 386 Night Guard. In all that time I hardly ever shot DA revolvers anyway but double action. I've never even cocked the hammer on the 386 NG with my thumb, only by DA trigger pull.

YMMV,
Dave
__________________
RSVN '69-'71
PCSD Ret
Dave T is online now  
Old February 10, 2019, 06:13 PM   #28
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 19,236
Quote:
Or stated another way, with the same training time and rounds fired someone shooting a semi auto will be a better defensive shooter than his/her classmate shooting a revolver.
I won't argue with this, as I've never trained anyone to shoot defensively. I have introduced and "trained" a number of people to shoot recreationally, and I hold that, absent a dire need (imminent threat, becoming a police officer, etc.) that one should start recreationally, learning shooting, handling, and safety there, THEN moving on to more specific defensive training, WHEN they are ready, if they choose to do so.

Revolvers, and shooting single action have advantages in this, semi autos strengths become more important later, I feel.

One can train complete beginners to be combat shooters, many do it that way. But if there isn't an immediate need, why not teach them just to shoot for enjoyment first? There is more to handgunning than just combat/defensive shooting, why not expose them to that, as well as what to do in gravest extreme?
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is offline  
Old February 12, 2019, 11:05 AM   #29
SmellyShooter
Member
 
Join Date: February 6, 2019
Location: DFW, Texas
Posts: 36
I can attest to the difficulty of dealing with a revolver malfunctioning. I have a little DAO snubbie in .357 that I was shooting .38 spcls through it and the cylinder didn't cycle completely and a little bit of the copper jacket from the bullet sheered off and completely locked the gun up. If I had been in trouble I would basically just have had a rock to throw at the bad guy. I would not consider myself to be physically weak and I couldn't force it open with my hands. I ended up having to tap it open with a rubber mallet. It has worked fine since then but it certainly freaked me out since I had been carrying it off and on for a couple years. So if a revolver malfunctions, you better hope for God to come down and smite the bad guy, because you won't be saving yourself. Better to have 30 minutes of instruction with a semi auto in my book. And I like revolvers far more than semi-auto so I wouldn't consider myself biased in favor of semi auto handguns.
__________________
"If you can make yourself laugh, you'll never be lonely"

-me
SmellyShooter is offline  
Old February 12, 2019, 07:31 PM   #30
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 19,236
Generally semi autos have more minor malfunctions than revolvers (they have much more to do). Generally minor malfunctions in a semi are relatively easy to clear.

Revolvers don't suffer the kind of minor malfunctions semis do, and when a major one happens, it usually ties up the gun beyond a simple "clearance drill" level fix.

And a major malfunction will tie up a semi auto as well.

Over all, I don't think one outweighs the other. But, that's just me...
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is offline  
Old February 13, 2019, 07:40 PM   #31
Leaf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 11, 2018
Posts: 131
Yeah, for whatever it is worth from an old timer and a fan of both, if the weapon is for basic self-defense and the recipient isn't going to be attentive to cleaning and learning how to clear a malfunction I'd suggest a double action revolver with a couple of speed loaders.
Leaf is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.04833 seconds with 8 queries