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Old July 16, 2011, 03:35 PM   #1
bprevolver
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Schneider & Glassick Replica

I have posted an article about the Schneider & Glassick "Accidental" Replica. Since there has been some discussion about these revolvers I had to add my two cents worth. Again, I preface all my opinions on what I have uncovered at this point and restate that, "The more I learn the less I seem to know".

The following link will take you to the article on the RPRCA web site. It does not yet appear in the directory of the web site.

http://rprca.tripod.com/Article%20Sc.../schneider.htm
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Old July 16, 2011, 03:57 PM   #2
OutlawJoseyWales
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Thank you for posting this.
Enjoyed the read. Do you have anymore links such as this?
OJW
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Old July 16, 2011, 04:10 PM   #3
Hawg
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Very good read indeed. Thanks for posting it.
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Old July 16, 2011, 04:29 PM   #4
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Yes,

Good read, Dr. D.

Tnx,
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Old July 16, 2011, 05:41 PM   #5
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bp, I enjoyed reading your interesting article. I realize you are mainly interested in the replicas of the Schneider & Glassick revolver, but I want to run something by you. If you think has merit I hope you will comment on it, or if you don't want to comment on it yourself, I hope you will at least forward it on to the people you know who would know something about the originals.

Schneider & Glassick (of Memphis, Tn.) and Griswold & Gunnison (of Georgia) both produced brass-framed revolvers manufactured on the Colt 1851 Navy pattern.; in fact, except for the different names and different shaped barrels they look remarkably alike to me in the pictures I've seen.

No one knows exactly when Schneider and Glassick began or ended production of it's Colt type revolvers, except that ithey had commenced production no later than Dec. 8, 1862 when an article praising their product appeared in a Memphis newspaper.

Memphis fell to Union forces on June 6, 1862 and no S&G's are known to have been produced after that date.

New Orleans fell to the Union a little earlier than Memphis, surrendering on April 28, 1862.

One of the principals of what later became Griswold & Gunnison was from New Orleans, and supposedly went to Georgia when that city fell, and started manufacturing G&G revolvers for the Confederacy, beginning in July of 1862.

I wonder if anybody has ever checked the Schneider & Glassick brass frames to see if they could determine whether or not Schneider & Glassick revolvers were made on the same equipment that produced frames for the later Griswold & Gunnison revolvers?

I'm thinking that G&G may have bought the S&G equipment sometime between the date New Orleans fell on April 28, 1862 and the date Memphis fell on June 6, 1862 and moved it to Georgia, and that these two brands of revolvers were essentially the same except for the different barrels.

I've read that 3,600 G&G revolvers were produced from July 1862 to Nov. 27, 1864 and that less than 250 still exist. No one knows how many S&G revolvers were produced but production is believed to have been small, and probably lasted no longer than a few months. Using the same produced to surviving ratio for S&G as for G&G, which is about 14 to 1, there were probably no more than about 42 S&G revolvers produced.

Last edited by DG45; July 16, 2011 at 05:46 PM.
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Old July 16, 2011, 06:13 PM   #6
Hawg
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Interesting theory but Gunnison was already making guns in NOLA. Why not just move the equipment he already had instead of buying S&G equipment and moving it from memphis?
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Old July 16, 2011, 07:00 PM   #7
Doc Hoy
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I am no historian....Just a crackpot..but

Some vessels were scuttled when NOLA fell because there was no time to get them underway.

There may have been no time to move machine tools or there may have been no conveyance available to move them.

Just speculation.

Tnx,
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Old July 16, 2011, 07:22 PM   #8
Hawg
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I'm thinking any gun making equipment in Memphis would have been destroyed also. Not to mention the fact that rail service was undependable and enemy troops on the move. Moving shop equipment would have been close to impossible if not impossible.
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Old July 16, 2011, 08:41 PM   #9
DG45
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I'd think that the New Orleans gun-making equipment would have never gotten out of that city unless it was moved out before April 28, 1862 because the Federals would have never allowed it to leave after April 28.

I doubt if the equipment was moved because I don't think anyone expected their city to fall. After all, Andrew jackson had defeated the mighty British there in the War of 1812.

If Schneider and Glassick was actually manufacturing their revolvers, not importanting them as has been suggested, they'd have lost their equipment too when Mempis fell on June 6, if (a) they ever actually had gun making equipment in Memphis, and (b) if they did, if their gun making equipment was still there when the city fell.

But just looking at the replica Schneider & Glassic I have and pictures of a Griswold & Gunnison revolver, everything looks the same except the barrels. I was just wondering if the frames were manufactured by the same equipment, and if that could be proved by the dimensions of the frame or something like that.

Anyhow, somehow, someway, from somewhere, gunmaking equipment had arrived in a small town in Georgia in time for Griswold & Gunnison to begin manufacture of their line of revolvers beginning in July, 1862, and that line of revolvers looked almost identical in appearance to the Schneider and Glassic revolver that apparently stopped being produced sometime within a few months of the time that Griswold & Gunnison began their production run in July 1862.

Last edited by DG45; July 16, 2011 at 11:45 PM.
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Old July 16, 2011, 10:34 PM   #10
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Great read Jim. Thanks for posting it. I've printed a copy to add to my reference library
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Old July 17, 2011, 02:53 PM   #11
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Well done, bp! I really enjoyed reading that - added another wrinkle to the old bean.
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Old July 17, 2011, 03:40 PM   #12
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Excellent paper. Thank you.
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Old July 18, 2011, 06:24 PM   #13
Hardy
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I had a brass 36/c gun w/Gunnison stamped on it in 1974. I sold it for $100.00 C.S.A. was stamped on top of the barrel just above the cone. It still fired too! Wish I strill had it
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Old July 19, 2011, 03:19 AM   #14
Bootsie
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I hope we are in agreement to properly call the Colt Navy 1851 pattern, .36 cal. octagon barrel, plain cylinder brasser replicas SCHNEIDER & GLASSICK now?!
Thanks Jim, that you ended this Babylonian confusion!
Bootsie aka Long Johns Wolf

Last edited by Bootsie; July 20, 2011 at 08:33 AM.
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Old July 22, 2011, 08:38 PM   #15
Hardy
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BP---thanks for that article because now I believe that gunnison I had was probably a fake. For one reason--why would they have stamped C.S.A on the barrel. Now I can rest easy knowing I didn't(probably) give away a treasure

WBH
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