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Old January 10, 2019, 09:26 AM   #1
FoghornLeghorn
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Loctite for scope base?

Is blue loctite too much?

It's a 30-06 bolt with Warne mounts and rings.
Picatinny two piece mount and vertical rings.




Going on a Remington 700 mountain rifle.

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Old January 10, 2019, 09:39 AM   #2
NoSecondBest
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Blue Loc-Tite is the least "robust" thread locker you can use. It's formulated to keep the two parts from coming apart due to vibration. It never really hardens and is always easily removed. Way too many "gunsmiths" don't understand how a thread locker works. They seem to think that more torque is better, and use a thread sealer than really hardens up. Not the way to do it. Torque to correct specs (if you don't know when too much is too much) and use Blue for scope bases and rings. You don't even need heat to get Blue loose again. If you use Red, you're going to have some problems if you don't use heat....it might not come loose again. Then, there's Purple. It's a lot like Blue but really isn't any better for common sized screws in scope mounting applications. Answer to your question: No, Blue certainly isn't "too much".
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Old January 10, 2019, 10:11 AM   #3
AmmunitionDepot
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Well said NoSecondBest, and I agree blue isn't too much.
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Old January 10, 2019, 10:37 AM   #4
FoghornLeghorn
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Thanks for the above. My digital torque wrench is a half inch drive and probably impractical for driving a #8 machine screw.

I've always used the typical allen wrench to mount scopes. I tighten them to hand tightness to where the 'L' shaped "wrench" flexes a little bit. Tight enough to where it's uncomfortable to go beyond that point.

I've not had any problems, and I never used a thread locker. Back in the day, I've used fingernail polish, but I don't remember how that turned out.

So, I'll use the blue. I know I don't want to use red as I might swap out the system at some point.

thanks again
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Old January 10, 2019, 03:46 PM   #5
Eazyeach
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Nice rifle btw
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Old January 21, 2019, 03:06 PM   #6
SGW Gunsmith
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FoghornLeghorn View Post
Is blue loctite too much?

It's a 30-06 bolt with Warne mounts and rings.
Picatinny two piece mount and vertical rings.




Going on a Remington 700 mountain rifle.

It all depends on which 'blue' Loctite you choose. I recommend and use #242 for optics base holes, but only after completely cleaning and degreasing the threads, both internal and external. Many of the neophytes ignore that important step.
Several of the better base makers do actually provide a small tube of #242 blue, which is a serviceable thread-locker, meaning, standard hand tools are all that's needed. the thread-locker is suppose to coagulate. It's purpose is to fill any gaps or mismatch of the threads.
Number 6 and 8 threads are not recommended to be torqued, as the heads will easily get stripped. Interesting that nobody above provided an inch-ounce torque number? Finger tight, on cleaned threads, using #242 Loctite for base screws. Clean threads, with finger tight screws on scope ring threads. You will never go wrong.
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Old January 21, 2019, 04:53 PM   #7
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Holy tall a$$ rings!!

Contrary to popular belief, blue Loctite(242) is actually not the recommended Loctite for gun work. Aka rings/bases.
The purple Loctite (222) is actually what is recommended.
I got mine from Fastenal.
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Old January 21, 2019, 05:19 PM   #8
NoSecondBest
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Quote:
Contrary to popular belief, blue Loctite(242) is actually not the recommended Loctite for gun work.
I think most are aware of Blue and Purple. My question is who doesn't recommend using Blue? Most gunsmiths use Blue and have no problems with it. The description on the label doesn't say to not use Blue, it simply says on the Purple it's for small screw, etc. That does not exclude Blue fo scope bases and screws. Either will work for scope and base mounting. Purple hasn't been around as long as Blue and most people still use the Blue. FWIW, Leupold has a couple of videos out on scope mounting and don't recommend using any LocTite. I suspect LocTite will someday have the entire rainbow covered.....it sells more products. Avoid Red, it takes around 500 degrees to get it to turn soft enough to let go. Blue and Purple stay pliable enough to get back off with the tools they were put on with.

Last edited by NoSecondBest; January 21, 2019 at 05:33 PM.
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Old January 21, 2019, 07:37 PM   #9
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Lots O Loctite

I've been a manufacturer's rep for a good many years now. We use a lot of loctite in manufacturing the Eq. I sell.

Purple would be the "perfect" loctite. Blue works great for 6, 8 or # 10 machine thread screws.

Thread engagement is typically specified at 75% for standard machine screws. Loctite fills in that last 25% and strengthens the assembly. Of course it's primary purpose is to prevent loosening from vibration.

Loctite does not "work" in the presence of oil or grease. In fact the primer sold for loctite is primarily a cleaning solvent to get rid of oil.

Never use Red on small fasteners.
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Old January 21, 2019, 08:07 PM   #10
pete2
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Locktite the base screws, don't use too much. I have seen the bolt locktited, one of the front holes on some guns is a thru hole.
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Old January 21, 2019, 08:47 PM   #11
gw44
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I think it is a must, I had a base come loose, did not know it until I test fired it at camp, after that I lock them down !!!!
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Old January 21, 2019, 08:53 PM   #12
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"Holy tall a$$ rings!! "

Yeah, what an abomination to use such stuff on a nice looking rifle like that.
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Old January 21, 2019, 10:09 PM   #13
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So..... am I the only one that learned the hard way that picatinny and weaver are not interchangeable?
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Old January 21, 2019, 10:16 PM   #14
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I use blue locktite on all my scope mounts. I've taken a lot of scope off and on moving them around and never had an issue. Screw are easily removed. Clean the screws and hole thouroghly. I don't apply the locktite directly, seem like I always get a blob when I do that. Instead I put a drop on a small piece of scrap and dip the end thread into the drop just slightly only leaving a small amount on the screw.

I use locktite 243 medium strength. Why you ask? Because that was what I had on my workbench. According to locktite website, purple would be the correct product.

Last edited by Troy800; January 21, 2019 at 10:36 PM.
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Old January 22, 2019, 09:56 AM   #15
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Be careful if you share

Loctite and it's many "clones" are all anerobic sealants.

If you have a large container of Loctite and wish to share it and place it in another container airspace is very important.

A bottle of Loctite is never full when it comes from the manufacturer. There is always a healthy amount of airspace in the bottle.

If you fill a container full of Locktite and cap it up tight it will set in the bottle.

Air keeps Loctite liquid. Always leave a healthy amount of airspace in the bottle.
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Old January 22, 2019, 10:20 AM   #16
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I mount a lot of scopes. I do a professional job and I'm not a big box guy that slaps a scope on and sends the customer out the door.

If you are mounting your scope to a rail then you can use a small amount of Blue or Purple Loctite on the base screws. You can also use the Red Loctite but you have to remember that you'll need to heat the screws to around 200 degrees if you ever want to remove them.

However, if you torque your screws evenly, the odds of them coming loose without using Loctite are dramatically reduced. 17 inch lbs for #6 and 25 inch lbs for #8.

If you are putting a spot of Loctite on the rings themselves, as I've heard some manufacturers recommend, bear in mind that this is for folks that do not have the proper ring lapping tools and don't want to invest in them for one scope. The preferred method is to lap the rings properly so that they grip the scope all the way around and not just a few pinch points.
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Old January 22, 2019, 03:10 PM   #17
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We often see plumbers that use sealant on a union joint or other joints (flare etc) like JIC fittings.

Fortunately the hydraulic pressure usually drives it out to where it does the right metal to metal fit.

The plumber then says, I use X sealant and I never get a leak. Right Mel.

If Locktiete is needed, then its one of two issues.

Toque is too low and you glued it in.

Toque was too high and you put the fastener (screw) into the plastic range and it will never hold right (glue it in)

As noted, the red really glues it in, but then getting it undone is a fight.
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Old January 23, 2019, 09:57 AM   #18
Ricklin
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Tapered

With regard to plumbers and pipe threads.

Pipe threads are tapered, machine thread screws are not. Sealant is a must for tapered pipe thread.
Loctite is quite effective as a pipe thread sealant. Tapered pipe threads will leak every time W/O sealant.
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Old January 25, 2019, 02:30 PM   #19
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Quote:
Nice rifle btw
Thanks eazy. That's an identical pic to mine except mine is a southpaw. Equally mint. Mine is a Remington 700KS Mountain Rifle manufactured in 2002 according to Remington customer service. The only bad thing about it was the 'J' lock on the bolt shroud and, being as how it was on the left side, as is the safety, would snag my thumb.

So I put a Daniel Holland stainless firing pin assembly on it. Sans 'J' lock, of course.

The rings I pictured above were too tall so I went with these.

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