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Old November 1, 2005, 12:18 AM   #26
Dragun
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good on ya, Grav. gerber is a good working knife. i have been using knives on a daily basis for around 40 years. i beat the crap out of em every day. we're not talking uber tactical here. most tactical (super expensive) knives say do not pry, use as a screwdriver, etc. etc... why? they don't want you to break them. i use mine to pry, turn screws, etc. etc. everyday. a man without a pocketknife is like... well, you get my drift. i'm not payin' hundreds of dollars just so i can look at it. incidently, i do like benchmade for tactical. my buddy is a dealer, so i get good deals on them. if there is a chance it could get wasted or lost (in the deep blue), why pay big bucks.

what makes one knife 5 times more expensive than another. stainless is stainless. sure there is 360 stainless, 410 stainless, 440 stainless, bla bla bla. i beleive the 300 series is non magnetic, whatever. they can only get so hard. 62 or 63 hardness on the rockwell C scale. any harder and they will crack if they are not drawn down in a draw funace. i used to heat treat steel for a living many years ago. filet knives are usually 45 to 50 hardness (spring steel). too hard and they will be brittle and snap with much flex.

of course, i wear a timex, and that is another debate. i have money but i'm not going to throw it away for bragging rights on a name. i use what works from experience.
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Old November 1, 2005, 01:46 AM   #27
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There is, as I understand it, more to steel than hardness. There is toughness, too. I guess that edge-holding ability is related mostly to hardness. But there are also handle materials to think about; construction; fit and finish; design and utility; construction strength...

I'm not saying that your knife must cost $350 like a Chris Reeve Sebenza (though people who own them rave about them)... and I admit that some $25 knives do great, but if you bump up to spending maybe $60-80 on a Benchmade, you'll not only have a great user knife, you can also stare at it and handle it and enjoy how very cool it also is...

Oh, and same with Spyderco.


If you need a good knife for a boat, one that will resist rusting, get a Benchmade 100SH2O. It's a combo edge, yeah, but really sharp, good in the hand, can be mounted on a PFD, has the option for a high-vis yellow grip, and is made of H1 steel, which is very rust-resistant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dragun
of course, i wear a timex, and that is another debate. i have money but i'm not going to throw it away for bragging rights on a name. i use what works from experience.
+1 I'm a Casio man, myself, but I'm with you on this philosophy.
I'm not into it for the name brands; it's just that many times, the name brands are well known because they are superior products.


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Old November 1, 2005, 02:22 AM   #28
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FYI hardness is just a measure of a material's resistance to scratching, IE glass is pretty hard, I would not really want a knife made out of it though. Also, when I say I wore out my kershaw, I meant it fell apart. I probably could replace the screws and whatnot and it would be fine, but it had seen a lot of abuse I really fell in love with the CRKT. The main thing I look for in a folding knife now, aside from basic quality and the ability to retain a locked position even if struck with a hard/heavy object on the back of the blade(very important), is index finger opening stud of some kind. I have found this makes a knife much faster and easier to open and draw.
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Old November 1, 2005, 02:26 AM   #29
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Benchmade 100SH2O, very nice knife, made for being around water if i remember right. thinking they're around $80-$100 bucks?

as far as being really sharp, most knives are nowdays. i remember buying my first knife that had a real edge. a Case knife that was so razor sharp i couldn't believe it. one of my friends (not the brightest bulb) sliced his thumb to the bone just checking it out, and threw it across a parking lot. although, when i was young, all knives were almost dull out of the box and we sharpened em ourselves. if you use it at all, even cardboard will dull em in one day. if you use it daily, i would suggest being able to sharpen it as well.
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Old November 1, 2005, 02:32 AM   #30
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blackwater, the rockwell hardness test is done with a press type of device that puts weight on a pointed tip and makes it sink into the metal being tested. how far in it goes is measured to get results as to how hard the metal is. glass or other non metalic materials will not get too far.
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Old November 1, 2005, 02:44 AM   #31
Blackwater OPS
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I stand corrected, I was thinking of mineral hardness which is was the limit of my education on hardness. It seems hardness in reference to metals has an entirely different definition.

Tests to find strength of metal-http://www.standardservice.ro/index_files/Glosar.htm Whew, maybe the 2x4 test is not such a bad idea after all, at least its quick!
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Old November 1, 2005, 03:13 AM   #32
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"other non metalic materials will not get too far."

doh! now i stand corrected. i had no idea plastic and rubber were tested with a rockwell tester. only have experience with metals. nice link BW OPS.
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Old November 1, 2005, 07:47 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragun
Benchmade 100SH2O, very nice knife, made for being around water if i remember right. thinking they're around $80-$100 bucks?

I don't remember what I spent on it. It was probably around $80, I think. Not sure now.


Quote:
although, when i was young, all knives were almost dull out of the box and we sharpened em ourselves. if you use it at all, even cardboard will dull em in one day. if you use it daily, i would suggest being able to sharpen it as well.
Absolutely! Being able to sharpen is worth very much!

I have noticed that in the last three or so years, knives I get are sharper when new than they were before that. I used to buy Spydercos that needed work before they were users. Now they do a great job of making them sharp right off.

I have a Spyderco Bill Moran Featherweight that is really pretty amazingly sharp -- I'm afraid to try to sharpen it. It will be a stretch to put an edge back on it that's as good as the factory edge it had. (That's why I haven't really even used the knife yet! Don't wanna necessitate sharpening it!)

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Old November 1, 2005, 08:55 PM   #34
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I have at least 10 different folders (I'm addicted). 6 of those are Benchmades although some of those are more for collection than use. I have to agree with Pilot on the 710 McHenry Williams. I have gotten a few other knives afterwards but that 710 never seems to give up its place on my waistband. The ergonomics are absolutely fantastic! The Axis lock is awesome (super smooth and easy to open AND close with one hand). I love the combo edge as I get the best of both worlds. Benchmade has their Lifesharp guarantee where they will sharpen your knife for around $5 for the S&H.

The Axis lock keeps the blade close under tension but it opens up easily.

Uh oh... I shouldn't have gone on the Benchmade site... Now I think I have found my next knife. It is the 10200 Ambush The handle is made of aluminum and the Blade is AUS 8. The SB model is black coated to prevent corrosion. This knife only costs less than $100!

One other thing I wanted to share was one of the best damn knife dealers I have dealt with. I have bought quite a few things from Bayou Lafouche Knifeworks and have always been very happy with the service and my purchase. They have great pricing and I don't have to worry about whether the guy on Ebay is legit or not!
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Old November 1, 2005, 09:10 PM   #35
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I too keep a Gerber at the ready. The model I am carrying now is the Hersey Air Ranger. Nice everyday all around blade. The blade is like 3-1/8", Textured aluminum handle and is ambidextrious as you can open it easily with the left or right hand thumb. Its a drop point blade with knife edge the first 1/2 to 3/4 of the blade and serated at the portion to the rear of the blade. All in all very handy, lighting fast to access and they do take a beating. I use a sparing drop of gun oil once every 3-6 months to keep the action smooth. You got a lot of choices to sift through, good luck.
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Old November 1, 2005, 09:14 PM   #36
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If you live in a state that allows auto-knives, and they have a factory in that state (can't cross state lines, federal law) then I would suggest an auto.

I have and carry the Mini-Reflex by Benchmade. I am currently trying to buy another (thank goodness my gunshop that I go to has a lifetime (if that what it takes) lay-a-way program for regulars) Benchmade that is larger than the mini and also an auto.

If you have to go with a normal folder, again Benchmade but if you wish lower price, the Buck Knives have always been good (and they have a heck of a history behind them).

I don't know if Uncle Henry and Old Timer is still around but I still have my Uncle Henry that I got for my 10th birthday but it isn't easy open and the Old Timer truly is, it belonged to my great grandfather, again not an easy open type. They have held up remarkably well, especially the Uncle Henry (in 27 years, you know what that thing has been used for ).

Wayne
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Old November 1, 2005, 09:39 PM   #37
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I once had a Cold Steel medium Voyager, with a tanto-point, 3", fully serrated blade. It came scary sharp from the factory and cut through anything I wanted it to with ease. Serrations are not just for rope, although I'm sure rope-cutting could come in handy on a boat. This knife ripped through cardboard, plastic packages and plant stems like nobody's business. The stabbing point of the tanto is also useful. With one of the aforementioned hard plastic packages, you can insert the knife wherever you want and just rip it out to the side.

I never considered sharpening it in the three years I had it, because it just looked too difficult. On the other hand, I never needed to sharpen it. It always cut what I needed it to. I consider this a disposable knife, but one that should last for years. And, you could buy three of them and still not exceed $100 if you shop around.

After I lost that knife, I bought a Spyderco Calypso Jr. on closeout. This is a very NICE knife. I wouldn't consider abusing it like I did the Cold Steel, though, because it's more delicate.

I also have a CRKT M-16 with the Carson flipper. The flipper is great, but the blade is not. It doesn't slice nearly as well as the Calypso Jr., and it's nowhere near as rugged as the Cold Steel. It's also the only folder I have that has a rust problem. And the handle gets filled with dirt and lint because it's full of holes.

I think you should find a good $30-35 knife, and then buy three of them.

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Old November 1, 2005, 09:51 PM   #38
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One more thing:

If you're considering a folder that you plan to use near the water (or, heaven forbid, in water), if it's not titanium or H1 steel, make sure you get one that can be user-disassembled/reassembled, so that you can maintain it, clean it, lubricate it...

Many many models can't be taken apart, but many can. Choose carefully.

As I understand it, in 2006, Spyderco will be releasing (FINALLY!) a Delica that is screwed together instead of riveted. I can't wait!


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Old November 1, 2005, 09:51 PM   #39
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I just went to check out the Spyderco Web Site and came across this in the Specials section. This knife looks pretty good for your purposes and is pretty inexpensive. Hell, I might even get one!
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Old November 2, 2005, 01:06 AM   #40
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Another Kershaw Leek fan.
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Old November 2, 2005, 01:39 AM   #41
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The Kershaws often have recurved blades (an S shape), and as such cannot really be sharpened adequately on a flat bench stone (like my ceramic Spyderco stone). I won't buy recurved blades; I simply don't like them, specifically because of the sharpening issue. Also, some Kershaws have these weird serrations that are IMPOSSIBLE to sharpen. They look like rounded teeth, and have a very fine angle between each of them. No stone I know of can get in there. I have no idea why they designed the serrations that way. "Disposable knife"? Once it's dull, you throw it away and get a new one? Same thing with the really tiny serrations on some Cold Steel knives. Forget about it.


Spyderco's serrations CAN be sharpened, but it's a bitch.

I am opting more and more for what is long tried and true: PLAIN blades.
The newfangled [color=#FF0000]█[/color][color=#FF0000]█[/color][color=#FF0000]█[/color][color=#FF0000]█[/color][color=#FF0000]█[/color][color=#FF0000]█[/color][color=#FF0000]█[/color] is not worth it -- all fluff and no real reason for it except to 'keep it fresh" with new ideas. The best new ideas in the last few decades regarding knives have been the Spyderhole (and other one-hand-opening innovations), neck knives, the liner lock, the frame lock, the Ball-Bearing Lock, the compression lock, and maybe the Spyderedge serrations.

All these fancy Gil-Hibbenesque recurves on blades, I can do without. All they boil down to is needless complication of a very very simple tool. They're nothing but marketing.


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Old November 2, 2005, 02:54 AM   #42
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Agree with previous guy who obviously knows more than me BUT there are simple and modest priced kershaw almost strait plain OR serrated blades. the leek is one. 4"closed with 3" blade. Slender and simple. There are other manufacturers of course.

http://www.knivesplus.com/kershaw-le...ke-1660bb.html
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Old November 2, 2005, 06:59 PM   #43
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Thanks for posting the link to that Kershaw -- it is indeed a good-looking knife. I'd even buy one, seeing it now. (But I'm saving up for the new disassemblable Delica...)

So I agree, not all Kershaws would necessarily fail to fit my tastes.


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Old November 3, 2005, 12:22 PM   #44
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Quote:
Agree with previous guy who obviously knows more than me BUT there are simple and modest priced kershaw almost strait plain OR serrated blades. the leek is one. 4"closed with 3" blade. Slender and simple. There are other manufacturers of course.

I first bought a regular Leek. I liked it so much, I bought a designer-looking Rainbow Leek. It's got a nice cool effect. And you can wear it with your business suit as it's less intimidating for sheeple.
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Old November 3, 2005, 12:38 PM   #45
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+1 for CRKT (I'm with Blackwater Ops)

I have ColdSteel, Gerber and CRKT. I've become very fond of my CRKT knives. They are dis-assembl-able (is that a word), very rugged and fit my hand well. Their locking mechanisms are second to none. I also like them because they don't look like a cheap knockoff. Many of their models are made in the USA. I just bought the small 14k model for my son and gave it to him at deer camp. http://www.crkt.com/14ksummt.html

My ColdSteel and Gerber knives get used and are excellent knives. But one of my CRKT's is always with me.

Good Luck,
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Old November 3, 2005, 12:53 PM   #46
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Humm I dont see why some of your dont seem to like Buck knifes, I once bought a 200$ knife at a gunshow because the guy was offering them cheap on special (it was some new model forget the make) he gave it to us for 100$ I saw it a few weeks later at a few stores for up to 250$ so I decided I got a good deal and used it for a while. It broke down faster then my cheap Buck knifes doing pretty much the same stuff. Using it to cut wood, gut salmon, and do anything else you can think of with a knife.

That was 100$ to waste But hey my 40$ Buck knife I bought right after it broke on me has and keeps lasting on me and I have owned it now for 3 years

Best knife I ever got was a East German Bayonet you can find them around the net for lik 20$ US. It has yet to even need a good sharpening and I have had it for about 2 years.

Dimitri
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Old November 3, 2005, 01:07 PM   #47
AJ Peacock
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Buck is a nice cheap knife. I even have a couple. I'd rather have one that:
1) has serrations to keep your hand from sliding up
2) will dis-assemble for cleaning
3) will stay locked, even while being used 'harshly'

My CRKT's have all been less than $50 and they all have the above.

AJ
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Old November 10, 2005, 04:39 PM   #48
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If you have a Big 5 sporting goods in your area, check out their sales.
I picked up a Smith & Wesson folder with a 3.38 blade for $12
a month or so ago and it has held up great for such a cheap knife.
Easy one hand opening, liner lock, titanium coated blade.
Holds a nice edge and I have used it a lot cutting thick cable ties.
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Old December 17, 2005, 06:50 PM   #49
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Like the CRKT

I carry the M16-13Z daily and on duty. Holds an edge well, has the serrations, not too big. Heavy clip that doesn't slip, opens easily with one hand....everything I need!
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Old December 17, 2005, 09:36 PM   #50
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+1 on the columbia river m16-14le thats what I carry. the "carson flipper" is good for a quick open. I don't like switchblade or spring assist because you gotta rely on a spring and may run into probs with the law. You also want to check on the legality of a 4" knife completly concealed in your pocket. I wear mine clipped onto my pocket leaving 1" exposed, but it is navy in color and blends in well with some pants. come to think of it I could m-nu the clip to re blacken the worn parts.....
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