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Old August 15, 2017, 05:19 PM   #51
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The only reason I'm hesitant to buy the stand and the turret press is it'll cost me $200 more than the C press will and it will take up a lot more space, but it is a press I want and will get eventually, so maybe just getting it now and stop pussyfooting isn't a bad idea.
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Old August 15, 2017, 05:46 PM   #52
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If funds are not an issue then I'd say buy what you truly want the 1st time. Don't settle for something less because down the road you will only question yourself as to why you did it.

If it is truly a matter of space then I suggest you visit some of the other forums, most have a thread somewhere on the topic of benches. You truly will be surprised by how little some are getting away with using. Or just do a web search for reloading benches.
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Old August 15, 2017, 10:23 PM   #53
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I had that press for years and did hundreds of loads with it. Worked fine as a single stage press . . . until the day that I literally broke the back off the mounting flange. Still worked fine, but I moved up to a better Lee press and just recently up to a Lee turret press which I am liking very much.

Life is good.
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Old August 16, 2017, 11:40 AM   #54
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It is no secret that Lee is the "low bidder" in the reloading game. For a new press you are unlikely to find a cheaper price than Lee offers. Some of their presses are better than others they offer but they are made of less expensive materials and materials that are not as strong as the more expensive presses offered by others. I prefer to buy one press that lasts a lifetime. I prefer to remember the quality i bought and feeling satisfied with what I paid. I am not a Lee "hater" because their products serve a portion of the market and allow people to start reloading on a budget. They are typically cheap presses that flex and break under what I consider to be "normal" use. My Rock Chucker and Lyman turret presses have lasted for more than 40 years and show no signs of wear. They are made of steel and cast iron and will last several lifetimes. You should always use the best quality that you can afford. If that is a product made by Lee and it does the job you ask of it then that is what you should use.
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Old August 16, 2017, 12:44 PM   #55
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OK, K.I.S.S. Get the "C" press and load with it. If you have any problems (which I never had) you can get an "O" press later. And you are not locked into one press for the rest of your life (I've had mebbe 8 or 10 presses, still have 4, from gigantic cast iron "O" to lightweight aluminum "C" presses. All made good, safe accurate ammo, from start to finish, when I did my part.). Don't overthink this. You can load safely and accurately with the Lee "C" press. I have never experienced press "flexing" and prolly wouldn't recognize it if it did occur.
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Old August 16, 2017, 01:11 PM   #56
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Quote:
TruthTellers wrote:
What's your opinion on this Lee press?
Worth every penny you pay for it.

But then you're not paying a lot for it.

In a C style press, the die is cantilevered over the ram and will move more than it would in a similar press with an O configuration. The fact the press is aluminum and not iron will increase that movement.

I was looking at one to keep at the farm to deprime cases and hold seating dies to allow me to adjust the seating depth of cartridges I had brought with me. If that's the kind of thing you are looking to do, the Lee C style press will work fine.

In my case, I found a used RCBS Reloader Special cast iron O press on E-bay for about the same money, so I bought that instead since I already have one and am familiar with it.
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Old August 16, 2017, 01:19 PM   #57
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Quote:
TruthTellers wrote:
Would this "O" frame press be more robust and hold up better over time with more intense loading operations like full length re-sizing?
It will be more robust than a C style press, but a press can (and in my opinion should) be a once-in-a-lifetime investment and you will be happiest if you spend the few extra dollars now that it will cost to get a press with a cast iron frame.

We could go into all sorts of technical reasons why cast iron might be preferred over aluminum (i.e. lower modulus of elasticity, lower thermal expansion, shock resistance, etc.) but at the end of the day you are more likely to have a better reloading experience with a cast iron press than an aluminum one - particularly if you are going to get into high stress applications like case forming.
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Old August 17, 2017, 07:26 AM   #58
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For me aluminum isn't a deal breaker. I have spent lots of hours flying around, floating in and driving things that have engines, transmissions and structures made from the stuff.

That said I am not against cast iron either, although if it breaks, it's a bit more difficult to repair.
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Old August 17, 2017, 08:13 AM   #59
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Both cast aluminum and cast iron can and do break and both are a pain to repair.

Also just like a forged steel crankshaft it can break and when it does it's because it was stretched beyond it's designed working point. So I too do not follow your correlation.

Or how about the massive B52 Bomber. It's wings would flex 22' from the at rest position to in flight position and these things have been in service for 50+ years. So again I do not follow your line if you want to discuss "High Stress".
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Old August 17, 2017, 08:46 AM   #60
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Truth,

If money is tight look at a used press. Check this one out:
http://m.ebay.com/itm/RCBS-JR2-SINGL...%257Ciid%253A4

I think you'd be happier in the long term getting something like this one.


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Old August 17, 2017, 11:50 AM   #61
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Quote:
Or how about the massive B52 Bomber. It's wings would flex 22' from the at rest position to in flight position and these things have been in service for 50+ years. So again I do not follow your line if you want to discuss "High Stress".
The full story on the B52 is that every part has been replaced many times. The wing spars and skin, the fuselage frame and skin, the landing gear and supports, the interior supports and even the seats. The current engines are much more reliable than the originals and they are routinely replaced.Aircraft are maintained on the basis of how many cycles the part has under gone. Aluminum parts can only be made to withstand just so many cycles before it fails whether it has been overstressed or not. Over stressing an aluminum part can cause immediate and total damage even though it was not stressed to the point of failure. Aluminum is a necessary "evil" in aircraft design and construction. It is the only material that is light enough and cost effective to use.

For presses you can use cast iron and steel engineered to last well beyond the life span in even hard use. There really is no comparison between a cast iron press and an aluminum press.

The aluminum bases on the Dillon presses fail after a period of use.
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Old August 17, 2017, 12:52 PM   #62
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Quote:
Both cast aluminum and cast iron can and do break and both are a pain to repair.
I can repair an aluminum casting and in some cases is better than it was originally, much, much harder to do on cast iron. As long as it's clean, cast aluminum is as easy to weld as a billet of the same mass.

It's nothing to TIG up an aluminum cylinder head with the appropriate rod and remachine it. Some damage to cast iron can be repaired with silicon bronze rod but it's not going to be like it was originally. Cast steel is a different animal though and is much more weldable than cast iron.

In any case aluminum presses have been around for a long time. I have several that I have owned for more than 30 years and still load match winning ammunition.
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Old August 17, 2017, 12:58 PM   #63
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To say aluminum or even a C style press can't load ammunition capable of benchrest levels of accuracy would be a false statement.

That said, the best ones are a bit different than the little Lee.

http://www.sinclairintl.com/reloadin...prod33635.aspx
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Old August 17, 2017, 01:20 PM   #64
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ShootistPRS, in 1974 I went thru US Air Force Tech school at Chanute AFB for aircraft maintenance training on the lovely B52 and then went on to serve with C141 Starlifters and C5 Galaxy's. Know all about them and their history. The stress loads they face will never be matched by a reloading press.
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Old August 17, 2017, 02:09 PM   #65
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No one has asked you, what are you loading handgun or rifle ammo ? I have a C press that has a universal decaper and I have decapped several thousands rounds of handgun and rifle rounds with no problems . If money is tight and your loading plinker rounds for handguns or smaller rifle calibers then buy it. Then later when you get the space buy a turret press and use the C press to decap.
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Old August 17, 2017, 02:18 PM   #66
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^ Loading handgun ammo, all with straight walls. Specifically .32, .45 Colt, and possibly in the future .38, 10mm, and .45 ACP.
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Old August 17, 2017, 02:48 PM   #67
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I would buy it then if your just loading hand gun ammo.your not going to over stress that press enough or ever to have it fail.
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Old August 17, 2017, 04:11 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rob-c View Post
I would buy it then if your just loading hand gun ammo.your not going to over stress that press enough or ever to have it fail.
And like I said, I'm likely only going to use it for mouth flaring and case charging, universal depriming, and possibly, but not likely, for Lee lube and sizing kits.
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Old August 17, 2017, 04:26 PM   #69
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LEE Press

I bought the whole package on sale and I will not say where.
I then purchased the complete 4 die set for reloading for my .270 and to me
the press system works fantastic.
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Old August 17, 2017, 05:18 PM   #70
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My opinion, which is worth what you paid for it, is that if it will work for what you want to do and you are happy with the price - then get it. From what you describe wanting to do, it should work fine.

I have a single stage of another design by another manufacturer - but I wanted a heavy duty do all single stage that could do just about everything and do it in perpetuity. There wasn't only one press for me to choose from in that category and I got the cheaper press - RCBS RockChucker Supreme than the Foster Co-Ax.

Lee makes very usable and affordable products - I love their carbide 45 ACP 4 die set. I don't think you can beat them for the price.

If I personally were getting a Lee press I think I would get the Lee Classic Turret - I don't own one but talking to people that do and reading all the reviews - I find it difficult not to agree that it is the best overall value in a press today.

I ended up with a Dillon 550 - but I paid a lot more.

My decision making on buying a press and reloading equipment is to wait and save for what I want rather than feel like I settle - and to buy something that I will continue to use and not have to replace later. But that's not the only or even the right way to decide. Plenty of people get what they can afford now and upgrade later. Not a thing wrong with that either.

Have fun and enjoy whatever you decide - there really isn't a wrong decision in your choices.
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Old August 24, 2017, 12:59 AM   #71
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I'm still thinking about whether to get the Lee Turret press or the C frame press, but I have been thinking that the Lee reloading stand wouldn't be a bad idea.

However, I've seen these Stack On benches and wanted to ask if they're any good? Given how small this bench is, I think I could find room in my tiny apartment to put it.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/58...ch-20-x-42-top
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Old August 24, 2017, 06:20 AM   #72
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I have a Lee Challenger press from the 90's, works good/fine for 204 & 223. I bought one of the breech lock versions a few months ago, like it a bit better in terms of de-priming since this model has the spent primer tube vs the small tray on the Challenger model. The breech lock version does induce some slop in the die which may or may not cause problems.

I have the FA reloading bench, the legs fold up for storage, has 2 folding shelves for more working space, I have both Lee presses mounted to it on opposite sides, and can pick it up and spin it around when wanting to use the other side. Very stable for what I load for (204 & 223).
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Old August 24, 2017, 07:11 AM   #73
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Quote:
However, I've seen these Stack On benches and wanted to ask if they're any good? Given how small this bench is, I think I could find room in my tiny apartment to put it.
I imagine you already have room to put it in your apartment all you need is a board and a c clamp or two.

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Old August 24, 2017, 07:14 AM   #74
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Another example that is cheaper and doesn't take up any additional space.

The top shelf of a closet is a goo place to put the press when not in use.

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Old August 27, 2017, 11:58 PM   #75
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OP- Don't do it.

Having a second press is *really* handy, but that C-frame is not very versatile, and is remarkably fragile. There are also dies that won't fit due to the depth of the throat, but not many.

If cost is the issue, I would look for used presses. They come up here and there.

The Lee turret is very nice. My only complaints are that the casting won't operate the eject collar on my RCBS primer swage, and like others noted- the auto index. It can be made to work, but it feels quite junky, prevents a little bit of flexibility. And for pretty modest benefit. Otherwise I am quite fond of mine.
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