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Old April 27, 2010, 02:07 PM   #1
.284
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Powder and manual questions

First, my two shooting/reloading pals and I are looking at Hodgdon Hybrid 100V. We found loads for three of our rifles, my 280, Al's 22-250, and Dale's 25-06. Looking for opinions/results concerning this powder.

Second, I am looking at getting a new manual and wondering if Lyman's manual is worth getting?
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Old April 27, 2010, 03:23 PM   #2
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I like the Lyman manual. It's pretty general purpose and will fill a need for information that goes beyond the load data itself. For data, I never trust just one source, because most sources have some errors in them. I try to find three sources of load data before picking the lowest start load from among them and work up. The powder company on-line load data is a good second source. I like to have a third, and used to use the bullet manufacturer's manuals for that. These days I often use QuickLOAD program for the purpose. Lee's Modern Reloading covers a lot of data and is often on the low side if you need another book source?
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Old April 27, 2010, 07:57 PM   #3
.284
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Thanks Nick

I agree with your suggestion. The Lyman manual would be a third source. Currently, I am using a Sierra manual as well as online sources. I tend to like data from powder companies over a bullet manufacturer. Hodgdon seems to be pretty good. I attribute that to the fact that they can put out data using Hodgdon, IMR, and Winchester. My buddy has ordered the Barnes manual but, that limits you to using their bullets exclusively. Do you have any opinion on the Hybrid 100V?
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Old April 27, 2010, 09:59 PM   #4
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I've not used Hybrid 100V. When it was due to be introduced the buzz was that it would make velocities possible that otherwise were not, but if the model in QuickLOAD is accurate, it just doesn't turn out to quite live up to the hype. The model could be off, but it matches Hodgdon's listed performance closely enough that it can't be too far wrong. The database shows compressed loads of Norma MRP, Vihtavuori N560, Ramshot Magnum (Big Boy), Accurate Magpro, IMR 7828 SC, and Reloader 22 all beat it by over 100 fps from a 24" barrel.
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Old April 28, 2010, 10:53 AM   #5
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The Lyman manual is a good resource. The front section is almost like "The ABCs of Reloading" with instructions on all the steps for loading rifle and handgun cartridges.

The only thing that I find curious is that certain loads are listed as max and show as being WAY below SAAMI pressure standards, while loads for other cartridges using that same powder will go to much higher pressures and much closer to SAAMI max.

I'm sure there's some reason for it, and I'm also sure that it's not unique to the Lyman manual.
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Old April 28, 2010, 03:13 PM   #6
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A lot of books list lead bullet target shooting data as max when the start to see leading rather than pressure signs. Others list maximums where they just can't squeeze any more powder into the case. That may explain some of what you've noticed?
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Old April 28, 2010, 03:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unclenick
A lot of books list lead bullet target shooting data as max when the start to see leading rather than pressure signs. Others list maximums where they just can't squeeze any more powder into the case. That may explain some of what you've noticed?
Here's an example:

357sig, 125gr Speer GD, Power Pistol: max listed as 8.7gr at 39,100psi.

10mm, 180gr Sierra JHP, Power Pistol: max listed as 8.0gr at 28,900 CUP (QL says 29,244psi)

Actually, the 10mm is a real mystery in the Lyman. All their loads are about 10,000 psi below SAAMI max, but they seem to run much closer to SAAMI max in some cartridges than they do others with the same powder, and with no indication of compressed loads.
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Old April 28, 2010, 04:30 PM   #8
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Thanks for the info guys. One of the reasons I am considering the Lyman as another source is that the Sierra manual seems to be very very conservative where as, Hodgdon doesn't seem to mind juicing up the loads. I tend to start at minimum (or just above) and work up looking for signs of pressure. I have never shot above a published load. I know plenty of reloaders do and I'm not saying they do it unsafely. That's just not in my comfort zone. There are so many factors that can change pressure. Shoot, I know I have seen (on this forum) guys that didn't realize a change in pressure will occur just by shooting a different firearm than the tested one from their data source.

Unclenick and Peetzakilla, thanks again, Jeff. Oh, and anything thing else that comes to mind feel free to post or PM. I welcome the advise.
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