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Old December 11, 2011, 08:41 PM   #1
toolguy2006
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Case trimmer/neck turner.

I received a Forster case trimmer with neck turning attachment as an early Christmas gift.

How tight a tolerance should be held for wall thickness after turning cases?

Also, should I trim brass after each firing, or only when the cases exceed max length? That said, how tight a tolerance should be held?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
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Old December 11, 2011, 10:18 PM   #2
savagelover
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I would like to know why your turning the cases? It is usualy a waste of time and brass unless you have a compition rifle and chamber...AS far as case lenght this is something you have to measure.sometimes they will stretch more than others and it makes a difference on the brand of brass..
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Old December 11, 2011, 10:23 PM   #3
4runnerman
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I trim my cases everytime. I have my trimmer set at one length and all fired cases go throught it everytime. Sometimes they get trimmed sometimes they don't,but they always go in it to make sure. As stated in previous post. Sometimes they grow and sometimes they don't. I have a cretian length i trim to. My cases after shooting are always in spec still ,but not to the length i want them to be at. Depends how carried away you want to get. Im 50 and have lots of time on my hands
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Old December 11, 2011, 10:27 PM   #4
hounddawg
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Case trimming and and neck turning are two different things. Use a case length trimmer when your cases exceed the cartridge specified length. But do make sure you do a light inside and outside chamfer after trimming to make sure you get the burrs off.

Case neck wall thickness is not affected by case trimming. That is done with neck turning and unless you are using a competition chambered barrel only use the tool to clean up the necks a bit as savagelover said. If you remove too much the you will work harden the brass in the neck when it expands during firing. Another problem is if you get it too thin some dies will have a hard time resizing the neck afterwards.
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Old December 11, 2011, 10:51 PM   #5
AllenJ
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Toolguy, that's a really early present but a good one too! I have a Forster also and I only trim to length when my cases exceed the maximun length listed in one of my reloading manuals. I measure each case after firing but if they are below the max I load them up again.

As for outside neck turning the only time I do that is when dealing with new cases. I set the trimmer to basically remove the thick side of the case mouth and leave the thinner side alone. I believe it has made a difference for the better in the accuracy I'm getting out of my reloads too, even though I'm only shooting them out of stock guns. Just my opinion.
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Old December 12, 2011, 12:10 AM   #6
toolguy2006
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I realize that length trimming and neck turning are two completely different things.

I learned the reloading process with a Forster trimmer that belonged to my brother, so it seemed the natural choice as I assemble my own gear. I decided to start turning case necks because that seemed like the next step in chasing group sizes. Also, since a neck turning attachment for the Forster trimmer is relatively inexpensive, it seemed like it couldn't hurt. I just now prepped a batch of brass to see just how effective turning the necks would be. That said, I only turned them enough to knock the high spots off, and uniform the brass. I borrowed a wall thickness micrometer from my machinist brother, and the turned cases are within 1/2 a thousandth or so.


Reloading seems to be one of those hobbies that is really easy to go completely off the deep end, and I was just curious what more experienced reloaders considered to be acceptable tolerances. That said, I do not own a particularly fancy rifle yet, though I would like one as finances allow.

Thanks all for the responses!
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Old December 12, 2011, 07:45 AM   #7
hounddawg
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Quote:
Reloading seems to be one of those hobbies that is really easy to go completely off the deep end, and I was just curious what more experienced reloaders considered to be acceptable tolerances. That said, I do not own a particularly fancy rifle yet, though I would like one as finances allow.
Although I grew up with them and my Dad taught me to shoot when I was in grade school I had not owned a gun in 20 years until I retired a couple of years ago and bought a .357 for a tackle box gun. That led to a Lee hammer loader..lets just say it sort of got out of control after that .

BTW good shooting guns don't have to be fancy, there are a lot of sub MOA rifles being sold for less than 500 bucks now. Stevens/Savage, Howa/Weatherby Vanguards, and Marlins just to name a few. Got to love CNC machining
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Old December 12, 2011, 02:27 PM   #8
243winxb
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Quote:
I only turned them enough to knock the high spots off, and uniform the brass. I borrowed a wall thickness micrometer from my machinist brother, and the turned cases are within 1/2 a thousandth or so.
I only measure the loaded rounds neck, .0005" sounds good to me. But then i use a Lyman turning tool. I do like to see a cut on 100% of the neck area. When trimming, wait till the brass gets to maximum, then trim.
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