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Old July 16, 2018, 02:33 AM   #26
Aguila Blanca
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I have to disagree with MTT TL and DaleA. "Mistake" and "error" are pretty much synonymous. When the shortstop bobbles a grounder and then throws wide to first base, they don't call it an "error" because he did it intentionally.

I agree that sometimes authors include incorrect or misleading information intentionally. When they do so, the information is "incorrect," it is neither an "error" nor a "mistake."
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Old July 16, 2018, 06:57 AM   #27
Jim Watson
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Stuart Woods, daddy of lawyer Stone Barrington, puts an afterword in his books.
Don't write to tell me about errors in this book, I already know about them by the time it is on your shelf.
He once commented that gun nuts are the worst for picking at details.
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Old July 16, 2018, 09:00 AM   #28
Skans
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Quote:
Many authors are just plain ignorant.
Fiction Authors tend to be "gun-dumb". Especially the ones from the liberal North East. I've caught some similar mistakes in Stephen King books. They are not writing for the people on this forum, they are creating sights and sounds through their choice of words to get non-gun people immersed in the action of the story.

However, you would think that people like Mr. King would know at least one gun-guy who could proofread his draft for silly gun errors. Gun-people aren't being "picky". It would be no different than writing something like:

"Jeff mashed the accelerator and redlined the 6.2 Liter V8 in his retro-styled '95 Plymouth Prowler before throwing the gearshift into 1st, smoking the back tires and launching it toward....."

Some of you will know what is wrong with ^^^^^this, and others won't have a clue. It sounds good to the average person, though.

Last edited by Skans; July 16, 2018 at 09:08 AM.
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Old July 16, 2018, 09:00 AM   #29
Aguila Blanca
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If an author can find the errors by the time his book reaches the buyers, why can't he find the errors before the book reaches the printer?

The problem is, a novel tells a story. At some level, the reader usually identifies with one of the characters (generally the protagonist) and, to a degree, suspends belief to become absorbed/engrossed in the situation. When serious errors pop up, they shatter the illusion and break the reader's absorption into the story line.

An example for sci-fi/fantasy: I was a huge fan of Anne McCaffrey and her Dragonriders of Pern series. I have every book in the series, and I've read most of them at least three times. Any time I went into a Barnes & Noble my first stop was the sch-fi aisle, to see if there was a new Dragonriders book out. Near the end of her life, Anne brought her son, Todd McCaffrey, in as co-author for one or two books. After she died, Todd wrote two new Dragonrider books in quick succession.

My late wife knew how much I liked Anne's books so she gave both of the new ones to me for Christmas. I read them both, and asked her never to buy another one of Todd McCaffrey's books. After almost thirty years of living on Pern in my head, I found that some elements of the story introduced by Todd were so jarringly out-of-synch with my mental construct of the Pern world that I absolutely hated the books.

I think the same thing applies to authors who allow serious, fact=-checkable errors regarding guns, cars, or whatever to creep into their books. True, some readers won't be knowledgeable enough to pick up on the errors. Others will.
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Old July 16, 2018, 11:08 AM   #30
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Actually Tom Clancy gave an interview after he wrote The Sum of All Fears about intentionally inserting bad info. He indicated he intentionally put in bad nuclear weapon design information to try avoid helping a terrorist group.
I was going to mention this, you beat me to it. Clancy's "interview" is actually the afterword in the book.
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Old July 16, 2018, 12:33 PM   #31
Brian Pfleuger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skans
...'95 Plymouth Prowler...
The concept was built in '93, production began in '97... but there may have been a couple unreleased "proof" models built in '95. Maybe he worked for Plymouth and got one

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aguila Blanca
When serious errors pop up, they shatter the illusion and break the reader's absorption into the story line.

An example for sci-fi/fantasy:...
I don't know... consider the myriad errors in the Star Trek genre, just around the concept of "Warp" and "Subspace" speeds/distances. It's pretty glaring at times. Hell, the whole Voyager series alone is FILLED with contradictions about how long it will take to go to X, how fast the ship can go, how long it will take a Subspace signal to get to Starfleet, etc, etc. It's noticeable by anyone paying the slightest attention, but I don't think it really detracts from the fan base.
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Old July 16, 2018, 08:41 PM   #32
Rob228
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Quote:
Actually Tom Clancy gave an interview after he wrote The Sum of All Fears about intentionally inserting bad info. He indicated he intentionally put in bad nuclear weapon design information to try avoid helping a terrorist group.
I was going to mention this, you beat me to it. Clancy's "interview" is actually the afterword in the book.
Clancy also said that the Tier 1 shooters in Rainbow Six never practiced on the range with their primary weapons because the diopter sights made them so easy to use.
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Old July 16, 2018, 10:44 PM   #33
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I can insert an error in to a line of code.

I can't insert a mistake.
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Old July 16, 2018, 10:53 PM   #34
SonOfScubaDiver
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It's fiction, people. Get over it.
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