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Old September 20, 2022, 07:22 AM   #1
chaim
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I don't have the tolerance for guns that are a pain to disasseble I once did

Anyone else notice their tolerance for designs that are a PITA to take apart is dwindling with age?

My main example is my SIG P290RS. I've had this gun for around a decade (plus or minus a year or two), it has been carried more than any other gun I own (when out of state on a UT non-resident permit), I shoot it well, and it is almost as comfortable to shoot at the range (and as accurate) as a much larger gun.

I recently (as in, it is still at the store waiting for the MD state 7 day waiting period to end on Thursday) bought a SIG P365 to commemorate my (soon to be) MD carry permit (I did the class and application, still waiting on processing of said application). Originally, the P290 was on the list of guns the P365 would replace, but I found myself finding excuses to keep it. I got it out and handled it and remembered how much I like it, I put in a laser training cartridge and went to town on some laser targets. Man, I like this gun.

Then... I tried to field strip it... As soon as I'm over my COVID isolation (I tested positive, I'm now waiting until tomorrow when current guidelines say I can go out again), I am taking this thing to a dealer and not looking back.

I remember when that didn't bother me, but that time is long over. From now on, any gun I am thinking of buying HAS to be reasonable to take down for cleaning. Now to test out my 1911s.
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Old September 20, 2022, 07:33 AM   #2
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The small hold open that came with the gun makes field stripping a P290RS simple and easy.

But the resonance in the trigger with every shot was more than I was willing to tolerate so they both (9mmLuger and 9mmKurz) went to Forever Homes.
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Old September 20, 2022, 08:33 AM   #3
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Two come to mind.

1990s Ruger Mark III? .22. This was before youtube, and I always had a heck of a time with it. Probably operator error, as many seemed to clean theirs with no problems.

1990s (maybe) Colt .45 OM with the double recoil springs. PITA for me.

Both are long gone.
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Old September 21, 2022, 09:08 AM   #4
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In the overall scheme of things a slightly more complex means of disassembly seems to be overblown but I share your issue. I hated taking down/reassembling my Ruger Mk pistols and my wife's Ruger LC9s. Yet at the same time I don't get aggravated at removing grips and 3-5 screws to get to the internals on my S&W revolvers. Makes a lot of sense doesn't it?
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Old September 21, 2022, 10:11 AM   #5
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Anything that requires a paperclip.
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Old September 21, 2022, 10:26 AM   #6
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From now on, any gun I am thinking of buying HAS to be reasonable to take down for cleaning.
What's your definition of "reasonable"??
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Old September 21, 2022, 03:19 PM   #7
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Ruger Mk. III lasted two range trips, then out the door.
Even with two or three youtube vids, it took a half-hour to get it together.

DISassembly isn't really the issue. Same with the '03 and '08 Colt pocket autos, which are notoriously hard to get back together. I fill mine with CLP, rack and snap for a while, then hose out with brake cleaner, and never take down beyond a field strip.
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Old September 21, 2022, 04:38 PM   #8
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1990s Ruger Mark III? .22. This was before youtube, and I always had a heck of a time with it. Probably operator error, as many seemed to clean theirs with no problems.
Not operator error. You have to insert the magazine, pull the trigger, beat it with a rubber mallet, turn it upside-down, put the magazine back in, beat it with a mallet, pull the trigger, shake it with it at a 45 degree angle then I think a Ouija board gets involved somehow.
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Old September 21, 2022, 05:05 PM   #9
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Wait till you get a Mauser 1910/1914/1934.
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Old September 21, 2022, 05:12 PM   #10
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The Mauser is simplicity itself.

Now I did let a friend borrow my Beretta 1935. He apologized when he brought it back admitting that he hadn't been able to find out how to field strip it for cleaning. Wanted me to show him the button or lever or pieces part to get the slide off to remove the barrel.
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Old September 21, 2022, 07:18 PM   #11
chaim
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What's your definition of "reasonable"??
Trying to field strip it doesn't cause pain in my diabetic fingers as a minimum baseline.
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Old September 22, 2022, 12:29 AM   #12
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The easiest semi auto pistols I have are the Browning BDA45 (Sig P220) and the Desert Eagle.

Interesting enough the Desert Eagle is the easiest of the two. You don't even need to lock the slide back to do it. On the other hand, its NOT the easiest gun to rack the slide on.....

Though I have some that are worse.
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Old September 22, 2022, 06:46 AM   #13
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I switched over to the easy to field strip, easy to clean Glock pistols in 1985 - back when I was a young man. This decision has paid dividends as I age.
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Old September 22, 2022, 10:00 AM   #14
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PITA; is relative !!

Quote:
Anyone else notice their tolerance for designs that are a PITA to take apart is dwindling with age?
I think so but then again, I have yet to find one that is all that bad. I enjoy helping buddies, by cleaning their firearms. Yes, some are easier than others but then I gain more experiance which is of value to me. ......

I'm a Ruger fan and for years I read about how hard the MK-Family was to take apart. I did some homework and saw a video where a fella claimed he could do a disassembly/reassembly, in 15-seconds. Well, I decided to revisit my HK-II and got to the where it took me 30-seconds. So that is one devil, I dehorned. I have no desire to own an MK-IV and find them less attractive than the rest of the family. .....

Be Safe !!!
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Old September 22, 2022, 10:55 AM   #15
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The old Ruger .22 pistol is why they invented the bore snake and when you learn not to clean a .22 pistol until the accuracy falls off.

That said, the thing to do is take it apart and then right back together. Three times. By the 3rd time, it just seems easy. Once you know how to hold it so the parts fall into place.

The legend of how hard they are to reassemble can grow- people are afraid to buy these older models and that means lower prices for the rest of us.

I’ve solved the problem of this difficult to reassemble thing by depopulating my gun safe as I get older. If it’s not a favorite, it goes. Somehow I still need another safe.
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Old September 22, 2022, 11:07 AM   #16
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I know the feeling. I have a Ruger P97DC 45acp. It is a joy to shoot and not bad as a carry pistol. Kinda like a Commander on steroids. It is a breeze to field strip but a bit of a PITA to reassemble. The ejector has to be positioned correctly and if it is moved down accidentally I have to use a hooked wire through the mag well to get it back up, But there is also another glitch that prevents easy reassembly which is hard to explain. A weird thing is this is not common to all P97s but some owners report the same.

Ruger MKII 22/45 can also be a pain if you are not paying attention but it doesn't really need field stripped very often.
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Old September 22, 2022, 11:48 AM   #17
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That said, the thing to do is take it apart and then right back together. Three times
OR, you handle it the way I did. You don't take it apart unless you NEED to.

My Wife's Mk I Target Ruger turns 40 next year. Its about my favorite semi auto .22 pistol. It has had thousands of rounds through it, and its been taken apart, TWICE.

Once, by me, shortly after I got it,(back when I was younger, and I like to think, dumber) and once about 20 years ago by he who is now my EX son-in-law.

when he asked to borrow the gun, wife said, "ok, but, don't take it apart". I told him "don't take it apart". He took it apart, could not get it back together and hid the fact from us....

After some months of asking my daughter for the gun back SHE finally told us what he had done, and apologized, returning the parts in a grocery bag. Fortunately all the parts were there, and I put it back together.

One of the many reasons he is now my EX son-in -law...
Eventually I reached the point in my life where I recognized the wisdom in the lesson of Frankenstein, "He meddled with things man was meant to leave alone..."

Guns designed for military use, or designed with the hope of military use are designed and built to be taken apart and put back together, over and over, by GIs, and survive.

Civilian guns, and particularly older designs were never made for that. IF the gun is difficult to disassemble and reassemble, consider the idea that it was made like that for a reason....

Neglect is bad for your guns, too much of the wrong kind of care is as well.
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Old September 22, 2022, 02:03 PM   #18
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"Not operator error. You have to insert the magazine, pull the trigger, beat it with a rubber mallet, turn it upside-down, put the magazine back in, beat it with a mallet, pull the trigger, shake it with it at a 45 degree angle then I think a Ouija board gets involved somehow."

I remember that rubber mallet action.

Early on I decided to spare my rubber mallet from getting chewed up from whacking that .22, so I found a piece of 2 x 4 about a foot long and used that instead. I was tempted to include it with the gun when I sold it, but figured it was a bad idea.
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Old September 22, 2022, 03:52 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Carmady View Post
"Not operator error. You have to insert the magazine, pull the trigger, beat it with a rubber mallet, turn it upside-down, put the magazine back in, beat it with a mallet, pull the trigger, shake it with it at a 45 degree angle then I think a Ouija board gets involved somehow."

I remember that rubber mallet action.

Early on I decided to spare my rubber mallet from getting chewed up from whacking that .22, so I found a piece of 2 x 4 about a foot long and used that instead. I was tempted to include it with the gun when I sold it, but figured it was a bad idea.
Only a bad idea if the two by four was drilled and tapped so it could be used like a stock.
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Old September 22, 2022, 09:54 PM   #20
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You could just change over to revolvers.
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Old September 22, 2022, 10:38 PM   #21
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My revolver's (SP101) cylinder is completely frozen, so now I'm going to have to take it all the way apart to clean. Checking out the YouTube videos and that's as big a pain as some of these other guns. . .
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Old September 22, 2022, 11:56 PM   #22
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My revolver's (SP101) cylinder is completely frozen, so now I'm going to have to take it all the way apart to clean.
Maybe, or maybe all you need to do is remove the cylinder. Some years ago a friend brought me an SP 101 with a cylinder that would not turn. Well, actually, you could turn it by hand, but it would not spin.

Not being familiar with that gun, I did resort to looking up how to take it apart. When I got the crane out and the cylinder off, the crane was covered in a black build up, and that was the problem. Apparently that part of the gun had never been cleaned, and crud just built up until it bound up the cylinder.

Thorough cleaning of those parts solved the problem, there was nothing else wrong.

Not saying its the problem with your SP 101, but it is something to look for.
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Old September 23, 2022, 05:14 AM   #23
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For me it was a beautiful little Savage 1907 .32acp I once had. I didnt have the patience for the nonsense that gun required.
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Old September 23, 2022, 06:34 AM   #24
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Reliability, capacity, shootability, carriability, and æsthetics far outweigh field strippability.
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Old September 23, 2022, 01:08 PM   #25
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I don't mind the Ruger MKII. Could be a little more user friendly, but it doesn't frustrate me.

The one I resent far more is the S&W 622 family (.22LR semi auto). It came with a special plastic tool to make the field strip practical. Lose the tool, and the field strip suddenly becomes an instant nightmare, or you can use a spent .22LR casing, which can potentially leave permanent marks on the aluminum frame. The design just pisses me off.
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