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Old March 19, 2017, 03:30 PM   #1
john.h.ortego
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Stoeger sxs muzzle brake?

So a few weeks ago my dad and I and my friend went to a fundraiser skeet shoot for a lady in our hometown to help defray medical costs for an accident she was involved in.
It was a 100 round course, plus the warm up games we played, so just short of 150 rounds each.

On top of that, my dads wingmaster 870 had a mechanical failure so that means we ran about 300 rounds through my stoeger double barrel. At that many rounds not only is it now broken in, but by the end of it neither of us wanted to shoot it, since it was as my dad put it, "like shooting with a 4x4" (timber).

So the question I'm leading into is, are there muzzle brakes available for my shotgun, which has screw-in chokes, to help mitigate some of the recoil. I've seen the brakes on other (admittedly very high end) double barrels. I've done a little research but I haven't seen anything discussing if stoeger barrel threads are different than other brands.

I plan to put a recoil reducing pad on the butt if these competition shoots become a regular thing for my dad and I. I only have the one shotgun so using something else for skeet shooting is out. Here's a picture of my baby for the long-winded post.


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Old March 19, 2017, 04:33 PM   #2
jaguarxk120
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Muzzle brakes work by directing gases to the side or sometimes angled to the rear.

They work best on high pressure rifle rounds by reducing the jet effect.

Shotguns work at lower pressure's and anything you screw into the barrel just won't work that well.

Reduce recoil by using lighter loadings, or add weight to the gun.
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Old March 19, 2017, 05:40 PM   #3
AKexpat
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Quote:
On top of that, my Dad's wingmaster 870 had a mechanical failure so that means we ran about 300 rounds through my Stoeger double barrel. At that many rounds not only is it now broken in, but by the end of it neither of us wanted to shoot it, since it was as my dad put it, "like shooting with a 4x4" (timber).

So the question I'm leading into is, are there muzzle brakes available for my shotgun, which has screw-in chokes, to help mitigate some of the recoil. I've seen the brakes on other (admittedly very high end) double barrels. I've done a little research but I haven't seen anything discussing if Stoeger barrel threads are different than other brands.

I plan to put a recoil reducing pad on the butt if these competition shoots become a regular thing for my dad and I. I only have the one shotgun so using something else for skeet shooting is out. Here's a picture of my baby for the long-winded post.
You are a bit vague about your Dad's 870 failure. I worked at a now non-existant place in Norfolk Nebraska (Roberts' Shooting Park, on the property of Roberts' Dairy Farm: It is now the site of a Community College) in 69'-70', pulling and setting for trap and skeet, for $1.50/hr., no bennies. I used an 870 exclusively for skeet (12 gauge IC choke, 26" barrel). Never had a problem with it. Rem 870's are pretty much bulletproof so it should be an easy fix.

When I was a teenager in the 60's my Dad had two Fox Sterlingworth doubles with double triggers, and neither had a recoil pad. The 20 gauge (choked mod and IC) weighed about 5 lbs., had a large drop at the comb, and would beat one to death in one round of skeet with target loads. Great to carry in the field for birds if one only had to kill one every so often. The 12 gauge was heavy and was choked mod and full, so I never shot it much.



Quote:
Muzzle brakes work by directing gases to the side or sometimes angled to the rear.

Shotguns work at lower pressure's and anything you screw into the barrel just won't work that well.

Reduce recoil by using lighter loadings, or add weight to the gun.
I shot skeet with a friend back then who had a beautiful Winchester Model 12 20 gauge field grade with a Cutts Compensator. Very nice shotgun but with the Cutts it was LOUD, and I don't know how much it cut the recoil. (Those were the days when not many folks cared about hearing protection, and as pullers on the skeet/trap field, we had to hear the "pull" commands.) I shot it for one round of skeet, but I preferred my 870 with the weight and the gauge, and Mike was very good with the 12. He beat me every time and we never, ever, went 25 straight.

Sorry, old time rememberences.

Jim
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Old March 19, 2017, 07:27 PM   #4
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The Cutts were a law unto their own. Guns that had them installed usually shot very tight patterns. The shot swarm would open slightly and even out inside the Cutts tube, then hit the choke and be thrown together. The swarm or shot string is very tight and long, most guns with them shot like rifles. The Cutts compensator and choke system is the origin of the Tula choke.

And yes they are very loud, how well they work I do not know.
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Old March 19, 2017, 08:06 PM   #5
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I put a mercury recoil arrester in the buttstock of my IGA Stoeger SXS. It takes the sting out of the gun but adds a bit of weight to the stock.
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Old March 20, 2017, 02:43 AM   #6
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Under the rear plate here should be a hole to access a screw to remove the rear stock. You can add weight in that area to help with the recoil. Some fill those areas with lead shot. If they make a screw on recoil pad for that shotgun you should pick one up or try a pachmayer slip on.

Last edited by Blindstitch; March 20, 2017 at 02:51 AM.
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Old March 20, 2017, 04:36 PM   #7
4V50 Gary
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A smith with a mill and a rotary indexing dividing head can port it. Don't use that hand-drill porting jig from Brownell's. The original design was good but when Brownell's subcontracted out production, the manufacturer got lazy and instead of making all the holes perpendicular to the centerline of the bore, drilled them out at the same angle. The appearance is funny with some holes appearing oblong. The best way to do it is to use a milling machine with the rotary indexing dividing head. Perfect every time.
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Old March 20, 2017, 05:47 PM   #8
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Porting shotgun barrels is a waste of time and money and does nothing to reduce recoil. The easiest way to reduce actual recoil is to shoot lower payloads at slower speeds in a heaver gun. Porting does do two things - it makes your gun louder for folks standing nearby and it makes the person making the holes richer.

You can add lead tape under the forearm and take an empty shotshell or two and fill them full of lead and put them in the buttstock under a good recoil pad.

Felt or perceived recoil, aka "kick" is a function of gun fit. It sounds like it doesn't seem to fit your dad very well.
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Old March 21, 2017, 12:37 PM   #9
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i would have the forcing cones lengthened,,,that will help reduce felt recoil

just my .02

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Old March 21, 2017, 01:00 PM   #10
Hellgate
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Ocharry,
The forcing cones on my IGA Stoeger coach gun are tapered quite a bit compared to my Stevens 311 that was designed for paper hulls and has abrupt tapering.
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Old March 21, 2017, 07:24 PM   #11
ocharry
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Yes I agree they are tapered, ,,, I was suggersting to have them lengthened like the trap guys,,,, maybe 2 1/2- 3"

It will make a difference

I also agree that a mercury recoil reducer will help a lot too,,,, if its installed correctly

I always use the dead mule mercury reducers, ,,, I think thats the name of them,,,, I get them from brownells,,,,, I think thet are 7/8" diameter and about 4" long,,,,, they work good


just a thought

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