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Old July 11, 2020, 08:02 AM   #1
Pond, James Pond
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Does rainy weather make for quieter shooting?

Basically, I was curious as I my country cabin is in a hunting area. You do hear shots ringing out now and then.

Whilst most people won't be rushing outside in bad weather, I'm pretty sure it won't deter a hunter who's out to harvest meat.

Yet, I don't remember the last time I heard anyone shooting during rainy weather.

Is it because rain absorbs the sound more, or are the hunters simply staying dry?
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Old July 11, 2020, 10:03 AM   #2
TX Nimrod
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Higher humidity actually raises sound transmission slightly, so you should hear more noise. But the rain itself causes sound which can mask other noise. Temperature inversions effect sound transmission. Bottom line, you probably hear less on a rainy day because less noise is being generated.

https://www.abdengineering.com/blog/...s-noise-study/

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Old July 11, 2020, 10:14 AM   #3
Bart B.
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Yes, raindrops absorb a small amount of sound.

Last edited by Bart B.; July 11, 2020 at 10:22 AM.
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Old July 13, 2020, 12:56 PM   #4
Erno86
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Low cloud cover keeps sound cadged from escaping into the upper atmosphere.

For example: If a train whistle sounds louder on low cloud cover day than a clear one --- It signifies that rain is potentially on the way.
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Old July 14, 2020, 10:33 AM   #5
Bart B.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Erno86 View Post
Low cloud cover keeps sound cadged from escaping into the upper atmosphere.

For example: If a train whistle sounds louder on low cloud cover day than a clear one --- It signifies that rain is potentially on the way.
Why do we hear airplane's loud engine noise when they're flying way above big storm clouds dropping lots of rain?

For audible sounds the wavelength of the sound is much longer than the diameter of raindrops, individual raindrops are thus "invisible" to the sound wave, and therefore you may treat air with rain approximately as a uniform medium. Sound waves we hear are between .67 inch to 670 inches long. Rain drops and droplets are smaller:

https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/w...ifferent-sizes

Last edited by Bart B.; July 14, 2020 at 11:28 AM.
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