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Old February 8, 2019, 10:14 PM   #1
saleen322
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Winchester Model 100 Rifle

We happened into a model 100 Winchester in 308 for a shotgun trade. I had heard of the 100s but never shot one before. The last 308 (7.62 NATO) autoloader I shot was a M-14 in the Marine Corps. The previous owner said it had been a family member's and not been shot for years. I took it apart, cleaned, and lubed it before taking it out to shoot. The other neat thing I liked about it was the steel tubed Sears scope from that period that looks like it was made by Weaver.

During the cleaning I saw it had the old style firing pin that was recalled by Winchester. The last model 100 was made around 1973 and the serial number on this one puts it around 1969 so I didn't know if the recall was still being honored or not. So we call the phone number and a person picks up without any automated response. I ask about the recall and she checks the serial number and says that one was not changed. I send in the old style firing pin and get the corrected one AND about a week later I get a check for $30 from Winchester to help offset installation costs in case I pay a gunsmith to put it in.

The rifle looks good, shoots as good as a lot of bolt guns, and it ejects the empties to almost the same spot every time. The recoil feels more like a 243 than a 308 so anyone could shoot this thing. Very good rifle and it makes you wish you knew about them sooner.


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Old February 9, 2019, 08:08 AM   #2
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You hit the wood jackpot with that stock! Most I've seen around here have all been very plain with very little figure. I sure wouldn't pass up a good deal on one, but they just aren't seen in my parts very often. Congratulations!
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Old February 9, 2019, 10:52 AM   #3
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Great looking rifle. I'm in love with the lines of the Winchester 88 and 100 and I feel that they are some of the most beautiful rifles made. As I'm fond of leverguns, I have a '59 Winchester 88 also in .308 and like you, I'm pleasantly surprised with it's great hunting accuracy with both my 150 and 165grn handloads.

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Old February 9, 2019, 11:47 AM   #4
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I've had several Winchester 100's and loved them all. Its a shame they quit making them. I guess production cost of making them got to be too much.

My go to deer rifle is a 100 carbine in .308. With my hand loads it shoots 1.5" groups, plenty accurate for a deer rifle in Northern WI.

About 15 years ago, I replaced the tiny extractor spring with a slightly stiffer one in all three of my Win 100's. This provided a firmer hold on the case rim by the extractor and better ejection. After that I never had a failure to feed issue with any of them.

Maybe ten years ago, I re-posted here glass bedding instructions for the Win 100 rifle. Its a four step process which greatly improves accuracy. See thread http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=273781

Last edited by wachtelhund1; February 9, 2019 at 11:56 AM.
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Old February 9, 2019, 03:41 PM   #5
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I killed my first Michigan deer with a Model 100 rifle, chambered in .308, 54 years ago. Imo, the Model 100 is the best semi-automatic, hunting rifle ever made-the Browning BAR being a close runner-up.
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Old February 9, 2019, 04:47 PM   #6
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The 100 is an awesome deer hunting rifle. Mine has put a lot of venison in the freezer over the years. The ONLY negative about it is that you need 3 hands to remove the action from the stock for service on the action. Keep its magazines locked up as they are very costly to replace. I have 2 original mags and 2 eight round mags for it. I cant remember where I got the 8 rounders - I just use them at the range.
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Old February 9, 2019, 09:57 PM   #7
saleen322
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Quote:
Maybe ten years ago, I re-posted here glass bedding instructions for the Win 100 rifle. Its a four step process which greatly improves accuracy. See thread http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=273781
Thank you for providing this. I was going to try and bed the recoil block because that seemed to be key in getting better accuracy. I had the screw loose to align the sling swivel and it was less accurate but when you tightened the screw down, the groups shrank. The link you provided has much more information and that is now on the to do list.
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Old February 9, 2019, 10:03 PM   #8
saleen322
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Thanks guys for the complements and advice, it is appreciated. Steve, that is a great looking model 88! Around our area they bring top dollar.

Quote:
The ONLY negative about it is that you need 3 hands to remove the action from the stock for service on the action.
Amen to that! I kept thinking I was doing something wrong but you just need to fine tune the amount of compression on the action to get it to fall in. It is still a work in progress with me.
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Old February 10, 2019, 03:02 AM   #9
wachtelhund1
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Disassembly of the Win 100 just takes a little practice. Remove the two action screws and the one sling swivel screw. Remove magazine. If you are right handed hold the tip of the forearm of the stock in your left hand. With your right hand, draw the bolt handle all the way back with web of your right hand. When the bolt is all the way back, with the thumb and index finger of your left hand raise the barrel out of the front of the stock, at the same time pinch the action with the right hand and lift the action and barrel out of the stock. Action and barrel has tp be at a 30 to 45 degree angle to get it out and set it into the action. Heel of the action comes out last and goes in first. I completely strip and clean my 100 before the deer season and after the deer season, even though I only fire two shells most years; one for a fowling shot and one at the deer.
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Old February 11, 2019, 02:14 AM   #10
bamaranger
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very nice indeed

No doubt about it, the 88/100 series Winchesters were handsome rifles. No Monte Carlo or cheek piece, white line spacers, or anything else that was becoming the rage during the era they were in production. Plain, clean lined and sleek, absolutely gorgeous. Not only do they look good, for me, they shoulder and point very nicely too.

VERY interesting to note that the OP got a real person on his firing pin inquiry, and that the part needed was provided along with a check (unheard of) to cover any costs.
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Old February 11, 2019, 04:19 PM   #11
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Most Winchesters made during that era were "classics" in terms of their general aesthetics from stem to stern. Though I had both and loved them equally, I do think the Model 100 had a better trigger pull than the Model 88; not because the Model 100 had such a good trigger but because the Model 88's was so bad.
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Old February 11, 2019, 05:20 PM   #12
hub1home
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Me Too!

I've had a Winchester Model 100 for over 30 years. It is one of the best rifles that I've ever shot. Mine has the same stock as yours! In regard to the recall, Winchester had me send the whole rifle back to their designated repair shop. It took about 2 weeks. Mine definitely needed the recall because twice it fired 2 shots with one pull of the trigger. That scared the crap out of me! Mine was made 1964. Other than the double firing, I have not ever had a problem with it. I gave it to my son about 4 years ago. He lives with me so I still call it mine. I don't hunt anymore but he does and has struck pay dirt with it every time he hunted with it! I sure wish that I could find a model 88 in the same or better condition but they seem to be just as cherished as the 100.
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Old February 11, 2019, 05:47 PM   #13
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My 1st brand new deer rifle was a Rem 742 in 30/06. I was very disappointed in the accuracy of it and sold it. I picked up a nice used 100 in 308 on a trade and was surprised at the accuracy of it. Function was slick and fit and finish was nice. I shot 110gr for varmits
and 150s for deer. I've had several in 308 and one 243. The 243 was ok but not as accurate as the 308 models. All mine were pre 64s.
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Old February 11, 2019, 07:03 PM   #14
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My buds brother had 3 of them. A .243, 284 and 308. Unfortunately they were stolen when he wasn't home. He thought he knew who had them but was unable to prove it.

Nice rifles. And I like the basket weave impressed checkering that some of them had like the OPs gun.
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Old February 11, 2019, 07:48 PM   #15
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Quote:
And I like the basket weave impressed checkering that some of them had like the OPs gun.
And I'm just the opposite: I much prefer the hand-checkering the earlier rifles had. Each to their own.
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Old February 11, 2019, 07:54 PM   #16
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Winchester 100s are nice looking guns, generally shoot OK (just OK), but when I was younger they had bling status around my group of friends. They were ooooooh coooool. I see them as definite period pieces, there are better guns out there now, but I do love shooting the oldies. Congratulations!
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Old February 12, 2019, 01:10 AM   #17
bamaranger
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twist rates

My heirloom Win 88, a very early one chambered in .308, has a 1-12" twist rate, and I suspect the Model 100's do as well. That is in contrast to the 1-10" rate seen on a lot of .308 rifles these days.

Back in the day, the belief in my clan was that the ideal .30 caliber bullet weight was 180 gr's and preferably a RN design. But one of my early shooting success and learning stories was to discover that my old Model 88 shoots 150 gr slugs WAY better than 180's, and I attribute that to the slower twist rate. If you are experiencing so-so accuracy with your Model 88-100, and are shooting .30 cal slugs on the heavy end of the scale, try 150's, you may be darn glad you did.
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Old February 12, 2019, 05:57 PM   #18
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Quote:
My heirloom Win 88, a very early one chambered in .308, has a 1-12" twist rate, and I suspect the Model 100's do as well
We have an 80's Win 70 HB in 308 that also has the 1-12 barrel. I haven't checked the Model 100 but I would expect the same. My experience with 308s is the 1-12 is very good up through 168 grains.

As far as accuracy, our model 100 is the only one I have experience with and it seems to be under 2" @ 100 yards after I fooled around with the front sling screw tension. We also have four 40X Remingtons so yes, there are rifles that group better but for a hunting rifle the mod 100 is fine IMHO. The techniques kindly shared by wachtelhund1 are much more in depth that what I had thought of and I intend to try them. It does make sense looking at them because you can't bed the 100 like a bolt gun because of the gas system components in front of the receiver. The model 100 is a nice rifle but I am sure it would be too expensive to make now.
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