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Old March 26, 2019, 11:09 PM   #26
tangolima
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Join Date: September 28, 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RC20 View Post
If your bolt lugs actually change over time, you are in peril of a blow out. Head space gauges is there to check the initial set and if you do a barrel change.



If you bolt lugs are wearing so is your lug recess in the chamber. If you find the head space is acualy increasing then its time to replace the rifle or have it repaired (there is one operation that does it but its probably a waste of good money)



Loose lugs (and or lug recess) = movement = more movement= more movement

until a lug shears.
All guns develope excessive headspace with use. Hot loads speed up the process. Most, if not all, of them don't blow up before stop functioning; misfires, head separations etc.

Excessive headspace can certainly be repaired effective and efficiently. Setting back barrels has been bread and butter for many smiths for long time.

-TL

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Old March 27, 2019, 12:35 PM   #27
F. Guffey
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Quote:
Loose lugs (and or lug recess) = movement = more movement= more movement

until a lug shears.
I have bolts that look new with the lugs sheared off, I have bolts that look new with large cracks between the lug and bolt. I do believe it would be easier to take you seriously if you did not try to tell other members everything you know about ever topic.

If a shooter is waring out a rifle I would think the first thing to go would be the chamber/throat In the form of erosion.

And while I am thinking I would think there would be a member that has been around long enough to have heard of the "Lifetime rifle plan", there was a time a shooter could purchase a rifle with a life time warranty. For a fixed price they would bore your barrel and rechamber it when it wore out nd at the same time they would set the barrel back.

Without preforming the thankless job of digging this information out I will guess; It seems Easton Ackely made the offer. And? I thought the prices were reasonable. They suggested starting with a small diameter caliber and work out.

Point? If rifles wore out like you describe there would be nothing to repair by the time they progressed from 25/06 to 270W.

F. Guffey

.
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Old March 28, 2019, 09:58 AM   #28
cw308
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nino
All that info sure cleared up things , made me feel like a turtle , hide my head and close up shop. Some questions I guess have no simple answer. For some reason I think you knew the answer , just wanted to give us things to talk about . Hope everything is going well .

Chris
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Old March 28, 2019, 03:31 PM   #29
F. Guffey
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Quote:
then started hearing about shoulder bump.
Because it is a cute and catchy term reloaders have an infatuation with it, it saves them from knowing what they are doing.

I have said it is latterly impossible to move the shoulder back with a die that has full case body support; because I am consistent I also find it impossible to bump the shoulder back with a die that has full case body support. Just ask them; "How do you do that?"

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