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Old August 27, 2018, 08:07 AM   #1
PAJoe1022
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My New Scope vs. My Old Scopes

Yesterday I went over to Dick's Sporting Goods to shop for a scope for my new Ruger 10/22. It only took one 45 minute trip at the range to realize the factory sights weren't going to do it for me.

So I did a little research online and based on all the reviews I read, I decided on a Nikon Prostaff Rimfire II 3-9x40 with BDC reticle and bought a pair of Leupold Rifleman high mount rings for the Weaver rail that comes with the Ruger.

I got it all mounted up, but probably won't make it to the range until this weekend.

Now the only other scopes I've ever had were Chineseium "Center point" brand 4x32s that came on a couple Crosman break barrel pellet rifles I had. They were horrible. It would take 50 shots to zero them in, if (and I mean if) you could get them zeroed at all. Then once you got them zeroed, after about 50 more shots, it would be off again (presumably from the vibration of breaking the barrel to load and pump it. Or if you let it sit for a week and came back, you'd need to zero it again. Also they were useless at night, the light transmission was terrible. They actually felt decent, they were aluminum, weighed a good bit, they didn't fog up, the lenses were pretty scratch resistant, they just weren't accurate at all. You can still buy the exact same 4x32 "Centerpoint" brand scope at Walmart for like $30.

So this Nikon being the first scope I've had that cost more than $30, what can I expect in terms of difficulty zeroing it in, and how long can I expect it to hold zero? I plan on zeroing it at 50 yards. I know it's still a fairly basic scope, but I'm not gonna buy a scope that cost more than the gun. Also, any tips for sighting it in?

Thanks!
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Old August 27, 2018, 08:34 AM   #2
TXAZ
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First you need to make sure it's been mounted properly. Lots of youtube videos show you how to do that. The goal is to virtually bond it to the rifle, so connecting points need to be mounted to where they have full purchase of the rail and scope, and tight, but not too tight. The scope and rings should have info on how tight.

I like to boresight mine at 200 yards, which is a very easy to line up the barrel and scope. For that you need a good (not $15 cheap ebay boresighter in your caliber). That's about 80% of the effort right there taken care of if you go that route. If not, proceed, off to the range. Start with a big target relatively close, 25 - 50 yards. Make a couple shots, adjust the scope, when it's close, go for whatever your zero distance is and move the target out there. Repeat.
Again, lots more details in some of the youtube videos.
Good luck!
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Old August 27, 2018, 11:24 AM   #3
RC20
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200 yards? My god its a 22!

Ok, for some down to earth advice. Depends on how much you want to spend.

Low Cost: Take scop0e and rifle to range, find out what the closest they will allow you to shoot at (22 ranges may allow closer, rifle ranges often 25 yards) go with the 22 range if you have that choice, or 10 -15 yards.

Put a large target up, shoot, adjust, shoot, and repeat until its close (1 inch is fine) to your aiming point.

Then move the target out to 25 yards. Repeat above but work it to 1/2 inch.

Then move it out to 50 yards and get it as on as it gets (10/22 are not usually not tack drivers)

Higher Cost:

Get the bore laser thingy and do the same but you can start at 25 yards and get the dot and the scope on the same point.

Then shoot, adjust as previous.
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Old August 27, 2018, 12:13 PM   #4
jmhyer
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Provided that the scope is mounted properly and everything is nice and tight, it should hold zero indefinitely.

In terms of how to get it on paper and zeroed, I would suggest some YouTube videos such as this one.

https://youtu.be/mUNxR9RvZ5s

Of course, you won't be able to boresight your 10/22 the old fashion way, because you can't look down the bore. You could purchase a laser bore sighter; however, I don't really find that necessary. In my experience, If you start at 10 yards, doing it like the video demonstrates above, should work just fine. You would only have problems if you start out way off paper. That can be overcome by using a larger target or moving the target closer.
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Old August 27, 2018, 01:48 PM   #5
zukiphile
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXAZ
For that you need a good (not $15 cheap ebay boresighter in your caliber).
Quote:
Originally Posted by RC20
Low Cost: Take scop0e and rifle to range, find out what the closest they will allow you to shoot at (22 ranges may allow closer, rifle ranges often 25 yards) go with the 22 range if you have that choice, or 10 -15 yards.

Put a large target up, shoot, adjust, shoot, and repeat until its close (1 inch is fine) to your aiming point.
I split the difference.

You can use a very cheap boresight/laser at home so that you are on paper when you get to the range. Then you can adjust for your ordinary range. You may find that a 10/22 zeroed at 50m will be only a quarter or half inch low at 25m.
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Old August 27, 2018, 02:12 PM   #6
RC20
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The reason I fine tune at 50 is that its take out the 25 yard variable left and right.

Some are prettify well spot on both depending on the velocity.
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Old August 27, 2018, 03:08 PM   #7
jmr40
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Quote:
200 yards? My god its a 22!
I shoot my 10-22 at clay targets placed on the berm at 200-230 yards every range trip.

But the BDC reticle won't help you with a 22 much past 100. The bottom aiming point will just about be right at 100 with a 50 yard zero. You'll just have to experiment. Different ammo makes a huge difference too.

I use a scope with adjustable dials. With mine zeroed at 50 yards I used the trial and error method to figure how many clicks to get zeroed at 100 and 200. I have to spin the turrets one full turn and then 16 more clicks to be zeroed at 200.

If I have a decent scope that tracks properly I'm zeroed with 3 shots and shouldn't need to change it. With most scopes one click moves POI 1/8" at 50 yards. All I have to do is fire one shot at 50 yards and calculate how many inches I'm hitting from the POA. If the 1st shot is 2" low and 3" right then I move the turrets 16 clicks up and 24 clicks left. Shot #2 should be perfectly zeroed, but it often takes one more to fine tune the scope exactly where I want it.

But you need to read the instructions with your scope. Most tell you the distance each click moves the POI at 100 yards at 1/4" per click. But at 50 yards that would be 1/8" and at 200 yards it would be 1/2" per click. Other scopes move POI 1/2" at 100 yards which would be 1/4" at 50 and 1" at 200.
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Old August 27, 2018, 04:59 PM   #8
ligonierbill
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I haven't tried the Pro Staff rimfire, but I had one on my AR for several years. It's now mounted on a .257 Roberts rebarreled Mauser. Sighted in with a few (like 10) rounds and always held zero.
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Old August 27, 2018, 09:27 PM   #9
2ndtimer
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I have had that very scope mounted on my M&P 15-22 for the past 5 years. IMO, it is a decent scope for the price. It has held zero, and proven effective on ground squirrels at .22 rimfire range. I usually use it on lower power for critters, but 9x for shooting off a bench.
To me, the more puzzling question is why any gunowner would even enter a Dick's store? You realize that company actually hired a couple of lobbyists to promote attacks on our second amendment rights?
It would be the last place I would spend money, unless they were selling items below cost so that purchasing from them would drive them out of business faster.
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