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Old May 27, 2022, 08:23 PM   #26
gns4me
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SP-101 3"
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Old May 27, 2022, 08:27 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by 44 AMP View Post
I seriously doubt you will overstress a properly made .357 Magnum revolver by putting a .357 load in a .38 Special case.

The .357 was created using .38 special brass in the S&W N frame revolver. The longer magnum case was created for production ammuntion, to prevent its use in .38 Special guns which could be overstressed by the high pressure load.

It wasn't done to make the case longer to hold more powder, though it also does that.

If the gun was built for .357, putting a .357 load in .38 brass won't break it. HOWEVER, shooting that load in a .38 Special revolver might.

The .38 Special (aka .38 S&W Special - which is a completely different cartridge than the .38 S&W) was created with black powder, and there are still guns around that were made during the black powder era. The pressure level of the .357 Magnum can damage or even destroy those guns, with consequent risk to the shooter.

I've always felt that putting .357 loads in .38 brass was an accident waiting to happen. If you own a .38 a brief moment of inattention can put your gun and you at risk. And, if there is even the remotest chance that someone else has or will have access to that ammo, (not knowing what it really is) you're putting them at potential risk as well.

The most common scenarios suggested are your shooting buddy or your kids grab some ammo from the "wrong box" (the magnum stuff in .38 brass) and shoot it in a .38. Or your heirs do...

Either way, could be bad for them.

.357 brass isn't "unobtainium" there's a lot of it out there, even if current supply & delivery issues mean you can't get the brand new stuff you want today you can get it. I think being a bit patient is better than potentially creating a boobytrap for yourself, or someone else.
Agreed More of a learning exercise for me than storage.
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Old June 2, 2022, 03:55 PM   #28
Nick_C_S
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Subject drift . . .

I thought of this post today at the range. Why? Because as soon as I got there, I found about 30 pcs of like-new Starline - yes, Starline - 357 Magnum brass. I collected them for sure.

Somewhat coincidental, considering today's trip to the range was with one of my 357 Magnums (686+ 3"). And yes, all my ammo was with Starline brass.

Who dumps Starline brass? Could have been a factory boutique brand that used Starline, I suppose. I have seen that before (I think Buffalo Bore??)
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Old June 2, 2022, 04:48 PM   #29
mehavey
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OK... I was going to wait until I had both cast & jacketed... but what the heck:

Last Saturday:


Two Notes:
- Plain Base (even beveled) handled > 30,000psi w/ Powder Coat (shaken, not stirred)
- Both grouped 3/4-7/8" at 50Yds (Lyman Aperture/Tang sight)

PostEdit: Make the case volumes grain/H2O (not cc). sorryboutthat.

.

Last edited by mehavey; June 3, 2022 at 08:17 AM.
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Old June 3, 2022, 07:31 PM   #30
akinswi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick_C_S View Post
I thought of this post today at the range. Why? Because as soon as I got there, I found about 30 pcs of like-new Starline - yes, Starline - 357 Magnum brass. I collected them for sure.

Somewhat coincidental, considering today's trip to the range was with one of my 357 Magnums (686+ 3"). And yes, all my ammo was with Starline brass.

Who dumps Starline brass? Could have been a factory boutique brand that used Starline, I suppose. I have seen that before (I think Buffalo Bore??)
I was at the range yesterday and literally there was 300 to 400 FN 5.7x28 cases laying on the ground that someone blew thru alot of ammo not to mention money I thought about picking thh herm up but then …. I remembered how those cases have a special coating on them and its a chore to reload them no thankyou . I quietly stepped over them.

I only pick up 38special and 357 now. The single thing I love most about shooting my 586 is dumping those spent cases into my carry pouch and dont have to hunt for them in the dang grass.
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Old June 4, 2022, 10:05 AM   #31
Nick_C_S
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dumping those spent cases into my carry pouch
You got that right! And every year that goes by, it becomes more important. I truly enjoy shooting revolvers and not having to collect brass off the ground is icing on the cake. Revolver ammo is more fun to load too.

These days, it's rare to find revolver brass on the ground at the range. When I first started shooting (1983), I went to a range where nobody cleaned up - it was a mess. There was 38 and 357 brass all over the ground. 9mm was fairly common too (and some 45 ACP), but not as much as the revolver stuff. Times have changed. At that time, if I wanted more cases, I'd just bring a coffee can with me and fill 'er up. It was that easy.
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Old June 8, 2022, 12:11 PM   #32
robinny
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 44 AMP View Post
I've always felt that putting .357 loads in .38 brass was an accident waiting to happen. If you own a .38 a brief moment of inattention can put your gun and you at risk. And, if there is even the remotest chance that someone else has or will have access to that ammo, (not knowing what it really is) you're putting them at potential risk as well.

The most common scenarios suggested are your shooting buddy or your kids grab some ammo from the "wrong box" (the magnum stuff in .38 brass) and shoot it in a .38. Or your heirs do...

Either way, could be bad for them.
Hasn't he already solved that issue by loading them at .357 Mag COL?
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Old June 8, 2022, 02:52 PM   #33
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Properly Labeled (and controlled) I don't see the same level of concern.
As to "... a shooting buddy or your kids grab[ing] some ammo from the "wrong box" ...,
that is a violation of BOTH conditions.

Note below:


The Label above goes on the box.
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Old June 8, 2022, 02:58 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by robinny View Post
Hasn't he already solved that issue by loading them at .357 Mag COL?
Maybe, but probably not. Most bullets aren't seated out to Max COAL. .38 Special max OAL is 1.550 and .357 is 1.59.

.357 brass is longer which usually (not always) prevents it from seating into a .38 Special chamber, however most .357 rounds would otherwise fit into a .38 Special cylinder without tying up the gun.
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Old June 8, 2022, 06:07 PM   #35
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Quote:
Properly Labeled (and controlled) I don't see the same level of concern.
As to "... a shooting buddy or your kids grab[ing] some ammo from the "wrong box" ...,
that is a violation of BOTH conditions.
Sure it is, and if you can properly control access to the ammo, like a lot of things when properly controlled, it won't be a problem.

The problem happens when you DON'T have complete and proper control. No one intended to lose control but sometimes, despite the best intentions and all precautions it happens.

I see loading .357 level ammo in .38 Special cases as a risk no one needs to take. Feel free to disagree...
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Old June 8, 2022, 06:13 PM   #36
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With the Lyman 358156 and NOE bullets that have a upper and lower crimp groove ... if you load the bullet in a 38 special case and crimp it in the lower crimp groove the shoulder is now at the same place as if loaded in a 357 magnum case and crimped in the upper crimp groove .
It was designed this way for a reason ...
So loaded , 38 special case , #358156 crimped in the lower crimp groove ...
that round is too long to chamber in a 38 Special chamber .
If not ...how many fools would have blown up 38 special handguns with these loads ? Lyman still catalogs this bullet design and I've never even heard of a lawsuit ...
Load up a few and check it out they don't chamber in my S&W model 64 - 38 special ... the bullet shoulder stops it from chambering ... also looking at the loaded round sorta tips you off ... bullet sticking out of the case ...it's long !
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Old June 9, 2022, 01:43 AM   #37
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.how many fools would have blown up 38 special handguns with these loads ? Lyman still catalogs this bullet design and I've never even heard of a lawsuit ...
I can't tell you how many, if any have actually blown up or just broken, but I can give you some reasons why you don't hear of lawsuits because of that happening..

First, just WHO are they going to sue??
No manufacturer warranties their gun with reloaded ammunition. And for the very reason here, the maker has no control over what the user puts in the gun.

No point in suing the ammo manufacturer when its a handload that you made and put into your gun....

Can't sue the component makers or reloading data providers, they all have warnings, disclaimers and instructions on how to proceed safely, and especially because you have no proof that you correctly followed them, only your word and since you have financial interest in the lawsuit, your word alone isn't enough to prove you aren't at fault and they are...

Bottom line, if you made the handload and it damages your gun or you, You and only you are the party at fault.

If a factory load does it, you may have a case against the ammo maker and possibly the gun maker but if its your handload, you don't.
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Old June 10, 2022, 11:50 AM   #38
robinny
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Bottom line, if you made the handload and it damages your gun or you, You and only you are the party at fault.
Being the party at fault isn't much of a deterrent against suing people these days.
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Old June 10, 2022, 01:06 PM   #39
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Being the party at fault isn't much of a deterrent against suing people these days.
Nothing seems to be...but I cling to the hope that being the party at fault is generally a deterrent against winning damages from someone not at fault.

Possibly why I wouldn't be allowed on a jury....
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