The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old February 4, 2019, 07:43 PM   #1
jugornot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 20, 2017
Posts: 194
Precision Rifle Blog: Reload like a Pro

Article

An overall summary of article:

Vast majority handload

Brass Prep:

A significant majority anneal

A slight majority Neck turn

Significant Minority clean primer pockets

Minority uniform primer pockets

Very small minority weigh sort brass

Bullet prep:

A minority point bullets

Very small minority weight sort bullets

Even smaller minority trim meplat

A couple of the pros coat bullets

Charging:

Slightly less than a majority use an expensive scale measure powder

A couple less use "standard" scales to weigh their powder

A very few use powder throws without weighing

Given the majority here are not professionals (maybe a bad assumption on my part.) What do you include in your reloading? And considering this dates from 12/2015, how do you think this may have changed? It should be updated soon.
__________________
More money than sense
jugornot is offline  
Old February 4, 2019, 08:53 PM   #2
Dufus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 10, 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,733
I started hand loading in April, 1963....almost 56 years ago. Most of my habits were all "learned" by at least by 1975. Why should I "updated soon"? Everything works as well now as it did then.

I took great pains in every detail, from seating primers to truing bullets and making my own bullets with some heavy duty swaging presses. Over time, I weeded out the steps that made little to no difference. That includes swaging bullets. There are some outstanding consistent bullets available across the counter.

Every one develops their own techniques and methods. I won't tell anyone what not to do or what to do. If they ask what I do, I say so with explanations as to why and how.
Dufus is offline  
Old February 4, 2019, 09:36 PM   #3
hounddawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2009
Posts: 2,437
I just started shooting club level a year ago so certainly no expert here. I have went from around 85% - 90% aggregates to 95% - 97% aggregates during that year with some small changes in gear and simplifying my reloading procedure and simply concentrating on uniformity

I don't do anything fancy. I pay a lot of attention to primer pocket uniformity and having my primers seated firmly. I trim necks, chamfer and deburr every firing. I like a good bit of neck tension and use full length bushing dies with the expander removed. My powder is loaded to plus or minus .02 gns and my loads are developed so that I have 10 to 15 times that much leeway for temperature fluctuations and powder charge variations.

Seating is done either with a Wilson inline on a arbor press or micrometer die on the RC. I recently started using Imperial dry lube again but that is more for the feel than any effect I have noticed on paper. I occasionally check concentricity and tweak anything above .001 in if possible on match ammo
__________________
“How do I get to the next level?” Well, you get to the next level by being the first one on the range and the last one to leave.” – Jerry Miculek

Last edited by hounddawg; February 4, 2019 at 10:09 PM.
hounddawg is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 01:18 AM   #4
jugornot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 20, 2017
Posts: 194
m
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dufus View Post
I started hand loading in April, 1963....almost 56 years ago. Most of my habits were all "learned" by at least by 1975. Why should I "updated soon"? Everything works as well now as it did then.

I took great pains in every detail, from seating primers to truing bullets and making my own bullets with some heavy duty swaging presses. Over time, I weeded out the steps that made little to no difference. That includes swaging bullets. There are some outstanding consistent bullets available across the counter.

Every one develops their own techniques and methods. I won't tell anyone what not to do or what to do. If they ask what I do, I say so with explanations as to why and how.
I was posting that the article should be updated soon because it is three years old. Not that anyone should update their method soon. I used to shoot FGMM and Black Hills Match. I can do better handloading now.

Truly I expected this as the normal answer. Seems to me the handloading crowd is splitting now. On one hand the majority handload out of tradition and economy' while another group loads for accuracy and consistency with some crossover between the groups. I was attempting to get a very rough idea about the spit. I am not trying to tell anyone how to reload. You actually sound like somewhat of a crossover by describing your meticuousness.
__________________
More money than sense
jugornot is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 01:41 AM   #5
jugornot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 20, 2017
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by hounddawg View Post
I just started shooting club level a year ago so certainly no expert here. I have went from around 85% - 90% aggregates to 95% - 97% aggregates during that year with some small changes in gear and simplifying my reloading procedure and simply concentrating on uniformity

I don't do anything fancy. I pay a lot of attention to primer pocket uniformity and having my primers seated firmly. I trim necks, chamfer and deburr every firing. I like a good bit of neck tension and use full length bushing dies with the expander removed. My powder is loaded to plus or minus .02 gns and my loads are developed so that I have 10 to 15 times that much leeway for temperature fluctuations and powder charge variations.

Seating is done either with a Wilson inline on a arbor press or micrometer die on the RC. I recently started using Imperial dry lube again but that is more for the feel than any effect I have noticed on paper. I occasionally check concentricity and tweak anything above .001 in if possible on match ammo
Dawg you, I would put in the accuracy and consistency group. What brass do you use for your matches? I left off the info on number of rounds shot per year. There seemed to be a broad sweet spot from 1000 to 8000. How much do you shoot. Finally how much of your improvement do you attribute to your improvement and how much to loading or shooting equipment?
__________________
More money than sense
jugornot is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 05:34 AM   #6
std7mag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 23, 2013
Location: Central Taxylvania..
Posts: 2,548
Dawg,
0.02 of a grain? I'm keeping mine within 0.1gr and am happy.

Alas most of my rifles are of the hunting variety. Yup the ole "pencil thin" barrels.
But i still like to stretch it out.
I don't do a lot in my reloading steps as compared to some people. Consistancy is key.

Also, i attribute my shooting better to reloading because i shoot more.
__________________
This country was founded on two beliefs.
And I'm pretty sure pork rinds was one of them!
std7mag is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 08:24 AM   #7
hounddawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2009
Posts: 2,437
Quote:
Dawg,
0.02 of a grain? I'm keeping mine within 0.1gr and am happy.

the max resolution of the scales I use is .01, they are inexpensive so linearity is no better than .02 grain in either direction. For example a 37.5 charge may weigh anywhere between 37.48 and 37.52. Depending on how flat a node I am working with I may try to get exactly on 37.5 or I may call 37.48 or 37.52 good on any given charge so that would throw me potentially farther off.

If you have good load development with a flat velocity node + or - .1 gns should give you sufficiently consistent velocities for shooting even at 800 and 1000 at club level matches. Just my opinion of course, I am not a professional shootist but it seems to be working for me at least at my current level.

Hopefully in a year or two I can justify a more precise scale, honed dies and a custom built rifle but at this point in my learning curve I think consumables are my best investment
__________________
“How do I get to the next level?” Well, you get to the next level by being the first one on the range and the last one to leave.” – Jerry Miculek
hounddawg is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 04:59 PM   #8
jugornot
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 20, 2017
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by hounddawg View Post
Hopefully in a year or two I can justify a more precise scale, honed dies and a custom built rifle but at this point in my learning curve I think consumables are my best investment
Can't remember the brand but read someone would custom grind neck for you for like $10 or$15. So that plus the cost of the die ain't bad.
__________________
More money than sense
jugornot is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 07:12 PM   #9
RC20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 10, 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 6,031
Keep in mind this is long range shooting vs say to 300 yard bench rests.

That shorter range is me, partly it suits me and its also what I have available.

If HD is going to go finer he needs to get his grain cutting tool first!

I tend to fall in best in a lot of those groups but not all. Annealing yes but every 5 rounds. But then I don't expect to make anyone happy but me. 1/2 and under is a fine result. Also realistic.
__________________
Science and Facts are True whether you believe it or not
RC20 is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 07:44 PM   #10
hounddawg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 1, 2009
Posts: 2,437
@ Jugornaut - I shoot anywhere between 50 to 100 rounds a week centerfire and lately double that in 100 and 200 yard rimfire. I think I am getting more consistent in both my loading and shooting technique has led to me being more consistent on target. Bear in mind I am a rookie at competition, only one year in. I use Lapua, Peterson, or Alpha brass and change the brass when I change barrels. I just try and keep my brass consistent.

@RC my powder I weigh to .02 grains but my scale can be off .02 in either direction so I am within 3 kernels. If you want to get into kernel cutting you get a scale that has .0001 gram resolution. I am pretty sure most of my loads fall into the same tenth of a grain and that seems good enough for me.

I rode the target cart out with one of the members the other day and he was shooting 5 shot third to quarter MOA groups at 600 yards. I had scales on my mind that day and asked what he measured his powder on. RCBS Chargemaster double checked on a beam he bought in 1980.
__________________
“How do I get to the next level?” Well, you get to the next level by being the first one on the range and the last one to leave.” – Jerry Miculek

Last edited by hounddawg; February 5, 2019 at 07:50 PM.
hounddawg is offline  
Old February 5, 2019, 08:35 PM   #11
cw308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2010
Location: Plainview , Long Island NY
Posts: 3,352
I'm a 200 yard shooter only , maximum distance in my neck of the woods . I'm with Dufus and dawg on my reloading only small differences , I don't use heat , bushing dies and Im one of those die hards that still use the expander . Have one center fire , Rem. 700 in 308 use the same bullet 168 Sierra MK one powder IMR 4064 each grain is .02 Shoot 30 rounds every range trip averaging 600 - 750 rounds per season . Once I found a reload the shot consistently accurate I stayed with that and practice on my shooting form to tighten my groups .Made some changes along the way , dies , measuring tools and brass cleaning from dry to wet . When I find what works whether it's in reloading or shooting l stick with it .I also added this forum to my list , Great Group of Guys .
cw308 is online now  
Reply

Tags
pro. hadloading , reolading

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06559 seconds with 10 queries