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Old January 25, 2019, 02:59 PM   #26
HiBC
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Necessary?
The Olde Buffalo Hunter was loading up tomorrow's ammo without a dial indicator long ago.
Is a chrono necessary? Is a powder measure or a progressive press necessary?

You can make ammo,good ammo,without them.

But some Handloaders want to go farther.They have questions that an indicator can answer.Or they have theories to test.

I worked with someone who would say "Indicators don't lie,and liars don't indicate."

Dial indicators are very useful and versatile measuring and comparison tools.

By themselves,they don't do much. But a person who knows what they are doing can set them up and use them for many things.

If you wanted to measure your press flex or stretch,an indicator can be set up.

If you have a comparator stand or surface plate,a Wilson Bushing Cartridge Headspace Gauge (As the manufacturer calls them)has a square ground end,on the neck end.That can be set on the flat of a granite comparator stand.The insde of the bushing gauge has a shoulder that represents the SAAMI headspacing datum feature.A cartridge case dropped in the gauge will rest on the datum feature.

The upper surface of the bushing gauge is at a height of SAAMI max length.

The indicator can be zeroed on this surface. Cartridge cases can be dropped in the bushing and quickly sorted or checked. The handloader can shoot for a desired result,such as -.003 from SAAMI max.

The dial indicator will often be used with other tools that represent a datum,such as a surface plate,vee block,bench centers.

It can be used with a surface plate and precision gauge blocks for a qualifying measurement.

That Mahr "Swede Gauge" setup shown above will show variation in jacketed bullet diameter and roundness in terms of .xx millionths of an inch...and an operator running a centerless grinder might inspect his parts with one.

A person can use a surface plate,some 1-2-3 blocks ,a height gauge and an indicator to precisely set up a series of dies in a Dillon toolholder plate.

I'd use a multi-anvil mic with the anvil and clamp removed,myself.

Do you need indicators to reload? Not particularly. If you know what you are doing,can you use dial indicators handloading? Absolutely.
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Old January 25, 2019, 11:41 PM   #27
higgite
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And with a good indicator holder, you can use the indicator to monitor how many thousandths you move the seating stem on a standard seating die as you adjust it up or down. Or you could just buy a micrometer style seating die for each caliber that you load. Choices are great things to have.
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Old January 26, 2019, 01:37 PM   #28
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Quote:
And with a good indicator holder

Its possible the "as cast" painted,rounded surfaces of a press won't offer a good surface for a magnetic base or a clamp type indicator holder to work.

Some presses are aluminum. If you look at where the structural strength of your press is,you can find a place to drill and tap a 1/4 20 or 10-24 hole in your press casting.


You can then take a piece of stock,like maybe 1/2 by 1/8th cold rolled,or,what you have,do a little bending and drilling to make a bracket that you can attach to the drilled and tapped hole(s) and your indicator back. You can design one that will hold your indicator in optimum position.


If you re-enforce your bench top with plate of cold rolled under your press,you have a flat,secure spot for a magnetic base.


Point is,if you have an indicator,there are MANY ways it can be used.


Machinists "tram" the head of a mill square,perpendicular to the table by sweeping the mill table with an indicator mounted to the spindle.


They square a vise by traveling the table with an indicator on the fixed jaw.


They locate over a diameter by putting an indicator on the hole or pin and rotating the spindle.


In a lathe,we tune runout out of a 4-jaw chucked round part with an indicator.

A clever guy can actually set up parts pretty accurately in a drill press using a piece of wire chucked in the spindle like a crude indicator. You can sweep the table to square it. You can center up on a feature by bending the wire to nearly touch the feature,then turn the spindle 180 deg. Move your workpiece 1/2 the space between the wire and the part. Repeat. Just as with a sight picture,your eye can center a small gap very accurately.Add a jewelers loupe,


You might position to .002 or .003 pretty easily.


Its about seeing where one would be useful.
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Old January 26, 2019, 06:33 PM   #29
higgite
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Quote:
Its possible the "as cast" painted,rounded surfaces of a press won't offer a good surface for a magnetic base or a clamp type indicator holder to work.
Having a hobby lathe and mill makes it easier to work around those limitations.

Quote:
You can then take a piece of stock,like maybe 1/2 by 1/8th cold rolled,or,what you have,do a little bending and drilling to make a bracket that you can attach to the drilled and tapped hole(s) and your indicator back. You can design one that will hold your indicator in optimum position.
My version isn't exactly like that, but similar. Same principle.
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