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Old February 9, 2017, 08:44 PM   #1
Joe-ker
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How many of you fuss with crimped primer brass?

Since my brass reserves aren't as plentiful as I wish them to be, I saved some 5.56 nato I shot recently not realizing at first they were crimped. A little time spent hand deburring and testing by seating used primers and it doesn't seem too bad- I'm small time so it's only 100rds. Just curious if many even waste the time. I know I'll be a little more attentive when I purchase in the future now that I'm reloading again.
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Old February 9, 2017, 08:46 PM   #2
chris in va
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I have a Lee crimp remover tool that removes it in a couple twists, so yes it's worth it.
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Old February 9, 2017, 08:58 PM   #3
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I use the rcbs military crimp remover for mine.
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Old February 9, 2017, 09:32 PM   #4
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I load on 3 Hornady LNL's so when they came out with the pocket swager for 223 and 308 I jumped on them.I can't imagine doing it any other way now.Did a 1000 the other day in no time flat-I'd have to say as far as reloading is concerned it's the best money I've ever spent..Of course this only helps you out if you load on a LNL..
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Old February 9, 2017, 09:57 PM   #5
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I have thousands of crimped cases including WCC 9mm cases that i had to remove the crimp . I would rather not have to do it but i get the cases pretty cheap . I even bought 1k of WCC-12 9mm cases that clearly had what looked like a. crimp but not one of them needed swaging .

That first case prep session takes quite a bit more effort .
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Old February 9, 2017, 10:07 PM   #6
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All military cartridges are crimped. It's a requirement to prevent primers popping out in full-auto guns and jamming them up. But look around on the web and there are lots of folks selling it because a lot of people don't want to pay for new brass. You can buy it already "processed", so it has been cleaned and resized and the primer crimp removed. You can even buy it re-primed. But all these extra services cost you something.

I've been using a Dillon 600 primer pocket swager for about 25 years. Works great.
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Old February 9, 2017, 10:11 PM   #7
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BY THE BUCKETFUL
Dillon swager and a couple of hand reamers (chucked in a cordless drill)
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Old February 9, 2017, 10:19 PM   #8
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Brass is brass.

If it's crimped small primer pocket brass, I run a reamer in just a little, to remove burrs or sharp edges. Then it gets swaged with a CH-4D crimp removal tool.

If it's larger primer pocket brass, I use a case mouth chamfering/deburring tool or primer pocket reaming tool to cut the crimp from the pocket. (I do have a larger pocket swaging tool in the CH-4D kit. I just usually don't need to get it out, due to small lots of brass.)

Once fixed, you never have to touch the crimp again.
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Old February 9, 2017, 10:23 PM   #9
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I have de crimped tens of thousands of rifle rounds with my Dillion Super Swage.


https://www.dillonprecision.com/supe...8_8_25263.html

Though I have used the spay blade on a stockman knife to cut the crimp out of 5.56 mm brass.
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Old February 9, 2017, 11:42 PM   #10
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I've swaged 1000's of military .223/5.56 and 30-06 brass cases with the inexpensive RCBS Swager dies.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/235...swager-combo-2
Note it works only on rams that are 1" or less. The case stripper has to go down over the ram. Best reviews go to Dillon's Swager. RCBS makes a benchtop model too.
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Old February 10, 2017, 12:15 AM   #11
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Crimped primers are a good way to get good brass at lower prices. Most reloaders don't want to deal with them and will pass on buying them. It's a one time thing that you have to deal with and then never worry about it again.

I use a chamfer to do all the brass that needs to get done and then a primer pocket uniformer if needed. Staked primers are usually the worst as the chamfer can bounce over them, you have to go easy on these to do them right. Ring type come with their own set of issues because it can push the chamfer more to one side.

So buy away and just take the time to get it done right, whether it's using a chamfer tool or a swagging tool. Good luck and keep us posted on how you're doing.
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Old February 10, 2017, 07:10 AM   #12
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Worth it to me. I actually use LC brass for a match load in F-Class when I want to piddle around with my .223.


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Old February 10, 2017, 09:02 AM   #13
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I was ahead of the shortage curve when it involves 223. Bought a dealers case of Bulk Winchester brass 2-3000 pcs back in the late 90s. Couple hundred dollars I believe I paid for that bulk case. Since I shoot a Rem Model 7 223 I do believe in my lifetime I'll never see the bottom flaps of that 223 box. Although old reloaders habits kinda override what I should be doing. >Let fly!!
"Yep I Still pick up my once fired brass"
So to answer the OP question Do I bother with Military crimped brass? Oh hell NO.
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Old February 10, 2017, 01:59 PM   #14
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Dillon swage has been my stand by for years now after years of trying most of the short cheap tricks you read about on reloading sites.
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Old February 10, 2017, 02:50 PM   #15
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I'm on the wagon with the rest of the guys, Milbrass is high quality 'Range' brass that with a little work can be 'Match' grade brass.
I buy it 2,500 to 3,000 pounds at a time.

Hand cutting primer crimps is a little time consuming and can be hard on the hands,
BUT,
You only do it ONCE, from then on throughout the life of the brass it's trouble free high quality cartridge brass that will serve you well.

If you are only doing 100 at a time, then hand twist tool,
If you sit down and do 500 or 1,000 at a time, spend the money on a bench mounted swaging tool (under $100 most times), makes the job MUCH easier.

*IF* you get into several thousand at a time, get a progressive press that supports auto swaging (like Dillon Super 1050)
No sense in buying more than you need, $20 to $2,000 depending on volume done...

I would stay away from 'Case Processing Centers', the motorized contraptions that have several rotating tools hanging out in space.
It's not the rotating tools, it's the fact there are no guides (other than your fingers/eyeball) to keep the brass true & square on the cutting tools.
Oddball, out of square cuts are common...
When you reach the point of 'Needing' something like that, there are better ways of doing all functions that 'All In One' unit does.
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Old February 10, 2017, 04:15 PM   #16
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I use a primer pocket reamer on a Franklin Case Trimmer for fast, efficient "decrimping". Haven't noticed a problem with the "oddball" cuts mentioned above.
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Old February 10, 2017, 04:51 PM   #17
Joe-ker
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I buy it 2,500 to 3,000 pounds at a time.


Holy cow Jeephammer!!!!!!. You're a small army LOL! But seriously, thanks for all the replies. I think I'll just stick to my hand reamer for the little amount I plan on doing. I was a little concerned about reaming too much and primers might not have a deep enough pocket. I've been checking them by sliding a paper clip to make sure there is a smooth edge on the pocket and quitting there.
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Old February 10, 2017, 06:01 PM   #18
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Primer pocket swagers are fine but....
there's yet a better way:
From time to time members have indicated that they use an electric drill and drill bit for the job. This seemed dubious and archaic at best until finally giving it a try. I have the swager tools as mentioned but they are not consistent and still result in some scraped primers as they are being inserted. So why not give the drill bit method a try? Doing that, it worked perfectly and does not overcut the primer pocket and provides an exact fit without a single scraped primers. I have used the method with large primer pockets only and a 15/64 inch drill bit. A 3/16 inch bit should be right for small primer pockets. Give that a try if hand reamers are not satisfactory enough. Note that you don't drill down the depth of the pocket, just enough to remove the crimp as determined by eyesight. Wear gloves when doing this task.
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Old February 10, 2017, 08:10 PM   #19
Metal god
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I use the drill my self and IMHO it's as fast as any other method . I have the drill in my left hand . I size and or decap with my right and when the case is pulled from the shell holder it goes straight to the drill to remove the crimp . I did 700 223 cases in an hour last month . That included depriming . That's one every 4 or 5 seconds , again including depriming at the same time . I was happy with that .
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Old February 10, 2017, 10:45 PM   #20
zeke
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I don't fuss with them, just swage out the crimp on Dillion and continue on.
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Old February 10, 2017, 11:00 PM   #21
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I use a lot of crimped (military) brass. I don't find it difficult to work with at all.
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Old February 11, 2017, 01:39 AM   #22
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"BY THE BUCKETFUL
Dillon swager and a couple of hand reamers (chucked in a cordless drill)"

I do this as well. You can pick up a small reamer that will chuck into your cordless drill at the home depot for 5 bucks. It's a conical shaped deburring bit that looks like an inside chamfering tool. I can remove primer crimps twice as fast as my electric case prep center this way. Just make sure the pitch is correct. I brought in a piece of brass to compare to the tooling before I purchased it.

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Old February 11, 2017, 02:12 AM   #23
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I recondition brass on a volume/commercial scale.
I have half million sitting around at any given time...

If you are removing crimp and worried about primer depth, you are doing it wrong...

Crimp removal is just cutting or mashing the crimp out of the way.

Depth or hole size issues are when you use a primer pocket 'Uniforming' tool.
That's a cutting tool that reaches up into the primer pocket,
To cut that primer pocket a specific size in diameter,
Or specific depth from head (head stamped surface is the 'head').

Depends on brand/maker of brass,
Some primer pockets are die formed, pressed into the brass when the brass is pressed out of a 'Cup' of base material.

Other brands of brass have primer pockets that are cut with a cutting tool.
Most are pressed, simply because it saves the manufacturer a machining process and the fixtures/cutting tools & time.

When I'm processing once fired brass or manufacturing brass from base stock the customer will order a specific size primer pocket or flash hole size (for a specific primer they intend to use).
That ALWAYS costs extra!

Existing (once fired) brass you can 'Bump' the primer pocket around a little, but it takes a very powerful and accurate press to do it correctly.
There isn't a press like that on the common market, the common market presses simply 'Swage' the primer pocket so a common primer can be reinserted.

Machining takes a very specific clamp to hold the brass in place for a specified cut to take place accurately,
Which is why I DO NOT recommend the 'All In One' case processing centers for that particular reason, no guides or clamps to center, lousy off center/strange angle cuts.

Doesn't matter if you cut or swage the crimp lip as long as the process is self guided/self centering.
You simply aren't taking that much off and you aren't taking material from anywhere that's 'Critical' for strength.

I've built machines that do both cut or crimp, and I can't tell a lick of difference as long as you don't cut/swage anything BUT the crimp lip.
No strength or accuracy changes at all.

The only warning is, if you power cut, don't get stupid...
Use a limiter that keeps you from cutting too deep, you are only *Supposed* to be removing the lip...
Guys using angle reamers & counter sink tools in drills get carried away, which is why I recommend mounting the drill and developing a positive stop of some sort.
This is usually cheap & easy, but I see guys doing it free hand all the time & generally with no consistancy at all....
They simply won't take a tip from a tool & die maker, spend a few extra bucks and/or slip a piece of tubing into place over the cutting tool to limit depth of cut.

To each their own, if it works for them, then more power to them.

Last edited by JeepHammer; February 11, 2017 at 02:18 AM.
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Old February 11, 2017, 03:41 PM   #24
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About 75% of all the brass I own is military "once fired". It is a one time deal to remove the crimp (all my brass was "de-crimped with a countersink) and actually really simple and fast. My ex-military brass is 9mm, 45 ACP, some 38 Specials, 7.62x51, 30-06, and IIRC, a few 7.62x39. I figger I'd have about 2,000 fewer cases if I didn't reuse mil surp...
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Old February 12, 2017, 06:01 PM   #25
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So I started out on 5.56 brass on a case prep center with the "crimp remover" bit that comes with it.

I found that the primer pocket tension varied a great deal more than normal and was very inconsistent. Yes, I reamed out too much brass that is the point.

Got the Dillon Super Swage and never looked back. It works great and primers are much tighter and more consistent now. Well worth the $100.

I have done several thousand cases now without issues....
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