The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: General Handgun Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old November 22, 2018, 07:02 PM   #51
jmr40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 15, 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 9,521
Interesting reading, but that was 42 years ago. A lot has changed.

Rock6, if you're still following the thread, I've been to several places in your photo's. Springer Mt and Rough Ridge. Killed a bear near that Rough Ridge trail sign many years ago. And that area is FULL of bear. I wouldn't hike there without a gun suitable to stop a black bear.

My choice if black bear are in the area is a G29 loaded with 200 gr hardcast bullets. If no bear a smaller 9mm will do just fine.
__________________
"If you're still doing things the same way you were doing them 10 years ago, you're doing it wrong"

Winston Churchill
jmr40 is offline  
Old November 22, 2018, 08:27 PM   #52
Siggy-06
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 2, 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 838
When I'm hiking, I like to go light, especially if it's not an overnight trip. Plus here in FL humidity and sweat is a big factor. So, I carry my Beretta Pico in my front pocket. Stainless slide and 6+1 of .380 jhp, and the sights+trigger are pretty good for a pocket gun. Only have really run into racoons, snakes, and other humans on the trail, never had to use it though. Now if I was in brown bear country, bear spray and my 45 colt go on the hip.
__________________
Flicks just like a lighter, just a different kind of fire.
Siggy-06 is offline  
Old November 23, 2018, 06:30 AM   #53
agtman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2001
Location: midwest
Posts: 2,151
Quote:
What caliber for space aliens?
The 10mm AUTO, of course. None better.
agtman is offline  
Old November 23, 2018, 07:29 PM   #54
Cosmodragoon
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 18, 2013
Location: Northeastern US
Posts: 1,612
Just a thought but I'll question the plinking role of trail guns. Yes, you might see a great spot with something you really want to shoot at for fun, besides an animal destined for campsite cooking. How often does this happen? If it does happen, how much of the limited ammo you are carrying has now been spent on plinking? How much do you have for the rest of your trail time, presumably including the hike out?

Maybe it's just the decades of plinking here but I prefer shooting actual stuff, like bottles and cans. Sure, you might want to aerate some emptied cans the morning after camping out but then you've already planned to haul canned beverages to a campsite and you probably planed to haul extra ammo. The point is, at least for me, that plinking tends to be a planned activity. It involves a change in role from what I consider in a general trail gun.
Cosmodragoon is offline  
Old November 23, 2018, 09:18 PM   #55
Drm50
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 10, 2014
Posts: 759
I think a lot are missing the definition of a trail gun. It's purpose is not SD or to
use in bear attack. Might be different if your trail is a path in a metro area park or area where you might encounter a bear. A trial gun has to be accurate, not
7' gut buster level. When you spend a lot of time in the woods such as you do on
a farm or ranch while doing chores or fishing and any other activity other than hunting, it is what you carry. You may what to shoot a squirrel or a varmit. Hard to tell what you may want to put a hole in. Most carry a 22 or 38sp (357). Most
guys will put up with a little extra weight to gain accuracy. Other than 22s I don't
know of any plastic guns that would fill this roll. The ultimate trail gun would be a S&W Kit gun. I prefer a m17 or m14, bigger and heavier but deadly accurate. Some would go with m15 or m18 with shorter 4" barrel. We don't call them trail guns, we call them Cruzin Pieces and I've herd them called Loafen' Guns. They are for people that are in the boonies a lot of the time, not for occasional hikers
or people worried about SD.
Drm50 is offline  
Old November 24, 2018, 11:15 AM   #56
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 3,970
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmr40 View Post
Interesting reading, but that was 42 years ago. A lot has changed.
yep....and what constitutes a proper trail gun is really defined by the trail one is on. Walking a trail in Central Park is probably gonna dictate a different 'trail" gun than one used to walk on Kodiak Island.
buck460XVR is offline  
Old November 24, 2018, 12:39 PM   #57
ratshooter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 22, 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,409
Quote:
I think a lot are missing the definition of a trail gun. It's purpose is not SD or to
use in bear attack. Might be different if your trail is a path in a metro area park or area where you might encounter a bear. A trial gun has to be accurate, not
7' gut buster level. When you spend a lot of time in the woods such as you do on
a farm or ranch while doing chores or fishing and any other activity other than hunting, it is what you carry. You may what to shoot a squirrel or a varmit. Hard to tell what you may want to put a hole in. Most carry a 22 or 38sp (357). Most
guys will put up with a little extra weight to gain accuracy. Other than 22s I don't
know of any plastic guns that would fill this roll. The ultimate trail gun would be a S&W Kit gun. I prefer a m17 or m14, bigger and heavier but deadly accurate. Some would go with m15 or m18 with shorter 4" barrel. We don't call them trail guns, we call them Cruzin Pieces and I've herd them called Loafen' Guns. They are for people that are in the boonies a lot of the time, not for occasional hikers
or people worried about SD.
DMR50 I agree with you 100%. I started shooting back when that Skeeter article came out. There was no internet so if you wanted to learn about guns you read gun magazines. Thankfully they were far better than they are today. They gave you real information and not just a long winded ad for the gun being reviewed. And they talked about guns for SD but they also talked about the other uses like target shooting and trail walking. They weren't as obsessed with shooting and killing another person like we are today. And it was those early articles that shaped my opinion on what a trail gun was and how it was used.

And I did use my 22 caliber trail gun to get myself out of a really tight spot. No shots were fired but if I hadn't have been armed I might not be writing this today. Even bad guys don't want to be shot even if its just a 22 they are being shot with.
__________________
"Those who cannot cleanly dispatch their game using a .30-30 are either shooting too far, hunting inappropriate (too large) game, or are simply incompetent." Mic McPherson

I can understand your anger at me, but what could you possibly have against the horse I rode in on?
ratshooter is offline  
Old November 24, 2018, 02:47 PM   #58
riverdog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 11, 2000
Posts: 824
Trail gun to me means fairly lightweight, easy to carry as you are doing other things not firearms related. Hmmm, that sounds a lot like my Glock G-19 — pushing a cart in the grocery store with a Glock under my sweater.
riverdog is offline  
Old November 24, 2018, 05:40 PM   #59
Drm50
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 10, 2014
Posts: 759
I have carried a 22 since I was big enough to load one. When I was kid, I had a Route Gun.
A Single-6 22. My paper route took me in and out of village limits. A couple neighborhoods
were so bad with vicious dog problems the PO would not deliver the mail. Paper boys didn't
have that option. After being bitten requiring stitches my old man OKed going armed. I shot
two dogs, after they bit me and had to go to court 3 times for discharging a firearm in village limits. Charges were dismissed. That was the only time I ever actually shot something that was necessary. Never have had to pull a gun on a person in the boonies. I
have shot a lot of snakes and chipmunks that were minding there own business and lots of
rabbits, squirrels and grouse for the pot. Mostly just spur of the moment plinking sessions.
The 22 is not so good as a tool to chop firewood like Skeeters 44spec. was. I did once use
a 1911 to make holes to run 12/2 wire from a generator into a shed.
Drm50 is offline  
Old November 27, 2018, 04:06 PM   #60
mk70ss
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 12, 2008
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 1,052


This one now suits me perfect. Power/size/weight are about perfect.
__________________
Say when.....
mk70ss is offline  
Old November 27, 2018, 05:14 PM   #61
Dano4734
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 6, 2014
Posts: 712
454 casull for me. Bigfoot or space invader I am covered
Dano4734 is offline  
Old November 28, 2018, 10:03 AM   #62
stinkeypete
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 22, 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 281
For plinking, toss a little .22 in my pocket.

When I walk, my biggest worry is misbehaving aggressive dogs some bad citizen may have driven out in to the country and “set free”. .44 magnum is too heavy, but it’s one that makes the fellas jealous and my dad gave it to me. It’s my deer hunting pistol.

I keep looking at .32 H&R or whatever Ruger did, in a handy little revolver. It would take care of plinking and pesky varmints without the horsepower needed for a whitetail. Since I’ve never needed anything my walking stick couldn’t take care of. But then it’s just because I would really prefer a 32-20 but don’t want to fuss that much... wait... 32 special is a lot less fuss and common as can be. If I found a great price on a field gun in .32 or .38.. I just might get one despite my gunsafe downsizing exercises.
stinkeypete is offline  
Old November 28, 2018, 01:41 PM   #63
deserted
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 18, 2015
Posts: 101
Been away for awhile, but had to put my two cents worth in. I've spent most of my 68 years in the mountains of the west, living and working and playing. For forty or so years, I carried a single action .22 revolver, and always felt pretty well armed, as I got really good with it. Along about 2010 I learned of the 327 FM, but wanted it on a .22 frame. So I got a Single Six in .32 H&R with the idea that I'd have it converted some day, and fell in love with the .32s. Gave the old Colt .22 to my son. As soon as I heard about the Single Seven in .327FM, I ordered a 7 1/2" barreled one, then a 4 5/8" (my EDC these days), and finally the 3 1/2" bird's head grip one, for CC in town. I live in the heart of deer and elk winter range, open range for cattle, there are coyotes every where, aggressive badgers, and I hear rumors of bear and lions, but have yet to see any. Even seeing people out here in the northern Great Basin is very rare, but, without exception, they are always armed, too, so I feel better with the S7 and factory Federal 100 grainers that do a flat 1600fps out of the 4 5/8" barrel. Cast bullet hand loads are milder, of course. Haven't shot a .22 in years. The S7 is actually a little lighter than a S6, as the holes are bigger and there's one more of them. Fact is, I rarely shoot anything BUT .327 anymore, except, of course, the 25-45 Sharps. I used to carry the .22 and, during big game season, a Blackhawk in .357 for deer. Now, just the one gun does it all, what with factory and hand loads.
A seven shot six shooter with .357 oomph on a .22 frame...the PERFECT trail gun.
deserted is offline  
Old November 28, 2018, 08:06 PM   #64
ratshooter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 22, 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,409
Deserted glad to see you back. And I liked your earlier post on the 327 round in the Ruger S7. I might be tempted to get one except I have two single sixes in 32 Mag already. I rarely ever shoot full power loads. I am more likely to shoot lead bullet loads around 900Fps or jacketed loads at 1100fps just like the original loads were loaded. Maybe they knew something after all.

But full power 85gr loads get 1300fps and 100gr loads do 1250fps and that’s fine for my uses. But what sweet little guns these are. Really about as good as it gets for a trail walker.
__________________
"Those who cannot cleanly dispatch their game using a .30-30 are either shooting too far, hunting inappropriate (too large) game, or are simply incompetent." Mic McPherson

I can understand your anger at me, but what could you possibly have against the horse I rode in on?
ratshooter is offline  
Old November 28, 2018, 10:38 PM   #65
reteach
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 31, 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 244
In my first reply to this thread I was thinking in terms of backpacking and weight saving. But I agree that for easy walking or riding in my truck, the Single Seven birdshead is a sweet gun to carry. Had mine tucked inside my waistband today as I ran errands around town.
Deserted - any tips on town carry?
reteach is offline  
Old November 30, 2018, 12:41 PM   #66
the possum
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2004
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 537
Thanks again for all the input, fellas. I have a few more ideas to try out now. Just need to get out there and actually do it!
the possum is offline  
Old December 1, 2018, 08:17 PM   #67
ROCK6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2004
Location: Georgia/Afghanistan
Posts: 303
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmr40

Rock6, if you're still following the thread, I've been to several places in your photo's. Springer Mt and Rough Ridge. Killed a bear near that Rough Ridge trail sign many years ago. And that area is FULL of bear. I wouldn't hike there without a gun suitable to stop a black bear.

My choice if black bear are in the area is a G29 loaded with 200 gr hardcast bullets. If no bear a smaller 9mm will do just fine.
We've run into dozen of bears along the AT. As long as you follow basic protocol (don't rub peanut butter on your toes and then climb into your hammock), they're less of a threat than the druggies at some of the shelters. Bi-pedal humanoids are the biggest threat as you get closer to civilization.

Now, the Cohutta National Forest, west of Springer is loaded with black bear. I would likely go with more bear repellant if we go back there. 8 out of 10 backpackers we ran into were open carrying (it was during bear hunting season as well). I'm not saying black bear are harmless, but their threat is extremely low compared to other potential and more likely threats (severe weather, mechanical injury, arthropod attacks, hot/cold weather injuries, etc.

I'll admit, carrying a handgun is more for mental comfort than actual necessity. The challenge becomes weighing your choices (literally) when every ounce counts. Nobody carrying a .44 caliber Ruger Redhawk is likely backpacking 12-15 miles a day for several days. For actual distance backpacking, especially on more established trails are very low-threat. The only areas that are problematic are the shelters (especially in the Smokies), where backpackers leave food and trash and attracts more opportunistic bears...which is why we never sleep near shelters...

Last time we went into Cohutta, I just took along a G23 with the 200gr Hardcast +P. 10mm would be more appropriate in a G29-sized package, but I don't have one in the stables (yet). I've carried my .40S&W Shield as well for a much lighter choice than the double-stack G23; that's about the lightest pistol with the most punch without getting into some of the air-weight .357's.

ROCK6

Last edited by ROCK6; December 1, 2018 at 08:23 PM.
ROCK6 is offline  
Old December 2, 2018, 09:46 AM   #68
buck460XVR
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 28, 2006
Posts: 3,970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drm50 View Post
I think a lot are missing the definition of a trail gun. It's purpose is not SD or to
use in bear attack. When you spend a lot of time in the woods such as you do on
a farm or ranch while doing chores or fishing and any other activity other than hunting, it is what you carry. They are for people that are in the boonies a lot of the time, not for occasional hikers
or people worried about SD.
I too hafta heartily disagree. Take away SD/PD and protection from dangerous game and what do you have left to even justify bothering carrying a handgun outside of it being a primary weapon during hunting season? Shooting holes in the trail signs? Just showin' off your favorite rig? Why not for occasional hikers or folks worried about SD?

While your subjective definition of a Trail Gun works for you, odds are it ain't workin' for everybody. What about S&W's .44 Magnum "Trail Boss" or Ruger's ''Alaskan" models. Both by the manufacturer's descriptions are meant to be "Trail Guns" and are basically designed for bear/two legged predator protection. Besides, I've worked for many years on Farms and Ranches......and am an ardent fisherman. Don't come across trails very much on either.
buck460XVR is offline  
Old December 2, 2018, 10:50 AM   #69
Drm50
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 10, 2014
Posts: 759
I think I pointed out that if you were in country where bear may be a problem or your trail
may be in a urban area with crime problems a 22 wouldn't be a choice. Since most people
are not in bear country that leaves SD against humans. If you want to call your CCW a trail
gun it's ok with me. To understand Trail gun you might go back and read some articles in
gun magazines before the hype on Bear Guns and fixation with shooting people became popular. I'm sure guys in bear country didn't wait until all the companies came out with the
special models of Bear Guns before they armed themselves. Just as the laws allowing CCW
have hyped the public. Both bear gun & SD gun are for a intended purpose and not much
good for anything else.
Drm50 is offline  
Old December 3, 2018, 10:56 AM   #70
the possum
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2004
Location: Southern Illinois
Posts: 537
My farm gun was an SKS. It rode along on the tractor in case I saw a coyote, since it was very rare to see one within 75-100 yards.
the possum is offline  
Old December 23, 2018, 03:51 PM   #71
shooter1911
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 16, 2010
Location: DFW Area
Posts: 245
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJ45 View Post
Skeeter was a Marine and Texas Ranger and maybe some other LEO affiliate.

Keep in mind that Skeeter was writing for a living and those guys either wrote what the editor wanted them to write or had to dig up something new every month.

Some writers seemed to be more objective than others but after a period of naivety I learned to take most of those writings with a large dose of salt, since so much conflicted with my own experience.
Skeeter did a lot of great things, but he was never a Texas Ranger.
shooter1911 is offline  
Old December 25, 2018, 02:58 PM   #72
Mannlicher
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 8, 2001
Location: North Central Florida & Miami
Posts: 3,089
I have survived every thing Florida swamps and palmetto thickets could throw at me for 60+ years now with a .22 S&W 4 inch barrel revolver.
__________________
Nemo Me Impune Lacesset

"The trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant; it's just that they know so much that isn't so.".........Ronald Reagan
Mannlicher is offline  
Old December 25, 2018, 05:25 PM   #73
Red Devil
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2010
Posts: 143
Trail Gun.





Red
Red Devil is offline  
Old December 25, 2018, 09:05 PM   #74
Carmady
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 26, 2013
Location: on the lam
Posts: 1,227
oops
__________________
John Wayne called a revolver a pistol so it's a pistol, pilgrim.

Last edited by Carmady; December 25, 2018 at 11:16 PM.
Carmady is offline  
Old December 29, 2018, 09:56 AM   #75
Brian Williams
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 4, 2001
Location: Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,267
I really like my S&W model 60-4, a nice small J frame with a 3" barrel and adjustable sights. Sweet gun and easy to carry.
__________________
Brian
<><
Brian Williams is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.12210 seconds with 10 queries