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Old May 16, 2019, 11:16 AM   #51
Jack Ryan
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I don't believe you need to "break in" a new gun in a single day. I shoot a bunch. I start with 9mm, 45 acp, or 357 mag after a bit and I can tell I am getting tired I switch to 22's, Cheap and fun. Ruger MKII gives great practice and you don't flinch. WHEN YOU HEAL and are cleared by the Dr, take your 1911 shoot a mag or two and call it good. Pick up the 22 and enjoy.
I don't believe you need to "break in, ie wear out" a new gun at all. It either works out of the box or I send it back unless I bought some kind of kit gun I expect to work on to make it work.
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Old May 16, 2019, 02:16 PM   #52
Fishbed77
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I was only able to make thru 250 rounds at the one hour mark before my wrist and arm started hurting and shaking uncontrollably and flinching.
Everyone will fatigue and injury can occur to anyone, regardless of how strong you are.

For example, I'm a pretty strong guy and lift weights regularly, but I strained my upper back once (it hurt for weeks) just picking up a hamper of dirty laundry.

The body is a complicated machine.
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Old May 16, 2019, 03:35 PM   #53
zeke
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Went through a spell where enjoyed shooting very quickly into suitable sized target. It is not just the size of the cartridge, but the repeated recoil (repetition). After several months was hurting in my shooting wrist.
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Old May 16, 2019, 04:01 PM   #54
polyphemus
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All of which makes one wonder,how many servicemen got Carpal Tunnel Syndrome after that famous 6000 round trial March 1911.
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Old May 16, 2019, 05:04 PM   #55
TunnelRat
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Originally Posted by Fishbed77 View Post
Everyone will fatigue and injury can occur to anyone, regardless of how strong you are.



For example, I'm a pretty strong guy and lift weights regularly, but I strained my upper back once (it hurt for weeks) just picking up a hamper of dirty laundry.



The body is a complicated machine.
I knew a SWAT guy that blew out his back lifting a jug in his basement. He had to crawl up the stairs to his phone and call his wife for help. He was dead set against calling 911and having to live it down with the EMTs.

I've done 20+ courses with firearms, from force on force to moving as a fireteam. I have never been hurt in those courses. In the meantime I've broken my foot falling off a ladder, torn my meniscus tripping on a baby gate, and the list goes on. As you say, injuries happen.

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Old May 16, 2019, 05:29 PM   #56
TxFlyFish
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I know we’ve been trying to establish my age, fitness, lifestyle, work environment etc

and that’s ok and all...BUT I AM NOT A C U P C A K E. Just wanted to set that straight on the internet
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Old May 16, 2019, 05:41 PM   #57
Rangerrich99
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Originally Posted by TxFlyFish View Post
I know we’ve been trying to establish my age, fitness, lifestyle, work environment etc

and that’s ok and all...BUT I AM NOT A C U P C A K E. Just wanted to set that straight on the internet


First things first: get healthy.

I had a similar issue with shaking after a few dozen rounds with (of all things) my then-new Ruger LCP. Thing's heel kept stabbing me right in the palm of my hand, hitting a nerve cluster. Once it was aggravated, the shaking translated to other handguns.

I know your issue began differently, but I think the same cure applies. Stop shooting for awhile and get healthy.

Afterwards, consider changing your grip. Since my episode I changed my grip mechanics, and it's apparently made a world of difference. Now I grip the gun much higher and tighter than before, and have effectively reduced most muzzle flip, which is helping me with wrist/forearm fatigue. I am developing quite the callous on the side of the second knuckle of my strong hand from how tightly I have that finger jammed against the bottom of the trigger guard, but no issues with shaking anymore.

Basically I use the grip advised by Rob Leatham; grip the gun as tightly as you can until you start shaking, then ease off until you stop shaking. That's how tight you need to grip. It worked for me; maybe it'll help you a bit.
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