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Old April 21, 2017, 09:44 AM   #1
Model12Win
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Old vs New GP100

How are the new Ruger GP100s compared to the old ones? This gun has been made since the mid '80s and I am wondering if the factory new ones have changed in any way, possibly for the worse or even for the better. Are the new guns still considered a rugged and durable revolver?

Just looking for some feedback before I buy a 4" stainless model. Seems used prices for these are actually higher than some of the big box prices for a brand new one, so I figured I'd see what opinions were before getting a new one.

Thanks all!
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Old April 21, 2017, 10:33 AM   #2
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One change is that the 4" is now 4.2" in order to have no issues with Canadian law for minimum barrel length...
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Old April 21, 2017, 10:44 AM   #3
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Difficult to give you a solid answer, however I will comment that I was able to find a new inbox three inch GP 100,stainless .357 about three months ago that was made in November 2013, that is PERFECT. I turn 80 this month, and have been searching for the right carry gun for a long time.This one is IT.! I did change out the original Hogue fingergroove grips to the compact Lett style insert grips ordered from Ruger. They conceal better and are more comfortable shooting 158 grain magnum loads.
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Old April 21, 2017, 11:10 AM   #4
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Thanks, all. I have a 6" barrel one made in 2011 and it is a sweet shooter for sure, but I know a lot can happen in 5 years and am wondering if quality has dropped as it has with many companies in the past half decade.

Truth be known, that 6" gun is a dream on the line but I'm looking for a holster gun and the 4" (well 4.2" really) one has been on my list for a while. Just wondering if they're still good to go.
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Old April 21, 2017, 11:16 AM   #5
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Other than the change over to some MIM parts they are pretty much the same.

Jim
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Old April 21, 2017, 12:09 PM   #6
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Barrel length as noted, MIM parts as noted, and a different firing pin retention system.
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Old April 21, 2017, 12:44 PM   #7
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[QUOTE] I turn 80 this month, and have been searching for the right carry gun for a long time.

I'll be 74 on the same day you'll be 80 but my idea of the "perfect" carry gun is a little different than yours. For a long time now, I've been toting either a Colt Cobra or a Smith & Wesson Model 12; both great carry revolvers but not perfect. Perfect for me is the Ruger LCR, chambered in .327 Federal Magnum. I'm still looking for one in my area but, because I'm at the age where I don't buy green bananas anymore, I hope to locate one soon.
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Old April 21, 2017, 01:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
Difficult to give you a solid answer, however I will comment that I was able to find a new inbox three inch GP 100,stainless .357 about three months ago that was made in November 2013, that is PERFECT. I turn 80 this month, and have been searching for the right carry gun for a long time.This one is IT.! I did change out the original Hogue fingergroove grips to the compact Lett style insert grips ordered from Ruger. They conceal better and are more comfortable shooting 158 grain magnum loads.
Congrats JAREDSHS, on both the birthday and the choice. It's never wrong to choose a handy .357 revolver.
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Old April 21, 2017, 01:13 PM   #9
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I did not know the new ones had MIM.

When did this change occur? Is my 2011 vintage affected? I don't think I would want to own a revolver with MIM.
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Old April 21, 2017, 01:13 PM   #10
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I noticed Ruger had adopted MIM to make some of their newer revolver parts a little while ago.

If they're doing it themselves, and bought high quality molds, it ought to be a good thing. They ought to be able to realize more consistency and tighter tolerances on their parts (like hammers) than investment cast/machined.
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Old April 21, 2017, 01:25 PM   #11
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Model 12 & Cooldill,
Ruger started moving MIMs into the steel DA revolvers roughly 5 years ago.

The GP has a MIM trigger & cylinder bolt (cylinder latch in Ruger-ese), and thumbpiece.
Possibly a couple other small parts.

The decision was to NOT do a MIM GP hammer for cosmetic reasons.

Ruger specs out a more advanced MIM formulation for their vendors than the one S&W introduced years ago.
They do not do their own MIMs.

It holds up just fine in their guns.

You can check on your older one by looking at the back of the trigger.
Solid: Cast.
Hollow: MIM.
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Old April 21, 2017, 01:50 PM   #12
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It is hollow.

It appears that even though it is MIM, it has held up. I've fired this gun many times and dry fired it thousands of times to the point of the trigger being super smooth. I have never broken a part.

Perhaps my misgivings of MIM aren't founded...
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Old April 21, 2017, 02:19 PM   #13
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Unfounded here.
If you're dry-firing that much, the transfer bar's more likely to bust than the trigger.

Ruger's MIMs are not fragile.
They're not going to ship guns with parts that'll wear out in a hurry.

And you can pass that along to Cooldill.
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Old April 21, 2017, 04:26 PM   #14
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When it comes to Ruger MIM isnt the problem, It's lack of quality control.
Yes Ruger does have an awesome customer service reputation. But I've grown tired of sending them in. And 3 of the last 5 I've sent in were destroyed and replaced with another model because they can only replace it with whats on the assembly line at that time. Not necessarily What you originally bought and paid for.
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Old April 21, 2017, 05:03 PM   #15
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I sure am glad we have DPris around here and on THR to answer questions with his insider information.

I have no problems with MIM parts. Most would never know the difference without the internet. I wonder how many cast and MIM parts are on my truck engine that is just about to turn over 200,000 trouble free miles?
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Old April 21, 2017, 06:24 PM   #16
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Can't tell you much about comparing old vs new but my 2016 model, 4" stainless steel is just outstanding. First buy you will want to make is a new hiviz front site. Makes a world of difference. The thing absorbs even the stoutest loads. Very satisfied owner.
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Old April 21, 2017, 07:40 PM   #17
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Just switched out my carry rotation and am wearing my Match Champion. I think the half lug carries better than full, when 4-5" barrel. My 3" is cut back to the ejector shroud, so it is a moot point there. That gun is converted to 41 Special. All have Lett style grips from Altamont, with compacts on the 3" gun.

I didn't really pay for a Match Champion, since it was a trade-in for a scrapped Service Six. However, writing off the Six effectively made the MC a $1000 gun.

I have the second generation version with adjustable sights.
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Old April 21, 2017, 08:31 PM   #18
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When I was getting a 3" GP, I was prepared to hate the trigger, since the net is filled with disparaging comments about them. I even read up on trigger jobs.
Surprisingly, the trigger turned out to be easily the equal of my well used S&W Model 15-3.
My GP is a seriously great shooting revolver.
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Old April 22, 2017, 03:14 PM   #19
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Quote:
When I was getting a 3" GP, I was prepared to hate the trigger, since the net is filled with disparaging comments about them. I even read up on trigger jobs.
Surprisingly, the trigger turned out to be easily the equal of my well used S&W Model 15-3.
I've had the same experience with two recent production GP100s (one mine, one a friend's). The double action pulls are smooth and light out of the box, and no stacking anywhere in the pull. Not quite as good as a 1950s Smith, but as good or better as anything I've felt on a recent production S&W.
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Old April 22, 2017, 04:02 PM   #20
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When it comes to Ruger MIM isnt the problem, It's lack of quality control.
Yup. I've worked with guys that worked at Ruger and the management and supervisors for the manufacturing side of things just want numbers, quality be damned.

Not saying that Ruger only produces junk, because they don't, it's just that not every part of every gun gets made with the care and attention to detail you'd get from a high end place like Freedom Arms or S&W Performance Center.
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Old April 22, 2017, 04:08 PM   #21
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I just had my brother ask me how long Ruger has been using MIM hammers in the SP101. Told him I didn't know. He sent me a picture he found of one, but I don't have it handy. I found this online pic (Ruger forums is the source, I think).
http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r...n/100_3667.jpg

I'd have no problem with buying a new Ruger with MIM.

I remember when S&W had first started using MIM, and they were discussing it in armorer classes. I also learned a bit more about when talking to the LE contacts for customer service for parts and repair. They said that S&W owned their own MIM molds, so they could control the quality of the molds. The molds were said to be really expensive at the time. They said the actual MIM work was done by a "MIM house", and they took care to explain that it wasn't an offshore MIM house, but one located in the US.

Dunno know if or how they may have changed in more recent years, as they've been busy buying businesses. I learned they finally decided to buy their own equipment to do their own nitrocarburizing (instead of outsourcing parts for Melonite processing). It will save them money in the long run, give them better control of the process, and is something they can offer to other gun companies (who can call the hardening process by any name they wish for their own product lines).

Hard to keep up with all the rapid changes among gun companies and their vendors. For me, anyway, as I'm much less interested in the behind-the-scenes stuff than I was as a younger man.

Sometimes I'll think to make notes of such trivia during armorer classes or conversations with factory folks, and other times I'll think it's something mildly interesting at the moment, but not make a note of it and forget what it was soon thereafter.
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Old April 22, 2017, 04:09 PM   #22
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I just had my brother ask me how long Ruger has been using MIM hammers in the SP101. Told him I didn't know. He sent me a picture he found of one, but I don't have it handy. I found this online pic online.
http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r...n/100_3667.jpg

I'd have no problem with buying a new Ruger with MIM.

I remember when S&W had first started using MIM, and they were discussing it in armorer classes. I also learned a bit more about when talking to the LE contacts for customer service for parts and repair. They said that S&W owned their own MIM molds, so they could control the quality of the molds. The molds were said to be really expensive at the time. They said the actual MIM work was done by a "MIM house", and they took care to explain that it wasn't an offshore MIM house, but one located in the US.

Dunno know if or how they may have changed in more recent years, as they've been busy buying businesses. I learned they finally decided to buy their own equipment to do their own nitrocarburizing (instead of outsourcing parts for Melonite processing). It will save them money in the long run, give them better control of the process, and is something they can offer to other gun companies (who can call the hardening process by any name they wish for their own product lines).

Hard to keep up with all the rapid changes among gun companies and their vendors. For me, anyway, as I'm much less interested in the behind-the-scenes stuff than I was as a younger man.

Sometimes I'll think to make notes of such trivia during armorer classes or conversations with factory folks, and other times I'll think it's something mildly interesting at the moment, but not make a note of it and forget what it was soon thereafter.
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Old April 22, 2017, 05:27 PM   #23
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Quote:
I don't think I would want to own a revolver with MIM.
Why would you have an issue with MIM in a gun made from castings?
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Old April 23, 2017, 06:49 PM   #24
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Injection molded parts can be as strong as extruded or stamped parts. A lot depends on the metal used and the work performed after the part is molded. This process is much better than a standard casting.
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Old April 23, 2017, 10:04 PM   #25
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Thanks. So it seems the current batch of GPs is not a bad batch of GPs.
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