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Old October 18, 2018, 07:30 AM   #1
rebs
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removing military crimp ?

what method are you guys using to remove the crimp from primer pockets ?
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Old October 18, 2018, 08:07 AM   #2
jcj54
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RCBS

Swaging tool in the press, has worked for me for 40 years.
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Old October 18, 2018, 08:16 AM   #3
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Depends, I have 3 different swage devices and a number of cutting tools to remove them.

The best way I have is station 3 on my 1050’s as it adds no extra work or time to the loading process.
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Old October 18, 2018, 08:28 AM   #4
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I use the Dillon swaging tool.
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Old October 18, 2018, 09:14 AM   #5
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I ream mine, just hit the rim of the primer pocket just enough to get rid of the crimp.

That's all you need, to much and you can ruin the brass.
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Old October 18, 2018, 09:24 AM   #6
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Ive swaged but find I prefer to cut/ream out the crimps with one of these.
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/11...er-cutter-head

I mount it in my drill, clamp it in my vice and start cutting. I can cut the crimps out way faster using this method vs any others Ive tried.
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Old October 18, 2018, 09:27 AM   #7
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Dillon's Super Swage 600. Only way to go unless you're just dealing with a handful of cases.

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Old October 18, 2018, 10:24 AM   #8
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I agree with USSR. I just finished swaging over a 1,000 rounds of Lake City 5.56 brass last night. I got it done in no time at all. I was easily going through 2 pieces of brass a second. Being a little fumble fisted is the only thing slowing me down.

I have heard of folks using a drill press, and I don't see how you could do as quick as with the Dillon 600. It is also clean and does not make a mess. Your hands also don't get mangled up and sore.
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Old October 18, 2018, 11:01 AM   #9
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I used, and still have, somewhere, the RCBS primer pocket swager kit. Then I discovered that the nose of my chamfering tool would fit, and a couple of twists cut out the GI primer pocket crimp just fine.

However, I am not doing 1,000 cases at a time, or anything even close to that these days. The chamfer tool does make my hand cramp, after a while, when that happens, I do something else. If you're looking to do a large batch at once, probably not the best way to go.

If you want the press mounted RCBS kit, you can have mine for a good price + shipping, I haven't used it in ages and likely never will again...
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Old October 18, 2018, 11:26 AM   #10
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Lifelong machinist/mechanic here. The first time I encountered a primer pocket crimp I immediately thought of a countersink. That was over 25 years ago and have done thousands with zero problems; never removed "too much" metal. A 1/2" 60 degree countersink is easy to find in any decent hardware store. Can be done by hand or chucked in a drill (hand drill or drill press). Quick, easy, inexpensive.
https://www.mcmaster.com/countersinks
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Old October 18, 2018, 11:56 AM   #11
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Fixed that by not using milsurp brass. snicker. However, a regular chamfering tool works.
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Old October 18, 2018, 12:24 PM   #12
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right now I am using a lyman primer pocket tool on my case prep center. Guess I'll stay with that
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Old October 18, 2018, 12:52 PM   #13
mgulino
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I'm with mikld...A simple countersink chucked to a drill. It's quick and easy to remove a crimp...just be sure not to remove too much brass.
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Old October 18, 2018, 02:57 PM   #14
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1. Cut away most of the crimp with a countersink or the small blade of my pocket knife.
2. Finish up with a Lyman hand reamer, cutting away the remainder .
3. Complete the job with Lyman Primer Pocket Uniforming Tool.

Notice each step involves cutting the crimp away....the reason is when a swag tool is used the brass has some spring back and usually doesn't do a complete and proper job.
With my method every pocket will be properly sized for new primers .
50 years ago all our 30-06, 45 acp and even 38 special were military surplus , dirt cheap and crimped ....so you learned how to deal with those pesky crimps .
Gary
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Old October 18, 2018, 03:05 PM   #15
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Quote:
right now I am using a lyman primer pocket tool on my case prep center. Guess I'll stay with that
That's what I use but chuck it into my hand drill . At high speed with drill in left hand and case in my right hand I can ream out 500 in about 20 min which averages to about 1 every 2.4 seconds or so .

I have the RCBS press mounted swager . Hate that thing , takes way to long because you have to line up each case perfectly . I will add when using the drill method I do you need to have strong-ish fingers that are conditioned to handle 20min straight of work . I'm in construction and work with my hands every day all day so not an issue but if you're a keyboard tapper all day expect your hand/fingers to fatigue .
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If you have some time IMO this is worth a listen/watch but it takes a few minutes to really get going .
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USg3NR76XpQ&t=3265s or a picture of Mohamed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VwpwP_fIqY
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Old October 18, 2018, 05:49 PM   #16
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Lyman pocket reamer bit chucked into cordless drill. About seven-to-ten seconds I guess per piece. Trick is to let the drill do all the work; trying to run the drill at top speed while trying to jam the brass onto bit just makes the brass really hot and wears out your fingers. If you do it gently/slowly, you can feel the bit "bottom out" and you know you're done with that one and on to the next piece.
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Old October 18, 2018, 06:41 PM   #17
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Chamfer/deburr tool (RCBS).
CH-4D primer pocket swage tool.
Lyman primer pocket reamer (handheld).
Lyman primer pocket reamer (case prep center).

Which comes out depends upon the situation and how much brass I'm processing.
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Old October 18, 2018, 08:33 PM   #18
Kevin Rohrer
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I use either the Dillon crimp remover or an RCBS die thingie. Both work fine.
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Old October 18, 2018, 08:44 PM   #19
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Swage, Swage, Swage !! Simple and fast. No power tools needed or brass chips and shavings. No need to grip the case in your fingers while aligning the cutter to the pocket. Saying this, I load on single stage presses. I size in one press then move the case to the other press and swage with the RCBS primer pocket swaging die set. I also have the RCBS bench mounted swaging tool similar to the Dillion Super Swage which is supposed to be better? Still use the RCBS die in the 2nd press. My RCBS swage die has swaged many thousands of .223 cases and hundreds of 30-06 cases. Depends on your set-up and the steps you take. I do all my loading at the bench and don't want to go to the garage for a step to prevent brass shavings from contaminating my reloading room.
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Old October 18, 2018, 08:57 PM   #20
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Ranger i think you’re math is a bit off . 20min x 60sec divided by 500 pieces = 2.4 sec per piece . The 20 min is how long it takes to do 500 pieces but each piece really only takes about 1.5 seconds and is only in the drill for about 1/2 second but there’s other things taking up time . It’s really fast IMHO , not sure where you get 7 or 8 seconds ?? Your math says an hour+ to do 500 pieces . Like I said my hands have no problem doing it .
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Tolerate- allow the existence, occurrence, or practice of something that one does not necessarily like or agree with , without interference.
If you have some time IMO this is worth a listen/watch but it takes a few minutes to really get going .
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USg3NR76XpQ&t=3265s or a picture of Mohamed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VwpwP_fIqY
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Old October 18, 2018, 09:07 PM   #21
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Harbor Freight 1/2 inch , 60 degree countersink, about $1.79....
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Old October 18, 2018, 09:58 PM   #22
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Quote:
Harbor Freight 1/2 inch , 60 degree countersink, about $1.79...
I bought a 3 piece set plus handle at HFjunk. They forgot to put a cutting edge on the bits. I use a countersink in a cordless drill for any large number. I recently bought a Lyman tool (orange aluminum body that has reamer and chamfer ends and holds other bits inside (not Lyman) primer pocket cutters and pocket cleaner bits. Very convenient when I find one that needs touch up.
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Old October 18, 2018, 10:33 PM   #23
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I just got to thinking about something . For what ever reason I generally never have the brass that has the staked primer crimp . ( the ones with the 3 or 4 distinct cuts/stakes around the edge ) but rather the circled pressed type . The staked type don't do well at all with the drill method because the staked sections tend to grab the reamer and twist out of your/my hand , sometimes quite violently when I don't notice what type of staking it has . Something to consider and thought it could be helpful to know .
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Tolerate- allow the existence, occurrence, or practice of something that one does not necessarily like or agree with , without interference.
If you have some time IMO this is worth a listen/watch but it takes a few minutes to really get going .
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USg3NR76XpQ&t=3265s or a picture of Mohamed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VwpwP_fIqY
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Old October 19, 2018, 06:09 AM   #24
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I tried a Mighty Armory de-capping/swage set up and like it alot. Once you set the die up, deprimes with ease, and then just swap out the depriming pin for the swage pin, install the swaging nub on the ram and slip the cap over the nub, go to town.

No adjustments on the die or set up other than that. No adjustment for different brands of crimped brass needed as I had read several comments about having to adjust the swaging die for different brands of brass. I do have a few that need a bit of attention with a Hornady crimp tool but I wait until I have trouble priming that/those cases.
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Old October 19, 2018, 06:39 AM   #25
thallub
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Quote:
what method are you guys using to remove the crimp from primer pockets ?
A Chamfering tool chucked into a drill press works for me.
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