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Old January 10, 2020, 04:27 PM   #1
kst8fan
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Winchester Model 70

Looking to buy a Winchester Model 70 in 6.5 Creedmoor. I've looked at many reviews and they sound like really well made guns. Do any of you have experience with these Portugal made Winchesters? They have switched back to a controlled feed as opposed to a push feed action like the pre 64’s were made as I take it. Looking at the featherweight model. Hunting would be my primary purpose for the gun, probably punch paper also. Thoughts?
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Old January 10, 2020, 04:43 PM   #2
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The pre-64's were made by machining the receiver from bar stock. The current production M70's are forged. Pretty much everything about the current product rifles is at least as good or better than they ever were -- but what they are not are products of an immense amount of manual-machining, hand-checkering, hand-fitting, and human attention to detail that is best exemplified not just in pre-64's but actually best by pre-WWII Model 70's. If you just want function, the new rifles are as good or better in everyway. If you want a piece of history and a product of a bygone work ethic, they're just not the same.

Since the new M70's do not have this esoteric value, it is only fair to compare them to similar alternatives like Ruger M77's, CZ's, Kimbers, Montana...
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Old January 10, 2020, 04:58 PM   #3
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Get the Featherweight; you'll be happy.
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Old January 10, 2020, 05:16 PM   #4
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I have a Featherweight in .243 that I've owned for a couple years now. Not a bit of trouble, fit and finish are good and it's accurate.

Wouldn't hesitate to buy another model 70.
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Old January 10, 2020, 07:55 PM   #5
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They've been making CRF since 1992. Although they did also continue to make the push feed versions as their budget offerings until 2006. There were no Winchesters in 2007 and only a handful in 2008 after FN started producing them again in South Carolina. Full production was up by about 2010.

The 1992-2006 guns, especially pre-2000 are probably the best model 70's ever made. There were some design changes after 2008, but they are still very good rifles. The biggest change was a completely new trigger. The old style trigger was as rugged and bulletproof as any design ever made, but was harder to adjust to a light trigger pull. It could be done, just harder to do.

The new trigger is much more complex, but is easily adjusted and out of the box is a better feeling trigger. I still trust the old style better for rugged rough country hunts in fowl weather. I have a 2008 rifle and a 1999 version. Both are very good. Some of the early Portugal guns had reports of cosmetic flaws, but as far as I can tell those issues have been corrected. If I needed a new Winchester made in Portugal wouldn't stop me from buying it.
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Old January 11, 2020, 01:52 PM   #6
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Your budget will matter. The Featherweight and SS model weigh the same(6 lbs 12 oz), but the Feather runs about $330 less MSRP.
"...Portugal made..." Only assembled there. Not that it really matters
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Old January 11, 2020, 03:16 PM   #7
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In my view, if I can have only one bolt-action centerfire, it has to be a model 70 Winchester. And if a man can only have one vehicle to drive, it ought to be a pick-up truck.
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Old January 11, 2020, 03:45 PM   #8
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A customer of mine just bought two new Model 70s, both Super Grade, one has presentation French walnut, the other is presentation grade maple. Both are stunning. Both are a lot trimmer than the older Model 70s, and they lood really nice. I liked the old look with the blued extractor instead of the new bead-blasted extractor, but that is a minor thing and easily remedied. If you want a Model 70, get one.
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Old January 11, 2020, 05:39 PM   #9
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Quote:
The pre-64's were made by machining the receiver from bar stock. The current production M70's are forged. Pretty much everything about the current product rifles is at least as good or better than they ever were -- but what they are not are products of an immense amount of manual-machining, hand-checkering, hand-fitting, and human attention to detail that is best exemplified not just in pre-64's but actually best by pre-WWII Model 70's. If you just want function, the new rifles are as good or better in everyway. If you want a piece of history and a product of a bygone work ethic, they're just not the same.
Some years back, I inherited my grandfather's 5-digit (1942) M70 in 30.06. One of the so-called 'pre-War' M70s. The stock showed nicks and scratches, but it still had the factory-installed Lyman receiver aperture sight afixed to the left side. The front of the receiver bridge came factory pre-drill/tapped for a mount and, at some point, Gramps had a 'smith drill and tap the rear bridge.

But the slender factory stock, with steel buttplate, is definitely set up for iron-sighted shooting, a lost skill in an age of Metrosexuals who feel a heavy 10x scope might not yield enough magnification up at deer camp. In fact the iron sights were dead-on at 100yds with just about any 150gn load I tried.

It was actually hard to find a factory '06 hunting load this rifle didn't shoot well. Eventually I got a low-powered 1x-5x Leupy set up in the lowest mounts I could find, and then really started to play with it - factory ammo and handloads.

The big surprise (to me) came when was running a box of Hornady's 'reduced load' 125gn SST ammo through it. I got consistent 5-shot MOA or better groups at 100yds.

This old bolt rifle is hands-down the most accurate .30-06 I've ever shot or owned.

The stuff they're churning out today couldn't hold a candle to it. The CZ CRF 550s - from my experience - are pretty good in the accuracy department, but unfortunately CZ phased those models out in favor of selling the PF crapola.

No school like Old School.

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Old January 12, 2020, 02:10 AM   #10
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Have had a EW/SS in .270 WCF for a coupla years.


Beautiful rifle.

Can find them in the low to mid $900's.




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Old January 14, 2020, 01:19 AM   #11
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Have had a EW/SS in .270 WCF for a coupla years
Winchester quit calling their cartridges WCF back in the late 1930s, so I will assume it is a 270 Winchester instead. After all, that's what it says on the barrel, right?
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Old January 14, 2020, 12:28 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Devil
Have had a EW/SS in .270 
I have the same rifle and I hated the B&C stock, so when the right deal came along on a McMillan Edge FWT stock I snagged it. Couldn't be happier with the rifle now.
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Old January 14, 2020, 12:45 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Scorch View Post
Winchester quit calling their cartridges WCF back in the late 1930s, so I will assume it is a 270 Winchester instead. After all, that's what it says on the barrel, right?
Wow! This is a though crowd. Language police? It would be a real kick in the ego if Winchester stamped the barrel 270 WCF.
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Old January 14, 2020, 01:11 PM   #14
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270 WCF is 270 Winchester. I believe both names are correct, it's just that the original name has fallen into dis-use and obscurity, just like 30 WCF, 44 WCF, etc.
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Old January 14, 2020, 02:14 PM   #15
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I did a search for 270WCF and it came up blank.
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Old January 14, 2020, 06:00 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dufus View Post
I did a search for 270WCF and it came up blank.
Try again:

https://gundigest.com/gear-ammo/relo...270-winchester

Jack O'Connor

Quote:
In the December 1943 issue of Outdoor Life, he wrote, “Assuming that a cartridge can make its way on merit alone, that cartridge is the .270 W.C.F. In its early years it sat in the corner, dressed in sackcloth and covered with ashes, while few riflemen suspected that underneath it had a figger like Miss America, a disposition like an angel, and that it could bake pies like Mother used to make.”
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Old January 14, 2020, 08:01 PM   #17
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As a proud American, I was very happy to recently hear that the great American made Henry rifles recently introduced their Creedmoor model. The craftsmanship of Henry rifles is truly something to be rivaled. I speak as a recent convert and won’t be looking back.






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Old January 14, 2020, 11:11 PM   #18
Pathfinder45
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I'm sure that's a fine, modern levergun; it looks good too; and in 6.5 Creedmoor, no less!
However, that's no model 70 Winchester.....
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Old January 15, 2020, 01:04 PM   #19
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I just found a pre 2005 Winchester classic sporter in .264 mag in like new condition at a local gun store and offered 650.00 out the door and got it.
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Old January 20, 2020, 10:49 PM   #20
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Congrats on the excellent rifle, eastbank.

I'm wonderin' if it is a 264 WCF????
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Old January 20, 2020, 10:57 PM   #21
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Well, fourbore, Tom Turpin wrote the article in 2014, but I didn't see if he is related to the Winchesters. A gun rag writer can get away with almost anything, but the title of the article says 270 Winchester, not 270 WCF. One article writer does not convince anyone but you, so better luck next time. Not to sound or be snarky or to piss anyone off, I have never heard or read anything reputable stating that the official name is anything but 270 Winchester. I guess we should dig thru some more internet searching. And we all know that the internet does not produce false information.

That is a beauty of a gun posted by musicmatty.
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Old January 21, 2020, 09:12 AM   #22
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I,ll have the barrel stamped .264 WCF as I don,t want any future owner getting the wrong shells for it. only a total newbi would have trouble with .270 Winchester-.270WCF ,IMHO.
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Old January 21, 2020, 02:27 PM   #23
kst8fan
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I’ve had a hard time finding a model 70. My local Gunshop says it’ll be march before they’re back in stock. Guess it’s time to check gunbroker.
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Old January 21, 2020, 08:43 PM   #24
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I,ll have the barrel stamped .264 WCF
I hope you're being facetious. That would confuse everybody. There never was a 264 WCF. The 264 Winchester Magnum was introduced in 1963, long after Winchester dropped the WCF designation.
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Old January 21, 2020, 09:45 PM   #25
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YES.
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