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Old July 6, 2019, 10:21 PM   #26
pete2
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I bought a new Python in 1994, it was around 600.00 with wood grips.
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Old July 6, 2019, 10:23 PM   #27
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I was a S&W fan, but you run a Python (at least earlier ones) and it was the difference between a fine Swiss watch and the local tower clock.

Nothing that smooth and slick, don't have one, can't afford one but I do love the feel of one.

Not over hyped.

And no it had nothing to do with Walking Dead whoever or whatever that is.

It was just a finely done pistol at a reasonable price in its day.
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Old July 7, 2019, 01:27 AM   #28
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Won't deny they were finely done. Reasonable price (even back in the day) depends on your point of view, and how fat your wallet was in those days.

I need to do a little digging to get solid numbers on the prices in the old days, will post when I have them.
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Old July 7, 2019, 07:38 AM   #29
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I got mine in the mid-70's, for uniform LE carry. I put Pachmayer Signature grips on it. Carried it till late 80's and retired it for a 686. Sold the original wood grips on eBay, to someone in Japan, for several hundred dollars. Sold the gun around 1990, to pay for new house, remodeling, kids, etc. Probably won't ever have another. I think prices have topped out and yes, The Walking Dead does contribute to current high prices, just like Dirty Harry made Model 29's scarce and expensive for awhile. I loved how it looked (6 inch barrel), accuracy was good but not great, and I still prefer the shorter stroke of a S&W trigger.
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Old July 7, 2019, 07:51 AM   #30
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Quote:
The trigger is over hyped on the Colt
Because the triggers on the Colts were hand fit, the quality of the action varies from gun to gun. I have three Pythons. Two have great triggers, better than any SW I have shot. The third is good, but not as good as some Smiths. And, to top it off, I have a Colt Officers Model Match that absolutely has the best trigger of any revolver I have shot or handled. It has the same trigger system as the Python.
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Old July 7, 2019, 09:06 AM   #31
wild cat mccane
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2010 was when The Walking Dead started.

The Python, carried by the main character, absolutely got a revival in pricing and interest from The Walking Dead.

Anyone with a slight bit of interest can see the prices jumped 2011.

https://www.luckygunner.com/labs/colt-python/
https://www.rockislandauction.com/bl...on-so-popular/

Etc for forever
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Old July 7, 2019, 02:34 PM   #32
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Python's have a great reputation for smoothness and clockwork action. Yet, clocks need servicing and Python 'smiths are in short supply.

If smoothness and accuracy are the primary considerations, definitely check out the Officers Model series. OM Target was pre 1949-ish. OM Special was something like 1949-53. OM Match was about 1953/4 to 1968/9.

All are very nice and capable of shooting better than I am.

If you want smoothness and accuracy, in .357magnum, then keep your eyes open for a Colt Model 3 5 7. Yes- there is a Model 3 5 7, or Three Fifty Seven.

You could call it a predecessor to the Python. Basically, the difference between them is the barrel and finish [both exterior and interior].


I do think that, if comparable work is done to both, the Python and the S&W will be so similar in quality that it will come down to individual preference.

I seem to recall that one can have a lighter SA trigger pull than the other while maintaining reliability. However, the other seems to be capable of a better DA trigger pull.

Personally- get both and be done with the issue. Or, get a Model 3 5 7, save some money, and shoot like a Python without spending $2k.

[and keep a GP100 for a failsafe ]
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Old July 7, 2019, 03:50 PM   #33
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Quote:
If smoothness and accuracy are the primary considerations, definitely check out the Officers Model series. OM Target was pre 1949-ish. OM Special was something like 1949-53. OM Match was about 1953/4 to 1968/9.
My Officers Model Special from 1949 with factory target:




Here's the Officers Model Match that has the best revolver trigger I've personally ever shot:



Quote:
If you want smoothness and accuracy, in .357magnum, then keep your eyes open for a Colt Model 3 5 7. Yes- there is a Model 3 5 7, or Three Fifty Seven.
Mine is from 1954, the first year of production:




And a group photo:


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Old July 7, 2019, 08:40 PM   #34
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Python price check in the 70s:
MSRP

1970
$175

1975
$230

1978
$349.95

For comparison, S&W
M19
1970 / $132
1975 / $160
1978 / $183

M27
1970 / $143
1975 / $190
1978 / $268

M28
1970 / $98
1975 / $135
1978 / $154.50

The old saying was you could buy a S&W, a premium trigger job, take family out to dinner and a show and buy a tank of gas and still have money to put in your pocket for the price of a Python.

So, well made, absolutely. Reasonably priced? Up to you, but I never thought so...
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Old July 7, 2019, 09:06 PM   #35
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I took it to the range today. This is my first 357 I've ever owned or shot. I started out with 38 just to get a feel for the gun. And then I went to 357 Magnum. Holy cow I didn't have any idea what a difference that would make. LOL I thought the gun backfired for a second. All in all it was a good day. I absolutely love the gun. I'm not a rich guy I bought it because I've always wanted one. So I decided not to just keep it in the safe.
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Old July 8, 2019, 09:32 AM   #36
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I have owned 2 Pythons and a .38 Special Trooper. Still have the Trooper and one Python. They are both very smooth in single action, like ball bearings. In double action mode, neither is as good as the worst S&W in the world. Colts can be tuned for double action shooting but from the factory they ain't.
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Old July 8, 2019, 08:23 PM   #37
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I’ll have to disagree with Pete2 on the double action triggers of the 686 and the Python. After I bought the 686 and had it professionally smoothed out, the single action trigger of both guns is excellent and about the same. The DA pulls are indeed different. The 686 is smooth but abrupt, which makes it harder for me to shoot accurately in DA. The Python DA pull is longer, and for lack of better wording, it sort of stacks up, but does so predictably, and I know when it’s going to break. Now, it might be that I’ve shot the Python a bazillion Times and shot the 686 less than 1000 rounds, so I know the Python more so than the 686. But I just can’t seem to tell or feel when the 686 DA is going to break.

Anyway, if I was shooting for money in single action, either gun will do. If it’s DA for money, it will be the Python.
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Old July 8, 2019, 10:18 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natman View Post
....Turning a mint Python into a used Python is foolish.
That is pretty much the way I feel about Pythons these days. If I wanted a shooter, I'd buy a shooter with some wear. But honestly, I mostly shot 38's anyway and had other revolvers for them.

I put pachmayrs on my 1980 Python. I shot it some. But I was not into spending that kind of money (ammo money) just to essentially plink with it. So, it sat a lot and eventually I sold it and bought a couple Colt revolvers I actually collected at the time.

I see you have shot it. I hope you love the revolver. They are many revolver fans' dream 357. As mentioned, the Model Three Fifty Seven is a good one to get and just as good as the Python.

Last edited by 22-rimfire; July 8, 2019 at 10:29 PM.
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Old July 8, 2019, 11:54 PM   #39
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I took it to the range today. This is my first 357 I've ever owned or shot. I started out with 38 just to get a feel for the gun. And then I went to 357 Magnum. Holy cow I didn't have any idea what a difference that would make. LOL I thought the gun backfired for a second. All in all it was a good day. I absolutely love the gun. I'm not a rich guy I bought it because I've always wanted one. So I decided not to just keep it in the safe.
Your money and your choice. I understand it. I cannot fathom buying a gun that I would not be willing to fire. I am NOT a collector- obviously. I am an acquirer, as I do have a few firearms and have/will shoot all of them.

I am a functionalist who likes firearms- and thus wants to use what I spent money on. I do understand the concern about loss of investment due to use, but that is a concern for a different person- and no more 'wrong' for them than my choice is for me.


As to those who talk about the stacking affect on the Colt- they DO stack out of the box. My GP100 has a bit of a 'wall' also that allows me to pre-stage the DA pull to the break.

I had Frank Glenn, of Glenn Custom, do a 'no stack' action job on my Colt and feel it is worth the money- to me. However, there is a Ruger Security Six at my LGS for the same price as the action job, coupled with 2 way shipping.

Keep in mind that this type of job needs to be done with an intent in mind. I told him I wanted it to be as smooth and light as was compatible with ignition of all standard and european .357 primers.

If I were willing to use it for reloaded rounds only, I could have specified so and had it be a bit lighter in DA and SA. Yet, I want it to go BANG no matter what ammo I put in it.

If I ever tune something for reloads, it will be my OMM in .38.


Oh- if anyone has a OMT/OMS/OMM in .22lr, Frank can improve it also, but not as much as a center fire. The rimfire requires a harder 'smack' for ignition, so it can't be made quite as light of a pull as a .38 or .357 can.


That said, the S&W 586 I picked up is almost as smooth and light as the Colt 3 5 7 I have- for about 1/2 the money invested [when factoring in trigger work].

Yet, it isn't a Colt.
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Old July 11, 2019, 01:40 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by jmstr View Post
Your money and your choice. I understand it. I cannot fathom buying a gun that I would not be willing to fire. I am NOT a collector- obviously. I am an acquirer, as I do have a few firearms and have/will shoot all of them.....

Oh- if anyone has a OMT/OMS/OMM in .22lr, Frank can improve it also, but not as much as a center fire. The rimfire requires a harder 'smack' for ignition, so it can't be made quite as light of a pull as a .38 or .357 can.


That said, the S&W 586 I picked up is almost as smooth and light as the Colt 3 5 7 I have- for about 1/2 the money invested [when factoring in trigger work].

Yet, it isn't a Colt.
The 586 has always interested me. Years ago I was at Bass Pro in Macon GA and they were selling a 5". It really appealed to me. But due to the hassle involved in shipping to a TN FFL, I passed. Still wish that I might not have passed on that one.

I have no problem buying revolvers simply to collect and never shoot. Have too many for it to really bother me one way or the other relative to shooting all of them. Just no point. I had a OMM 22 (as-new) and sold it last year. Have a couple OMT's still. Never found a OMS that I liked for money I was willing to pay.

I was always a Colt guy, but have since mostly switched to S&W stuff for shooting. Have a couple Smiths that I haven't shot.
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