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Old December 15, 2017, 03:04 PM   #26
Slopemeno
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WD-40 is Stoddard Solvent.
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Old December 15, 2017, 05:02 PM   #27
FITASC
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No, it isn't

Quote:
What's Stoddard Solvent?

Myth: WD-40® contains Stoddard Solvent.

Fact: Over the past few decades, the name Stoddard Solvent was synonymous with all mineral spirits. Today, the mineral spirits found in products like ours are more refined and processed (see hydrogenation, hydrotreating and distillation techniques) providing mixtures with varying boiling points, cleaning ability, and chemical composition.

The catchall phrase “Stoddard Solvent” is no longer adequate to tell the proper story. WD-40® does indeed have 50% mineral spirits, but they are refined and purified for specific characteristics needed to meet today’s performance, regulatory and safety requirements.
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Old December 15, 2017, 05:40 PM   #28
Hawg
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Quote:
WD40 is fine for wiping down external metal gun surfaces.Don't use it in the action, it turns to varnish in time. hdbiker
No it doesn't. Agreed it is a water displacer but it's not made from fish oil nor does it turn to varnish or get gummy.
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Old December 15, 2017, 10:54 PM   #29
Slopemeno
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WD-40's main ingredients, according to its U.S. Material Safety Data Sheet* information, are:

· 51% Stoddard solvent (i.e., mineral spirits: primarily hexane, somewhat similar to kerosene)
· 25% Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant; carbon dioxide is now used instead to reduce WD-40's considerable flammability)
· 15+% Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)
· 10-% Inert ingredients
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Old December 16, 2017, 01:35 AM   #30
lefteye
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RIG on a small piece of sheep skin with about 1/2 inch of fur stored in an old plastic bullet box (not plastic bullets - just the box ). I've hunted in horrible conditions for many years (I'm 71) and have NEVER had rust on any of my firearms.
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Old December 16, 2017, 08:56 PM   #31
reynolds357
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Wd40, Kroil, Clp, Break Free, Tri Flow, Rem oil, or pretty much whatever else I grab out of my cabinet. I clean it out of the bore before firing anyway.
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Old December 16, 2017, 09:08 PM   #32
Eazyeach
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Please stop arguing about what wd40 is or isn't. It's ran its course.
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Old December 17, 2017, 01:07 AM   #33
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EZ,you are right. But this is setting straight some misinformation.
I did some research.
One of the first uses for WD-40 was 1958,it was used to prevent corrosion in Atlas Missiles.
Quote:
15+% Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)
Slopemo,I assume what is in parenthesis is your own supplemental comment.
The drug store mineral oil would be alight oil,but 140 weight gear oil is also "mineral oil"
The writeup I found actually said "hydrogenated heavy mineral oil"

That "hydrogenated" thing is what they do to vegetable oil to make Crisco.
It makes oil grease-like.
And,yes,it is suspended in a volatile petroleum distillate.This article explained the trade name of the solvent used was Varsol.

Interesting side note: The owner/operator manual for my 1941 vintage South Bend Heavy 10 lathe suggested a formula to slush the machine with for rust prevention during shipping or storage.
It was petroleum jelly (Vaseline) dissolved in Naptha.I don't know,is Vaseline hydrogenated mineral oil?

Naptha is in the general class of petroleum distillates like mineral spirits and Stoddard Solvent.

The used to use it to dry clean clothes. Dry cleaning businesses used to burn down a lot. Naptha is pretty much Coleman fuel.

I would guess Vaseline (or RIG) could be put in a petroleum distillate of your choice just to facilitate application.
But beware flammability.
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Old December 17, 2017, 08:15 AM   #34
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Do what lefteye has said! Works great!!
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