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Old January 10, 2019, 04:03 PM   #1
K13
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Bulged barrel (non reload)

I’ll try to keep this short and sweet. I’ve been shooting a lot in the last 6 months (21,000 rounds) and yesterday I had a squib that I did not hear/detect so I immediate action drilled into a subsequent shot resulting in a barrel bulge. Luckily it did not explode. Now the question is what barrel do I get as a replacement?

Info:

Glock 34 Gen 4
This is my carry firearm with surefire X300u in a sidecar TREX ARMS AIWB holster.

I intend to continue using this as a CCW pistol and practice primarily with 115gr S&B, Whinchester and Remington ammo. Prices usually 169.99-189.99 for 1k. Reason for ammo selection is price.

Finally the price for an OEM and a KKM are roughly 10 dollars difference. 165 to 175 excluding tax.

Anyone CCW a KKM or know how it would work with ammo listed above. Reliability is primarily what I want.

Last edited by K13; January 12, 2019 at 09:57 AM. Reason: Reload clarification
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Old January 10, 2019, 04:15 PM   #2
Dan-O
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I’d buy a $99 barrel off ebay and call it a day.
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Old January 10, 2019, 04:27 PM   #3
K13
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Interesting find. Are match grade barrel tolerances as reliable as OEM?
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Old January 10, 2019, 04:44 PM   #4
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I had a KKM barrel for a Glock 19 Gen 3. This was a drop in version. It fit tighter than the factory barrel it replaced. I put a few thousand rounds through it and never had any issues. It wore evenly and always functioned well. I wouldn't have any qualms about getting another.

Kudos to you for carrying a 34 appendix.

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Old January 10, 2019, 05:18 PM   #5
Fishbed77
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Kudos to you for carrying a 34 appendix.
Indeed. My feet and back would eventually hurt pretty bad from never sitting down.
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Old January 10, 2019, 05:22 PM   #6
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I actually have a T Rex Arms Sidecar. It's pretty nice and I guess as comfortable as an AIWB holster can be. There are times where I think it's great. But even at 165 lb. and 5'9" I'd need to lose a good 10 lb. off my midsection to really feel comfortable with it, and that was with a Glock 19. With a Glock 34? Man, idk.
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Old January 10, 2019, 05:47 PM   #7
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I think having a Kore Essentials belt and wearing a pant size up helps me. The belt is essentially a hoola hoop due to its rigidity. I think my 34 is more comfortable then my 19. Whether it’s because of the slide leangth or the flashlight requiring more kydex/ greater surface area to rest the gun, idk. But I converted over to the 34 as my CCW. The Ratchet style belt allows me to quickly adjust from a sitting position (more slack) to standing (tighter). It’s just a great belt. We expand and contract throughout the day based on what we eat or drink. I’ve gone snow shoeing with the same set up after craming into a car and sitting for 4 hours. I’m surprised myself really. But 1911 guys do it all the time so maybe it’s not to uncommon.
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Old January 11, 2019, 05:47 PM   #8
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K13, welcome to The Firing Line. Interesting first post and I am glad that was all the damage from the squib.

Storm Lake makes good aftermarket barrels. I use one to change a .40 S&W pistol into a .357 Sig pistol, or back whenever the feeling comes over me.

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Old January 11, 2019, 06:35 PM   #9
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I had a squib once but lucky for me it was short enough down the barrel that I caught it before forcing a cartridge. Ever since that day I almost never rapid fire a semi-auto without being reasonably certain of a bullet impact for each shot. Even when I get a successful shot off--sometimes the report may sound a little off and I will automatically stop what I'm doing strip the gun and check the bore. Done it dozens of times with no issues--maybe overly paranoid.
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Old January 11, 2019, 08:11 PM   #10
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I was certain I would be able to detect a squib and was let down when I was unable to. If I’m not shooting my full size silhouette ar500 outdoors where the ring of steel is a certain indicator of a hit I’m indoors shooting at a 8.5x17 inch paper with 8” diameter sticker targets that I replace every 3-4 mags. I was outside in the PNW rain the previous session shooting steel. My ammo was stored loosely in an ammo can and LIKLEY had some moisture penatrate the round. The next day I was at an indoor range and only shooting at 21 feet. After a few mags I get into a consistant 1.5-2 inch grouping and after the center gets shot out it’s hard to determine a hit. I.e the constant reapplication of a sticker target. When the shot broke after the squib it was like buckshot and their were several tubling led tears. Only then was it apparent . I was able to get an OEM barrel yesterday. I have a KKM in route and will determine after some use which to keep. My advice to anyone (self included) is to prepare for the day you don’t catch it. I plan on adding my first aid supplies to my range bag. A practice I have not done prior to this instance. There seems to be a level of continuous practice that brings about complacency which I have fallen victim to.
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Old January 11, 2019, 08:22 PM   #11
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Avoid certain brands of "commercially reloaded" ammo.

My newish Sig 232 had a .380 squib bullet stuck in the chamber, but luckily prevented the next round chambering.

I'm fairly sure that the company, which is definitely near Memphis, sells its reloaded ammo in the Orange Boxes (TN *** ?. They sell them at the Germantown gun shows, and probably many other locations.

Last edited by Ignition Override; January 11, 2019 at 08:47 PM.
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Old January 12, 2019, 01:09 AM   #12
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I have never had a squid, yet. But just wondering, with a squid in a semi auto, does the pistol cycle to chamber another round? I loaded light loads. Some of them simply were too light to cycle the action. None of them were squid.

-TL

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Old January 12, 2019, 01:54 AM   #13
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I have never had a squid, yet. But just wondering, with a squid in a semi auto, does the pistol cycle to chamber another round? I loaded light loads. Some of them simply were too light to cycle the action. None of them were squid.
Assuming you're not angling to get reported to PITA for abuse of animals--If your bullet fails to clear your bore, but your next cartridge can successfully chamber and fire--you're toast. If your bullet barely exited the case so that he next cartridge doesn't chamber all the way--and you happen to suspect a misfire/malfunction of some sort and strip the gun and inspect--count your lucky stars. I've paid much closer attention to where bullets impact and how the report sounds ever since the day I had my squib experience--which I was just stupid lucky I decided to strip and inspect rather than try to clear and forcibly rack.
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Old January 12, 2019, 01:56 AM   #14
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Mine did not cycle. I was at an indoor range and the shooting that was happening around me made it so I heard nothing. When I pressed the trigger it just clicked as if there was a light primer strike, however enough powder had lit to push the round just far enough down the barrel to allow another round to fully chamber. I charged the slide and fired again. Luckily the barrel held up to the circumstances. I’ve seen photos of barrels explode in higher calibers. The chances of having a squib are very rare. You need enough powder to nudge the bullet into the barrel and no more. Hickock45 has a video about it and he explains it very well. He notes that he has had problems getting a squib to occur intentionally for “example” sake.
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Old January 12, 2019, 02:09 AM   #15
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Mine did not cycle. I was at an indoor range and the shooting that was happening around me made it so I heard nothing. When I pressed the trigger it just clicked as if there was a light primer strike, however enough powder had lit to push the round just far enough down the barrel to allow another round to fully chamber. I charged the slide and fired again. Luckily the barrel held up to the circumstances. I’ve seen photos of barrels explode in higher calibers. The chances of having a squib are very rare. You need enough powder to nudge the bullet into the barrel and no more. Hickock45 has a video about it and he explains it very well. He notes that he has had problems getting a squib to occur intentionally for “example” sake.
The odds go up if you reload your own ammo--you can possibly have an inadequate charge, an improperly seated bullet or a bad primer. Having said all that , I have had a few misfires with commercial ammo, and while none of them resulted in a squib--I would never assume it's impossible. Bottom line for me--once I had one; if I feel something is "squirrely" with a shot I now will stop shooting and strip/inspect (the gun). Maybe impractical in a gunfight or competition--but it's a small temporary inconvenience compared to the potentially catastrophic alternative--however small that possibility might be.
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Old January 12, 2019, 03:11 AM   #16
tangolima
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Ok, squib, not squid. Silly me.

If the bullet doesn't exit the muzzle, the action shouldn't be able to cycle to extract / eject the spent brass and re-chamber a new round. The shooter must manually work the slide before he can fire another bullet on to the stuck bullet. Plus the absence of recoil, a squib must be a very noticeable event in a semi auto.

-TL



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Old January 12, 2019, 04:00 AM   #17
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If the bullet doesn't exit the muzzle, the action shouldn't be able to cycle to extract / eject the spent brass and re-chamber a new round.
I suspect you are correct and indeed the OP said the gun did NOT cycle.

I suppose if you're heavily into running scenarios and your gun doesn't fire you just might practice doing the "tactical" thing and rack the slide and get off another shot. I don't know. I personally don't practice that hard.

I have had a squib with a revolver (my hand loads and my fault) and it was OBVIOUS something had gone wrong. Instead of a 'bang' I got more of a 'thump' and I was surrounded by a cloud of smoke. Okay maybe a SMALL cloud but definitely more smoke around me than normal. It was, what you might call a "learning experience" if you're of a charitable mindset or a "gall darn idiot reloader who doesn't know what they're doing stupid mistake" if you're more into calling things what they really are.

To the OP: glad this was a relatively minor problem. Good luck.

P.S. The squid for squib typo and the subsequent comment brightened my day a lot so thank you for that.
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Old January 12, 2019, 07:36 AM   #18
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Quote:
If the bullet doesn't exit the muzzle, the action shouldn't be able to cycle to extract / eject the spent brass and re-chamber a new round.
One of my sons, engaged in a double tap drill, had a squib in a Series 70 Colt 1911 .45 that cycled the action.

The bullet, a 200 gr LSWC had lodged 2+" down the bore and had enough umph to cycle. The 2nd round, fully charged, bulged the barrel and it took a gunsmith to disassemble the gun. We fitted a new Wilson bbl. and bushing and the gun was at least as accurate after the incident as before.

The loads, BTW, were my reloads...put up on a Dillon 550B and were entirely my responsibility. Lack of attention to detail, & no distractions while reloading. A failure to eye the powder level on each round led to my little bit of negligence. I've reloaded my own ammunition for right at 60 years now and I know the rules...we were lucky on that one, and might not be on the next. Diligence, fellow reloaders, Diligence.

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Old January 12, 2019, 08:51 AM   #19
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Over the years, Ive had a couple of squibs in my autos. All but one failed to cycle the slide. On the one that did cycle the slide, the bullet cleared the barrel, but never hit the target at 10 yards. All "felt" and sounded wrong.

I seem to have them more in my revolvers for some reason, which in a case like this, is even worse if youre not paying attention and shooting fast. At least the autos dont usually cycle.

The last one I had in an auto, was with the Glock 17 I practice with, and it wasnt totally unexpected.

After a discussion on another board about water affecting ammo, I put a half dozen of my reloads in a glass of water and let them sit a few days. Loaded the mag and took the 17 out in the yard and started shooting. Had a couple of "off" rounds, but they fired and cycled the gun, but you could tell something wasnt right. The last round went "fffpth" and the gun didnt cycle. This is what I got.....



The others Ive had, were in my old Commander, and they really werent unexpected either. I was using a Lee progressive press back then, and their powder measures can be a bit sketchy at times, and thats what happened, and I was paying attention and caught it, and limited things to about half of a specific box Id loaded. I was half expecting, and looking for trouble with those rounds. Thats the downside to progressives, a lot going on with less checks in the mix.


Normally when Im practicing, if I have a malfunction and the round that caused it felt the least bit off when fired, I still do the clearance drill, get the gun back on target, and then go "bang" in my head, but dont shoot. I stop and clear the gun and check it.

Other than that round in the barrel above, I havent had a squib in my Glock(s) that left a bullet in the barrel. I load my brass to failure and depending on the lot at the moment, I can have a zero, to a few, to a lot of stoppages, malfunctions while Im shooting. Usually, its extraction related. Its actually great for "unexpected" malfunction practice, as you never know when its going to happen, and you get to do it regularly, so you get to the point, you really don't even notice.

Every once in a rare while, Ill get a round that sounds and/or feels a little off, and with anything like that, the gun gets checked before the next round is fired.
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Old January 12, 2019, 09:30 AM   #20
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I know squibs are rare, altho I know a guy who recently had one. BUT this thread has convinced me that 'factory' reloads are probably not the best idea, particularly when new 'factory' ammo is so cheap right now..
Federal brass or winchester white box-$7.87 for 50 9mm FMJ at walleyworld.
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Old January 12, 2019, 09:56 AM   #21
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Thanks for the insight everyone. I to have read/seen videos/heard stories that show/illustrate an indication of something aloof while shooting where the squib was detected. Usually (like the picture above) the powder pushes the bullet down the barrel further then my occurrence which was just enough to have another round fit in the chamber. I suspect that there is going to be more activated powder to push a load to the edge of the barrel. I can see how the “Pffft” sound could be made and therefore a suspicion of a issue arise. In situations where there is no powder and only a primer charge present could that be heard as easily? I DO NOT reload at all. I may have failed to mention. If you train to draw and fire and clear malfunctions as you should if your a CCW “my bottom line” which I believe is the only may to increase your ability to preform in a situation where your life is at stake. You are at greater risk to this mishap. I only practice that way with my CCW pistol. No need to do so with my duck hunting 12g or “range guns”. To the individual that said they don’t train that hard my suggestion is you should and that it’s not at all hard. The hardest thing for me would be having a mindset that carrying a firearm with casual controlled environment practice is all I need or have to rely on. (Not intended to ruffle feathers). Now I’m not out there rolling in the mud and being tactical. I’m simply trying to increase my ability to draw/fire/clear malfunctions. I dress for the weather, sometimes I wear sandals while I shoot outdoors and at the range. I’ve been asked why am I wearing sandals. My answer is because this is something I’d be wearing during an encounter. Plus you need to know how you would react to hot brass being lodged between your toes lol.
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Old January 12, 2019, 10:03 AM   #22
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I may have failed to mention. If you train to draw and fire and clear malfunctions as you should if your a CCW “my bottom line” which I believe is the only may to increase your ability to preform in a situation where your life is at stake. You are at greater risk to this mishap.
bingo!
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Old January 12, 2019, 10:29 AM   #23
K13
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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=P1MHKRBPPAY

Here is an example. He slows the video down afterwards to emphasize the pfffft but it is almost impossible to catch the first time you watch full speed.
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Old January 12, 2019, 12:49 PM   #24
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"...Luckily it did not explode..." That'd rarely happen. Isn't an explosion anyway.
Usually happens with incorrectly loaded ammo. Like not putting powder in and not checking before seating bullets(it was a cast .45 for me, long ago.). It's really annoying and costly to fix, but not particularly dangerous. Assuming the pistol is safe to shoot in the first place.
Gunparts(E-Bay funds the people who want to take your firearms away from you) lists BNIB factory barrels at $225.45. It'll need fitting by a smithy too.
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Old January 12, 2019, 01:08 PM   #25
K13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. O'Heir View Post
"...Luckily it did not explode..." That'd rarely happen. Isn't an explosion anyway.
Usually happens with incorrectly loaded ammo. Like not putting powder in and not checking before seating bullets(it was a cast .45 for me, long ago.). It's really annoying and costly to fix, but not particularly dangerous. Assuming the pistol is safe to shoot in the first place.
Gunparts(E-Bay funds the people who want to take your firearms away from you) lists BNIB factory barrels at $225.45. It'll need fitting by a smithy too.
What isn’t an explosion?
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