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Old November 25, 2021, 05:58 PM   #1
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Model 70 300 H&H any thoughts?

My brother got involved in an estate sale and has offered me a pre 64 model 70 winchester in 300 H&H. The metal is good but the stock will need refinishing. I can have this gun for under $700. Is this a good deal and what about the cartridge. Cartridges are ridiculously expensive but I do my own reloading.
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Old November 25, 2021, 06:11 PM   #2
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In that cartridge, $700 is probably hard to go wrong. Depending on WHEN prior to 1964 matters. The ones made prior to WW-2 are more valuable than the ones after the war. And even those made after the war in less common cartridges and/or configurations will be worth more, and 300 H&H qualifies.

A common 270 or 30-06 made after the war is probably a $600-$700 rifle. I'd think true value on one in 300 H&H would be more. How much is hard to say.

The 300 H&H won't quite match 300 WM speeds, but is close enough. Those are some really LONG cartridges and in order to fit, the loading/ejection ports on those rifles are longer. Meaning scope bases are farther apart and some shorter scopes may not fit without special mounts.

I'd proceed carefully before re-finishing the stock. It might be best to just leave it as is.
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Old November 25, 2021, 06:16 PM   #3
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Thank you for your insights. I already own a pre 64 in .270 and .264 magnum. I absolutely love the controlled round feed and slick bolt action. I'm probably going to get this 300 H&H as soon as I can round up the cash. It probably is a late 50's model with original weaver k4 scope. I shot a nice buck with my 1951 .270 this year. I feel Jack O;conner would be proud of that old gun!
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Old November 25, 2021, 08:05 PM   #4
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That is a good deal! Take it, and if you have second thoughts, PM me. I'll take it off your hands for a few hundred more. (And it would still be a good deal.)
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Old November 25, 2021, 09:31 PM   #5
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H&H is an elegant classic and the parent of many other big cartridges, I recently made most of my 7mm STW cases from the relatively available 375 H&H. Assuming the action and bore are in good shape--I'd jump on it.
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Old November 25, 2021, 10:26 PM   #6
Jim Watson
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It was Winchester who magnumized what was once known as the .30 Super, no more powerful than a good stout .30-06.

In 1939 Winchester was getting a 180 gr bullet to 3040 fps in the Magnum, but the English were still loading it as the .30 Super at only 2700 fps.

So you don't have to load it heavy and beat yourself up.
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Old November 26, 2021, 01:33 AM   #7
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From a collector's point of view, any refinish reduces the value.

While I think today's prices are barking stupid, the .300 H&H has never been any kind of "bargain" round. IT was the biggest .30 caliber stick in the woods for many years and while its performance has been surpassed by newer rounds many of those rounds were based on the H&H magnum case, either the .300 or the .375.

To be clear, you're looking at the basic hunting rifle Model 70, not a match gun, right?

A $700 price in today's dollars doesn't seem bad for that gun, unless its trashed in some way.

As to refinishing the wood, how bad is it, really? Honest wear that would just look nicer refinished? Heavily worn or damaged finish?

sometimes just a good oiling goes a long way to restoring an old stock's looks.
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Old November 26, 2021, 04:49 AM   #8
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My philosophy about old guns is--you either are going to shoot them or put them in a display case on the showroom floor. If you're going to shoot them--then I wouldn't care about the stock (other than it fits properly to give the necessary support to the action). If the stock is really that important to preserve its value--I'd just take it off and get a new one and bed into the action and keep the old one in storage.
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Old November 26, 2021, 11:35 AM   #9
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seconds on the 300 H&H if you don,t want it, to me its a smoking deal at 700 dollars.
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Old November 27, 2021, 05:23 PM   #10
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Great deal, take it. What you plan on doing with it when you get it is COMPLETELY your decision. They are shooting machines to me, so I would refinish the stock or replace it. Maybe just replace it and keep the factory one sealed away or stored somewhere.

I have a new manufacture "Classic" in 300 WSM, which is not nearly the same thing, but it is a big magnum cartridge in a sporter rifle. Just a dream, and I would not hesitate to pick that thing up.
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Old November 29, 2021, 08:57 AM   #11
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Yes, I have decided to refinish the stock. An expert gunsmith did such a great job on my beat up .270 that I am going to get him to refinish the 300 H&H in a very conservative finish with checkering restored. If I ruin some mythical collector value, so be it. I am going to hunt with the old H&H. Nothing would make me happier than to harvest a whitetail with the old H&H!
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Old November 29, 2021, 12:31 PM   #12
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Fine choice, though the .300 H&H is a pretty big stick for whitetails, it will certainly get the job done.

If you're after the meat, bullet selection is important, on light game like whitetails, with a .300 magnum, you don't want a bullet that will blow up at close range and ruin a bunch of meat. I don't think you can go wrong with a 180, but look at any lighter bullets carefully to get the right level of performance.

Any refinish detracts from what the collector who want an entirely original gun will pay, but really, so what?? If you're buying the gun to have and to use and not to sell to a collector, it doesn't matter, or at least, doesn't matter to me.
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