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Old April 23, 2019, 12:58 PM   #51
Marco Califo
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Unclenick made a joke!?! Cool!
MoArk Willy, read my post #36. It is all about you.
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Old April 23, 2019, 01:15 PM   #52
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Don't get wet nitrogen. You can buy nitrogen pumped with water-lubricated pumps mainly for food-related purposes (the fine bubbles in Guinness stout are due to them being part nitrogen). You want to be sure to get oil-pumped nitrogen for protecting cases or anything else. It works because it dissolves oxygen well enough to keep it from reacting with other things.
I used to use what was called "dry nitrogen" purchased from refrigeration supply houses for line purging. It was less than a dollar a cu ft to exchange bottles. A 20 cu ft bottle would go a long way. You would need to own the bottle and regulator first though so that would be a couple of hundred dollars up front.

If you really want ot go completely bozo get a vacuum pump and take the container down to 500 microns or less of moisture then fill it will dry nitrogen and you could bury it in a time capsule and 1000 years from now it would still shine.

My 5.56 and pistol brass collections are happily tarnishing away stored in gallon freezer bags stored in large plastic bins. If I want them shiny when I shoot I can give them a quick trip in a dry media tumbler for a half a hour before loading
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Old April 23, 2019, 02:41 PM   #53
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I used to use what was called "dry nitrogen" purchased from refrigeration supply houses for line purging. It was less than a dollar a cu ft to exchange bottles. A 20 cu ft bottle would go a long way. You would need to own the bottle and regulator first though so that would be a couple of hundred dollars up front.

If you really want ot go completely bozo get a vacuum pump and take the container down to 500 microns or less of moisture then fill it will dry nitrogen and you could bury it in a time capsule and 1000 years from now it would still shine.

My 5.56 and pistol brass collections are happily tarnishing away stored in gallon freezer bags stored in large plastic bins. If I want them shiny when I shoot I can give them a quick trip in a dry media tumbler for a half a hour before loading
I am wondering how that got to the point it worked or when. I have suggested using all methods for dry storage, they only one you left out was the heating of an ammo can. Heat the can, the air expands, at that point the reloaders fill the can with cases. After filling the hot can with cases close the lid, that would be for someone that does not have the fittings and a vacuum pump.
And then there are the Mormons, they are creative.

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Old April 24, 2019, 01:07 PM   #54
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once again on the idea of eliminating air and moisture to prevent tarnishing has anyone here tried a simple vacuum sealer meant for food items? I doubt one would pull more than a few of inches of vacuum but toss in a cloth bag of rice or some other desiccant and it might retard the tarnish somewhat.

$50 at wally world https://www.walmart.com/ip/FoodSaver...39a1633f72d57e
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Old April 24, 2019, 01:31 PM   #55
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"...vacuum seal..." No air. No oxidization.
However, brass does not need to be shiney. It needs to be clean.
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Old April 24, 2019, 02:04 PM   #56
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Of course, in post one I DID NOT ASK does it need to be shiny?
I WANT it shiny, and don't WANT your personal opinions about is shiny necessary?
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Old April 24, 2019, 02:07 PM   #57
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do most folks use FART to wet tumble or is it a good choice for dry media tumble?
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Old April 24, 2019, 02:47 PM   #58
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Wet only with stainless steel pins. I also havea couple of dry tumblers, and still use for the BLING FACTOR. A big factor to me was the ability to decontaminate used brass and pour the blackwater down the toilet. Dry tumbling alone leaves the area contaminated with lead from primers and other nasty things that get airborne.

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Old April 24, 2019, 03:21 PM   #59
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A big factor to me was the ability to decontaminate used brass and pour the blackwater down the toilet. Dry tumbling alone leaves the area contaminated with lead from primers and other nasty things that get airborne.
That is/was my primary reason for switching to wet tumbling . Once I started using my FART I threw out all my old dry media and cleaned the dry tumbler then added new media . Once the brass has been cleaned that well in a wet tumbler putting them through a second dry tumble does not contaminate the area as it once did . Just make sure only brass that's been cleaned in the wet tumbler first goes in the dry tumbler with polish .

I may have left that point out of my first post .
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Old April 24, 2019, 05:48 PM   #60
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I have a friend in California that sends me 9mm brass that he cleaned with SS pins. His brass is always top notch and clean as a pin.

He uses Armor All Wash and Wax and the wax that is on the brass seems to keep the air off because his brass doesn't seem to tarnish much.

When I get them I sort them and bag them in plastic bags that I seal shut with a Seal A Meal.
Each one has 800 to 1k of 9mm cases in them.

For some reason I can't upload my Pic.

I have about 10 bags of these now.
They are clean and shiny and should stay that way for a gosh darn long time.

The primer pockets are clean and he washes them for about 1.5 to 2 hrs.

Last edited by LE-28; April 24, 2019 at 06:03 PM.
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Old April 24, 2019, 10:01 PM   #61
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vacuum sealing would certainly help I would think but there has to be some sort of wax or chemical coating out there just judging by the brass I see for sale in bulk ziplock bags at gun shows. That stuff looks fresh from the tumbler, but then it just might be.
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Old April 24, 2019, 10:30 PM   #62
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Yes, I bought a vacuum sealer for this project. I also ordered silica packets that change color when wet. And NuFinish to run in corn cob media. Thanks to all those who have posted constructive insights.
I really do think ammunition manufacturers do polish and wax their product. I just wish I knew exactly how.
One last bit on Reverse Osmosis Water: It cannot be beat for final rinsing. I use it in the first wash too.
And about my FART: I ran for an hour and all was good. Ran it an hour and half longer and I had the chamber full of densely packed Grey bubble foam taking up all available space. I had not seen that before, nor again since I flushed the mess. Actually, I have spare well used buckets handy to fill one with run-off poured off the brass

And to the Shininess Nay-Sayers of the Tarnished Dark Grungy side: Bah Humbug! Lumps of coal in your stockings.
Dekontaminierter Glanz über alles!!
Gruß Glock!
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Old April 25, 2019, 03:16 AM   #63
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You don't need to replace the air with nitrogen, you can simply remove the oxygen.

The same place that sells vacuum sealers and little dessicant packs will also have oxygen absorbent packs.

For ultimate long lasting bling, final rinse in car wash and wax, dry, tumble in NuFinish infused clean corn cob, then seal in ZipLock or Mylar bags with dessicant and oxygen absorbent packs. Don't expose to direct sunlight thereafter.

The brass will still be shiny long after we've all turned to dust
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Old April 25, 2019, 04:50 AM   #64
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I hunt feral hogs year round with a couple of bigger caliber revolvers and usually carry half dozen or more loose rounds in my pocket. We hunt rain or shine and the cases usually got gunky pretty quick from the moisture or sweat. What has helped both my hunting ammo as well as my polished brass was adding some carnuba chips to my dry tumbling media.

I purchased a quantity of the chipped carnival a while back for making bullet lube. I found adding about a teaspoon to about 2-3# of walnut will apply enough to keep my cases clean and shiney for a longer period of time in the field with little more than air drying if damp or wet from hunting in wet or very humid conditions. It also helps to warm the brass and treated media with a hair dryer or heat gun prior to running the tumbler.

Not sure just how much trouble K's of cases might be but for a couple hundred rounds for hunting it isn't bad at all and the carnuba seems to hold up longer than the car waxes commonly added.

YMMV
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Old April 25, 2019, 07:36 AM   #65
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the dry nitrogen suggestion was made tongue in cheek, although it would solve any tarnish issues. I doubt anyone is anal enough enough to go that far for bling, even on this forum
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Old April 25, 2019, 02:07 PM   #66
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any thought to going all nickel to keep the shine?
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Old April 25, 2019, 02:22 PM   #67
Marco Califo
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I do have some nickle cases. I reserve these for handgun "carry". The primary benefit to nickle is that it is very wear resistant under constant handling or in contact with leather gear.
I do not want "all nickle brass" for several reasons:
1. Nickle plating is not available for 7.62, 223/556, and 7mm-08 to name a couple.
2. Nickle cases tend to chip or crack more than brass when reloaded several times.
3. It costs materially more, usually, when it is available.
4. Someone correct me if I am wrong, but nickle bottleneck brass being full length resized, would lead to chipping cracking and peeling faster when you work the brass by resizing. I have seen game wardens with nickled 308 ammo; I am sure it was bought new, for "carry" loads.
I did once purchase nickle 40 SW once fired. They are great for that caliber. But now I can find brass a lot cheaper.
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Old April 25, 2019, 02:29 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by Marco Califo View Post
I do have some nickle cases. I reserve these for handgun "carry". The primary benefit to nickle is that it is very wear resistant under constant handling or in contact with leather gear.
I do not want "all nickle brass" for several reasons:
1. Nickle plating is not available for 7.62, 223/556, and 7mm-08 to name a couple.
2. Nickle cases tend to chip or crack more than brass when reloaded several times.
3. It costs materially more, usually, when it is available.
4. Someone correct me if I am wrong, but nickle bottleneck brass being full length resized, would lead to chipping cracking and peeling faster when you work the brass by resizing. I have seen game wardens with nickled 308 ammo; I am sure it was bought new, for "carry" loads.
I did once purchase nickle 40 SW once fired. They are great for that caliber. But now I can find brass a lot cheaper.
you mean this nickel plated brass is really just a figment of my imagination?
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/31...ated-box-of-50


https://www.natchezss.com/remington-...m-rem-mag.html
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Old April 25, 2019, 05:10 PM   #69
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I do not use Double Tap brass. Starline, Norma, and Lapua do not have nickle brass for 7mm-08. I can make 7mm-08 from LC 7.62, but no LC brass is nickled. If you are looking for odd stray nickle I can send you ones-ies of SIG, CorBon, And I think Herters. I buy brass generally by the 1,000. Just because someone makes it does not mean I will buy 1,000.
Out of your TWO LINKS one is out of stock and the other is discontinued. So, what was your point?
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Old April 26, 2019, 09:04 AM   #70
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My point was "1. Nickle plating is not available for 7.62, 223/556, and 7mm-08 to name a couple." doesn't seem to be accurate.
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Old April 26, 2019, 10:09 AM   #71
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4. Someone correct me if I am wrong, but nickle bottleneck brass being full length resized, would lead to chipping cracking and peeling faster when you work the brass by resizing. I have seen game wardens with nickled 308 ammo; I am sure it was bought new, for "carry" loads
Correct you? I have no ideal where that would go.

Chipping and pealing? I have never had a nickel case chip and or peal; I have had 38 Special cases with nickel so thin I could see through it from tumbling. What does that mean? The case did not thin while tumbling, the nickel thinned.

Cracking? I have split many nickel plated cases. I form cases, one of my favorite cases for forming is the 280 Remington cases. When necking the 280 Remington case up to 35 Whelen or 338/06 have lots of cases split at the neck. I am not talking about forming/necking up fired cases, I am talking once fired and or new/unfired cases.

Comparison: I have necked up/formed 400 unfired/pull down 30/06 cases to 35 Whelen without splitting one neck, same when forming the 338/06 from 30/06 cases that have not been nickeled.

The forming procedure shorten the case from the end of the neck to the case head .035"+ to .045" when fire forming.

Difficult? I never figured out how reloaders move the case shoulder back and or forward when firing and sizing and then there is that neck getting thicker and or thinner; I can only imagine that has to be a lot of work moving the shoulder and making those case necks thicker and or thinner.

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Old April 26, 2019, 10:12 AM   #72
Marco Califo
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Constrictor, you can shine my brass.
Good luck with that!
Have a nice day
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Last edited by Marco Califo; April 26, 2019 at 11:39 AM.
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Old April 26, 2019, 09:38 PM   #73
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SS pin cleaned brass

Quote:
Marco Califo Of course, in post one I DID NOT ASK does it need to be shiny?
I WANT it shiny, and don't WANT your personal opinions about is shiny necessary?
Quote:
Marco Califo Constrictor, you can shine my brass.
Good luck with that!
Have a nice day
these ^^^ from the guy who so cutely FARTed to get attention. I wonder if any of his rotary tumblers are actually Frankfort Arsenal.
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Old April 27, 2019, 10:39 PM   #74
Marco Califo
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What has helped both my hunting ammo as well as my polished brass was adding some carnuba chips to my dry tumbling media.

I purchased a quantity of the chipped carnival a while back for making bullet lube. I found adding about a teaspoon to about 2-3# of walnut will apply enough to keep my cases clean and shiney for a longer period of time in the field with little more than air drying if damp or wet from hunting in wet or very humid conditions. It also helps to warm the brass and treated media with a hair dryer or heat gun prior to running the tumbler.
Mike /Tx has the best idea yet ^^^^^^^
I bought bees wax chips for the exact same reason, and ran in corn cob. Yes they are shiny. Walnut, dry, I tried too, as Unclenick noted Walnut has oil, and yes it is shiny too. I am glad to hear that you have employed wax successfully!

For bulk wax application, some posted about using Armor All Auto Wash Wax. That is what I will try on my next bulk load. In the final rinse, so a light film stays on each piece, and let dry. Maybe that should be done after the citric acid bath. I will most likely try both.

I also used hotwax on the ends of my steel shotshell reloads. I used then very successfully in marshes.
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Old April 28, 2019, 07:40 AM   #75
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I risne after the wash with Lemeshine and Soap.
I don't rinse after applying car wash wax.
Tried it both ways. Why rinse the water based wax off?
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