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Old May 23, 2021, 11:39 AM   #1
FunGramps
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How to remove stock screws without leaving any damage

I have a new Ruger 10/22 Sporter, and will have to remove the stock in order to switch out the trigger assembly with a new Ruger BX drop-in.

I don't want to scratch up or bugger up the bluing or metal on the screws. Looking for any other advice other than using the right size hollow ground screwdriver?

Thanks in advance!
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Old May 23, 2021, 11:57 AM   #2
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You pretty much hit all the high points with using the right screwdriver. If you have to say to someone, “hold my beer while I take these screws out”, you’d probably be better off waiting till later to do it.
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Old May 23, 2021, 12:05 PM   #3
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Right size screwdriver to begin with.
Secure the workpiece in a padded vise. That helps prevent slippage.
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Old May 23, 2021, 01:44 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoSecondBest View Post
You pretty much hit all the high points with using the right screwdriver. If you have to say to someone, “hold my beer while I take these screws out”, you’d probably be better off waiting till later to do it.
Ha! Thanks.
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Old May 23, 2021, 01:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4V50 Gary View Post
Right size screwdriver to begin with.
Secure the workpiece in a padded vise. That helps prevent slippage.
Makes sense. Thanks. Sounds like I'm set.
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Old May 23, 2021, 03:56 PM   #6
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Likely, will not be a big problem

Quote:
Looking for any other advice other than using the right size hollow ground screwdriver?
It's doubtful that the screw is that tight but regardless, establish the right size driver, and apply two layers or as many as make the fit snug or tight, into the head slot. This will ensure no metal to metal contact. I only use this method on screw-heads that are tight. You really don't need much force not will you cause much damage. Later, if you wish, you can replace the slotted head crew with an allen-head screw. ......

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Old May 23, 2021, 06:54 PM   #7
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Don't use those cheap screwdrivers with standard blades you use for home projects. get the proper hollow-ground gunsmith screwdrivers that actually fit your screws.
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Old May 23, 2021, 10:46 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pahoo View Post
It's doubtful that the screw is that tight but regardless, establish the right size driver, and apply two layers or as many as make the fit snug or tight, into the head slot. This will ensure no metal to metal contact. I only use this method on screw-heads that are tight. You really don't need much force not will you cause much damage. Later, if you wish, you can replace the slotted head crew with an allen-head screw. ......

Be Safe !!!
Thanks. What layers are you speaking of?
And an update. I took out the rifle and it has an allen-screw already, at the rear of the fore-stock, and swivel mounts at the end of the stock and at the rear.
Must be different because it's a sporter model.
So unless the swivel mounts are screwed into metal somehow, there is only one allen screw holding the stock on. The swivel mounts have a hole through them for twisting off.
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Old May 24, 2021, 01:35 AM   #9
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If your 10/22 has a barrel band, remove it. There is one screw holding the action into the stock. Loosen it. Center up the safety button so you don't damage the stock when lifting the action out. Lift the front of the action by lifting the barrel to remove the action from the stock. There is a bedding area at the back of the action that has a mortise that fits into a groove. When putting the action back into the stock, center the safety button and put the rear of the action in first. When the action is seated, screw in the stock bolt.
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Old May 24, 2021, 11:07 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scorch View Post
If your 10/22 has a barrel band, remove it. There is one screw holding the action into the stock. Loosen it. Center up the safety button so you don't damage the stock when lifting the action out. Lift the front of the action by lifting the barrel to remove the action from the stock. There is a bedding area at the back of the action that has a mortise that fits into a groove. When putting the action back into the stock, center the safety button and put the rear of the action in first. When the action is seated, screw in the stock bolt.
Thanks you, Sir. No band on it, just the swivel mount.

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Old May 24, 2021, 11:38 AM   #11
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Sporter has one stock to barrel screw on OEM's

Quote:
Must be different because it's a sporter model.
So unless the swivel mounts are screwed into metal somehow, there is only one allen screw holding the stock on. The swivel mounts have a hole through them for twisting off.
If you have a sporter model, so there is no barrel clamp and I guess I missed that you have a hex-head screw , you should only have one screw just in from of the trigger group. There have always been generational changes and I believe the current generation is a hex-head socket. As far and the sling swivels, they will go with the stock when you pull the barrel. If you have never done this, refer to your manual of go to You-Tube. If I have missed anything else, let me know .....

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Old May 24, 2021, 11:47 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pahoo View Post
If you have a sporter model, so there is no barrel clamp and I guess I missed that you have a hex-head screw , you should only have one screw just in from of the trigger group. There have always been generational changes and I believe the current generation is a hex-head socket. As far and the sling swivels, they will go with the stock when you pull the barrel. If you have never done this, refer to your manual of go to You-Tube. If I have missed anything else, let me know .....

Be Safe !!!!
I think you nailed it. Glad I don't have to mess with the sling swivels.
Thanks again.
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Old June 3, 2021, 02:55 PM   #13
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Start with a wider driver than needed, but the closest you can get to the correct thickness.
Grind it to the exact width of the screw.

Make a note to buy a replacement, and label that one carefully.

If you do not have one thick enough to be tight, use aluminum foil tape (the stuff for ducts) to pad up the screwdriver thickness.
Rub it down tight, and order a thicker one for future use.
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Old June 3, 2021, 07:52 PM   #14
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With the correct sized screwdriver and the gun firmly secured, a rubber mallet can give a little persuasion while applying torque by tapping the end of the screwdriver.

When resecuring the screw, less torque or maybe a few wraps of plumbers tape might help. If it loosens later abandon that idea and get a new screw.
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Old June 10, 2021, 10:42 AM   #15
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Maybe a squirt of penetrating oil the night before, so you don’t have to apply too much force.
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Old June 11, 2021, 12:27 PM   #16
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I've got a couple big common screwdrivers that have a square shaft. A crescent wrench on that square shaft will greatly amplify the torque one can apply.

You can also find a piece of scrap steel heat it and use it to transfer heat to the screw inside the stock. Very handy esp. if Locktite has been used on it. Your nose is your friend when dealing with Locktite. A sweet odor is indicative of getting it hot enough to let go. Must move quickly between application of heat and application of torque.
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Old June 12, 2021, 09:24 AM   #17
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With a slotted screw, after applying penetrating oil, you can put a drop of JB Kwikweld (the wimpy stuff) on the end of the screwdriver and press it into the screw and hold it there until it sets. That takes up extra room from imperfect blade fit. The penetrating oil is the release agent for getting it out after the screw is out and it won't stick to the screwdriver all that well, either, so a spatula blade will scrape it off.

For the socket head screws, I suppose you could do the same thing if your wrench fit seems poor, though cleaning out afterward may be more difficult.
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Old June 12, 2021, 11:39 AM   #18
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Don't use layers of whatever, don't use epoxy, don't use penetrating oil unless the screw is truly stuck.

Use a gunsmith screwdriver with parallel ground tip THAT FITS THE SCREW.

It's not a one size fits all proposition.
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Old June 12, 2021, 05:30 PM   #19
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...and yet, even with the gunsmith's screwdriver carefully selected for fit, I've had screws marred if they were made of soft enough steel. The epoxy just makes a pad that prevents slipping or favoring a slot edge with the force of the blade. It isn't permanent. It's just an extra line of defense.
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Old June 12, 2021, 08:31 PM   #20
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And yet, after all this has been said and done, I would be willing to bet the OP has gotten his action screw out, and gone shooting, and come home, and put the gun away, and probably doesn't even care any more because it's been a month since he asked how to get a screw out.
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Old June 13, 2021, 01:48 PM   #21
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Consider the overflow is for posterity and the next fellow to read.
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Old June 14, 2021, 12:25 PM   #22
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At least we know the answer to "how many forum members does it take to get a screw out?"
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