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Old October 18, 2017, 12:16 AM   #1
ghost town
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considering a new rifle

I am looking for a 22-250 for varmits and target shooting past 400 yards. I plan to reload for it. My budget is about 600 without a scope. Any suggestions on brand or model? I only found 1 with a 9 twist and it was 1000.
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Old October 18, 2017, 01:24 AM   #2
Coloradohtr
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Take a look at the Ruger American Predator. You can get that in a 22-250 for around $449.99. Adjustable trigger from 5-3 pounds, hammer forged 22" free-floating 1:10 twist rate threaded barrel, rotary mag, bedded stock system...pretty much the works and it won't break the bank. Top it off with a 4-12x Vortex Diamondback Tactical. You can pick that up for $299.99. Total the gun and the scope here in Colorado would be around $850.00ish. You could possibly get away with getting a Vortex Crossfire or regular Diamondback for around $149.99-$179.99 as well and that would be around your $600.00 budget but with a good scope with a fantastic lifetime warranty!

I read an article online about the 6.5 Creedmoore American Predator and they had it set up with a Vortex Viper series scope and they said it was a 1,000yd gun all day long for under a grand! So I'm quite sure you can get well past 400yrds with it in a 22-250 for $600.00.

When Ruger first came out with their American series rifles I was a little standoffish. It felt cheap. Too cheap. The bolt raddled too much for my liking and the stock felt thin and weak. However, after I shot one my mind changed. They are very accurate. It's a great little rifle for the money. Something to think about. Good luck.
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Old October 18, 2017, 05:03 PM   #3
BBarn
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A 1 in 10" twist will probably stabilize bullets up to about 65 grains or so depending on construction and the presence or absence of a boat tail. Bullets heavier than about 65grs will require a 1 in 9" or faster for bullet stabilization.

If you choose a twist faster than 1 in 10", you may need to back off the load a little with the some of the lighter varmint bullets to keep velocities below the point at which they self destruct when exiting the barrel. Most of the 22 cal. bullets designed for varmints are in the 40gr. to 55gr. weight range. The heavier bullets are typically preferred for long range shooting and aren't designed to quickly dispatch varmints.
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Old October 18, 2017, 08:29 PM   #4
Don Fischer
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Seem's to me that I read somewhere that the 22-250 was designed to handle 50gr bullet's?
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Old October 18, 2017, 09:06 PM   #5
Troy800
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Tikka T3. They shoot great right out of the box. I just got a T3 lite 243 for my daughter and my handload varmit loads shoot 1/2" and deer loads shoot 3/4".

Im also a fan of the Remington 700. They shoot good out of the box but have amazing aftermarket options if you want to build it up later.

I love the 22-250 for varmit hunting but if you are serious about a long range paper punch there are better options. Since you plan to reload you have alot of great options.
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Old October 18, 2017, 10:05 PM   #6
FrankenMauser
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Get the slow twist and run varmint bullets.
Ruger American is the go-to right now, with the best barrels in the budget class. CZ and Tikka are good options, but you'll pay more.

Or jump to 6mm (.243 Win) to have a better balance if you want "the best of both worlds" (and easier access to 1:9" twist rates).

Remington won't be getting any money from me, nor a recommendation for one of their products, until they removed their heads from their dark places, free themselves from the investment groups, and start making real firearms again.
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Old October 19, 2017, 07:18 AM   #7
Mobuck
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The 22/250 is a primo varmint round but suffers in the wind at longer ranges. There are far better long range paper target rounds.
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Old October 19, 2017, 03:16 PM   #8
NHSHOOTER
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Weatherby Vanguard S2 cant be beat for the money, get the 22-250 and a 243, can never have too many guns..
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Old October 20, 2017, 05:44 AM   #9
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I gotta side with the other guys who recommend the .243. Two of mine have never been fed anything over 58gr and they are a sight to behold on pasture poodles and yotes.

For the longest while I also wanted a .22-250, mostly because I've never had one, but I realized the .243 can just about do anything a .22-250 can on the lighter end. But moving up to the heavier weights, the .243 low bc bullet offerings will shine like a diamond in a billygoats hiney compared to what the other will manage at distance.
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Old October 20, 2017, 06:54 AM   #10
Mobuck
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Back in the early 80's, a 22/250 paid for a goodly share of my groceries. Between coyote fur and "barnyard matches", I paid bills and put macaroni on the table.
I'd bet whatever pocket cash I had with any taker @ 400 yards. We'd tack 2 of whatever denomination bills side x side (edges touching) on the side of an abandoned shed and if I put a 22/250 bullet anywhere on that 7"x 7" spot, I got both bills. I picked my days and conditions but it sure impressed a lot of folks. This wouldn't be considered extraordinary today but it was exceptional 40 years ago.
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Old October 21, 2017, 11:55 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mobuck View Post
Back in the early 80's, a 22/250 paid for a goodly share of my groceries. Between coyote fur and "barnyard matches", I paid bills and put macaroni on the table.
I'd bet whatever pocket cash I had with any taker @ 400 yards. We'd tack 2 of whatever denomination bills side x side (edges touching) on the side of an abandoned shed and if I put a 22/250 bullet anywhere on that 7"x 7" spot, I got both bills. I picked my days and conditions but it sure impressed a lot of folks. This wouldn't be considered extraordinary today but it was exceptional 40 years ago.


Sounds like fun!


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Old October 22, 2017, 08:45 AM   #12
Picher
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I've had a couple of .22-250s that took down lots of woodchucks, crows, and even a couple of deer. It was best at rifle turkey shoots where it won me many frozen turkeys (100 yard, one-shot, closest to center matches).

The problems I had with the cartridge:

1. The case is tapered and stretches a lot, but if you don't handload, that's not an issue.

2. I had Remington 700s and twist of 1/10 wouldn't stabilize even 60 grain bullets, but was fine with 52-55 grain pills.

3. When I started woodchuck hunting in my teens, as practice for deer hunting, a couple of us used our 30-06 hunting rifles with 125 grain bullets. If we missed low, the bullet fragments would bounce up and get the critters, or bullet strikes often would be visible through binoculars. When we switched to the .22-250, misses were generally invisible. We didn't have range finders in those days (late 50s).

4. I found that, in springtime, the bullets blew around too much for longer shots. I switched to the 6mm Rem and it worked better.
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Old October 22, 2017, 09:58 AM   #13
eastbank
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my bitch with the 22-250 out past 300+ yards was a lot of groundhogs would make it into their dens to die a slow death, it did not take a lot of wind to move the bullets 2-3" off at out past 300 yards and that wounded a lot of hogs. eastbank.
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