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Old November 12, 2018, 12:48 PM   #51
dgludwig
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Before I retired twenty years ago, my agency required bi-annual firearm qualifications. Most of the regimen involved drawing a pistol from a thumb-break holster from under a jacket and fire two shots within two seconds. My mantra was to acquire the proper grip first; everything else followed. Though getting a "perfect" purchase on the grip every time during the draw during qualifications or while competing in matches is possible with proper training and much practice, the same can't be necessarily said when drawing a pistol in an uncontrolled and unpredictable self-defense scenario.
Slippery hands from rain, blood or sweat; drawing a weapon while sitting in a car and the holster jammed in the seat behind a safety belt or drawing a gun while grappling with an adversary are just a few examples when a "perfect" grip is compromised by circumstance. Because the perfect grip will not always be possible to acquire, speaking for myself, I will never rely on any pistol being carried for self-defense that requires a perfect grip to function reliably, no matter the brand or reputation.
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Last edited by dgludwig; November 12, 2018 at 03:33 PM.
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Old November 12, 2018, 01:24 PM   #52
Lohman446
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The need for a "perfect" grip can be drastically overstated. I understand that the OP has a very particular issue and that other comparable pistols don't have that issue for him. It doesn't matter exactly where the fault lies in that. As he is not required to use a particular pistol switching seems a simple enough answer.

I have never experienced such an issue and I assure you that my form, including my grip, is FAR from perfect.
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Old Yesterday, 02:20 PM   #53
Dave T
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Over a dozen Glocks over the years and I have never had a problem with them functioning. The OP on the other hand seems to have problems all the time.

It would seem self evident the OP should not own, shoot, or carry Glocks.

If they work for you fine. If they don't work for you...fine! Why all the grousing about it? Oh yea, people like to beat up on Glocks. Well if that works for you go ahead but I'm not reading any more of this. (smile)

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Old Yesterday, 02:32 PM   #54
stagpanther
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To the OP--when you say "boom, jam"--what actually happens when the gun jams? Be sure to describe as accurately as you can the actual jam prior to "fussing" with the gun.
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Old Yesterday, 07:42 PM   #55
Josh17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave T View Post
Over a dozen Glocks over the years and I have never had a problem with them functioning. The OP on the other hand seems to have problems all the time.

It would seem self evident the OP should not own, shoot, or carry Glocks.

If they work for you fine. If they don't work for you...fine! Why all the grousing about it? Oh yea, people like to beat up on Glocks. Well if that works for you go ahead but I'm not reading any more of this. (smile)

Dave
lol I love Glocks and think they are superior to other handguns due to their simplicity and so few parts. I believe reliability is king.

Now I have owned basically only Glocks my entire life and this problem is relatively new. I mainly noticed it once I started to go to the range for the first time ever regularly. Also I hurt my wrist this year so that didn’t help.

I’ve shot more this year then all the previous years in my life put together.

So Glocks are damn good guns and I hate to have to sell them all, but all the compacts I guess don’t work for me anymore for whatever reason. The Glock 19 is basically 100% unless I purposely tried to induce a limp wrist failure. Even when I do normally the Glock 19 has a failure to feed from trying to limp wrist it.
While if I purposely try to induce a limp wrist on a Glock 43 it’ll normally have a stovepipe, or a failure to feed. So it seems the smaller the gun the worse it is. Which makes sense.

But like I said I decided to move past Glock and try something else that has worked for me, like S&W shield, etc.
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