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Old August 13, 2018, 11:56 AM   #1
WIN1886
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28 gauge for upland birds ?

Been looking at a new Ithaca pump in 28 gauge for all day carry in the woods tracking down ruff grouse . I have a 20 gauge o/u i use as well but really would like another smaller gauge shotgun for fun and light carry weight . Anyway , not being familiar with the 28 gauge I wonder how effective is on upland game out to similar ranges in comparison to 20 gauge upland loads . I guess having a 12 and 20 gauge already I want an excuse to get the 28 gauge to try and see how I like it !
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Old August 13, 2018, 12:00 PM   #2
eastbank
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one oz # 6,s from Winchester hi brass factory shells drops ring necks dead out of a modified choke to 30-35 yards, maybe longer on a good day, but I,m hunting over dogs.
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Old August 13, 2018, 12:34 PM   #3
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The 28 is my favorite for upland birds. One friend and his girlfriend use their 28s every year hunting wild birds in Montana with great success.
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Old August 13, 2018, 02:15 PM   #4
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Oops, ruffed grouse , think I'd remember that after a couple decades of hunting them ! :roll eyes: Nice replies , thank you !
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Old August 13, 2018, 03:16 PM   #5
Don Fischer
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Have only shot a couple grouse with my 28 and it worked fine Have shot a bunch of training pigeons over dog's with it and love it. 3/4oz load is all I use. It's all I carry hunting anymore but birds around here are hard to come by anymore. Getting another in a month or so. I figure if I need more than 3/4oz, I need my 16ga.
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Old August 13, 2018, 03:17 PM   #6
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The older I get the more I find myself grabbing the 20GA instead of the 12GA. I just don't see why a dove needs a 12GA, etc.. Being that as it is, I can see myself enjoying the hell out of a 28GA someday. Sure, why not? Like you said, you don't have one yet so you need to go get one and see if you like it.
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Old August 13, 2018, 05:23 PM   #7
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I like the 28 and the .410 for pen raised quail. I've never hunted grouse.
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Old August 13, 2018, 06:32 PM   #8
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grouse are not overly hard to kill, being light boned. I use 3/4 oz # 7.5 and when hit they tend to fold up and go down.
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Old August 13, 2018, 09:33 PM   #9
colbad
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I always wanted a 28g for dove and quail. Got too easy shooting both with 20g. I have browning 20g o/u ultra light. That would be my choice for a 28g. Came close to getting it for about $1500. Shells are on pricy side.
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Old August 14, 2018, 05:00 AM   #10
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Hunting over setters in the western upper of Mich for close to a life time says a Browning 20ga Upland or a Browning Lighting 28ga will make a guy smile, a lot!
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Old August 14, 2018, 06:30 AM   #11
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Quote:
I always wanted a 28g for dove and quail. Got too easy shooting both with 20g. I have browning 20g o/u ultra light. That would be my choice for a 28g. Came close to getting it for about $1500. Shells are on pricy side.
If you reload, ClayBuster wads makes a 20 gauge 3/4oz wad that works great (They also make a 3/4oz wad for 12 ga)
Otherwise, if you buy a flat (or up to 5) of Winchester AA ammo from Academy during Winchester's rebate time, your cost is $7/box. If you know skeet/sporting shooters who reload, hou can easily sell the once-fired hulls for .012 each so knock another $3 off per box, making your final cost $4/box
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Old August 14, 2018, 07:49 AM   #12
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If you get the Ithaca 28 gauge, you will like it. Very fast handling gun, light weight
and the stocks are made just right. The new Ithaca's are made tighter and better than before. Quality is outstanding, wood is of better quality than many other makes.

Yes I like Ithaca's, been to the factory seen how they make them.
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Old August 16, 2018, 04:37 AM   #13
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the price is a little high for the new Ithaca,s, I use a older rem 870 light weight 20 with good effect on upland game.
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Old August 16, 2018, 07:06 AM   #14
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The Ithaca 28 gauge model 37 is made to order. So it is fairly cheap for a bespoke
shotgun. The 28 is on it's own frame and handles better than many others.
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Old August 16, 2018, 06:45 PM   #15
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I must be going retro in my older/retired years. Been upland hunting forever with my '75 870 Wingmaster. Now, I'm looking hard at a Mossberg International SA-28. And, I just bought a Henry Big Boy Classic in .357/.38. Oh, my 870 is a 20ga, no vent rib.
OP, get that 28ga!
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Old August 17, 2018, 08:06 AM   #16
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My go to grouse guns are a 28 gauge Mossberg Silver Reserve II and an Ithaca 37 English Ultralite 20 gauge made in the mid 1980's. I have .22 rifles that weigh more than the Ithaca. Both are a joy to carry in the woods and readily drop ruffs if i do my part.
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Old August 17, 2018, 08:27 AM   #17
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For upland birds, I bought the first edition of the ..

Ruger Red Label in 20ga nad the SKT/SKT, chokings.

Next best shotgun is a 1956 M37 16GA.

Go ahead and give it a try!

Good Luck.
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Old August 17, 2018, 10:07 AM   #18
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Remington model 1100 28ga works for me.
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Old August 17, 2018, 12:10 PM   #19
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Quote:
Remington model 1100 28ga works for me.
I had one of those; it threw my empties into the next county; and those hulls are too expensive to lose!
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Old August 17, 2018, 06:25 PM   #20
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A 28 Gauge is definitely going to be an "expert's gun", but if you enjoy using the smaller shells and a lighter carry weight in the field, then go for it! Just know that you'll really have to master it before heading out to the field.
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Old August 18, 2018, 09:13 AM   #21
Don Fischer
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I find myself shooting at more pigeons over the dog's with my 410 anymore. Gonna try it on grouse this year if I can find some. But something I think is probably more fact is that a 3/4oz load from a 12ga will give a better pattern, if you check them, I don't, than a 28 with the same 3/4oz load. What the 28 will do far better is carry all day! When I shot a 12ga the heaviest loads I ever used the last ten years or so were 1 1/2oz target's loads, I adjusted the size of the shot! In my 16ga, I like 1 oz target's loads with heavier shot. I don't shoot and haven't in a lot of years a 20ga, just never turned me on. My 28 get's 3/4oz loads of either 7 1/2's or 6's.haven't started loading the 410 yet but use a lot of 1/2oz #6 loads and they work fine! If I were to hunt pheasant with my 28, never know, I might jump up to 5 shot. Less shot but heavier takes less shot to make a clean kill! Oh, and I only shoot birds over pointing dogs!
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Old August 19, 2018, 11:17 AM   #22
WIN1886
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Thanks for replies , I'm hoping I can get a 28 gauge before this fall hunting season and get some practice with it !
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Old August 23, 2018, 01:35 PM   #23
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Buffered 28 gauge load data.

Tom Roster's Buffered Lead & Bismuth Reloading Manual has some excellent pressure tested 28 gauge 7/8 ounce buffered load data
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Old August 25, 2018, 10:35 AM   #24
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Back to basics

When we pattern our shotguns and analyze those patterns it's important that we remember how the smaller bore diameter affects the pattern.
I think it's the analysis of those patterns on paper that require our memory to be "jogged"

A quick google search will reveal this. Look at high speed photography of shotgun patterns.
The pattern is 3 dimensional, as bore size decreases the pattern becomes "longer" in relation to it's overall diameter.

In addition the weight of each individual pellet varies slightly. This of course also contributes to the "length" of that cloud of shot.

We could choose to shoot 20 gauge guns on the trap field if we wanted to. The Max. size of the shot payload can be easily met with 20 gauge.

Very few folks shoot 20 gauge guns for trap. It's the pattern that is lacking.
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Old August 25, 2018, 11:40 AM   #25
David R
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Any grouse I hunt flush from really close. A 410 works fine if I am quick enough. I seem to get a little more range with my 20 ga. I do not use a dog.

Never used a 28, but if a 410 will do it ...

David

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