The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: General

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old April 6, 2021, 06:53 PM   #1
Ruger4Life
Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2010
Posts: 62
Why Single Shot Rifles Are Great

I own 5 Single shot rifles, and no other rifles. Here are the reasons why:

1.) The “nostalgia factor”. The first firearms invented were in the 12th/13th century (if memory serves). Not only that, but single shots were the determining factor in the outcome of many battles and wars over the centuries. Very interesting history if you read up on how warfare changed from steel blades to steel smokepoles.

2.) The US war of independence was won by highly-skilled average colonialists, who used single shot rifles and pistols. These men and their families put meat on the table and raised our ancestors partially on wild game that they hunted and harvested. There is a very cool factor in that.

3.) “Mountain Men” and “settlers/pioneers”! These people “tamed” and “settled” the land primarily with single shots until the late 1800’s. Although I am Native American, and I do not agree with the “eminent domain” policy of “western expansion”; the undeniable fact is that single shots tamed the frontier.

4.) Single shots make a person more accurate ( in most instances). If a person knows that they have only one shot to take down game, or hit the x-ring in competition, they use more caution; less temptation to “spray and pray”.

5.) Single shots push shooters to exercise proper shooting skills; breathing control, target/sight acquisition, and trigger control!

6.) Single shots require considerably less maintenance (I’m talking about the break-open style that I own. Easy-peasy clean-up that only takes 10 minutes. Try that with a bolt action, semi-auto, or lever action. To easily clean a rifle without completely disassembling the entire action (bolt and trigger assembly) is a bonus!

7.) Simplicity! The fewer moving parts, the fewer things can go wrong (as a general rule of thumb). Single shots last a LONG time because of this.

8.) Single action, single shot firearms can be safely stored loaded, with the hammer down, for indefinite periods of time without undue wear/ stress on the hammer/firing pin spring. Fewer stress on the parts, just like a lever action.

I would appreciate any input from you single-shot owners that have thought of something that I didn’t!
__________________
"Smith and Wessons are Thoroughbreds, Rugers are Clydesdales" --John Taffin

Last edited by Ruger4Life; April 7, 2021 at 04:20 PM. Reason: Update
Ruger4Life is offline  
Old April 6, 2021, 10:06 PM   #2
idek
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 20, 2009
Posts: 894
#9) ambidextrous (I'm a lefty and find the lack of bolt-action options frustrating)

#10) compact receivers--the very short receivers make them at least 3" shorter than most repeaters with the same barrel length (making them handy in dense woods). Or you can have an extra 3+" of barrel for greater velocity (in some cases) and less muzzle blast while having the same overall length as a repeater.

Ruger4Life, what models do you have? I've owned 4 NEF/H&R's. I still have the two shotguns but sold the two rifles. I didn't like trying to mount optics above or in front of the high hammer spur and the triggers weren't particularly good. I've been curious about CVA offerings but have never had a chance to handle one.

Last edited by idek; April 6, 2021 at 10:31 PM.
idek is offline  
Old April 6, 2021, 10:25 PM   #3
Ruger4Life
Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2010
Posts: 62
Idek, I own 4 CVA single shots. I used to own a NEF 30-30, and I wish I had never sold it. They are quality, accurate firearms!
__________________
"Smith and Wessons are Thoroughbreds, Rugers are Clydesdales" --John Taffin
Ruger4Life is offline  
Old April 6, 2021, 10:29 PM   #4
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 23,200
Quote:
I would appreciate any input from you single-shot owners that have thought of something that I didn’t!
Single shots are cool. However I think some of your generalities are bit overbroad.

Yes, single shots were the determining factor in many battles, but only during the era of their dominance in firearm designs. Edged metal (swords, axes, pikes, spears and arrows) were the determining factor for much longer (since the bronze age). Practical repeating firearms arrived in the 1800s (Colt Paterson revolver, for one)and by the end of the Civil War were firmly established. By the 1890s single shot arms for military use were generally being replaced by repeaters.

Next point, those colonists and pioneers used single shots because there was nothing better. Yes, they were cool and there is considerable history and nostalgia today, but understand that they didn't choose those guns because they were single shots, everything was single shot in those days.

Quote:
8.) Single action, single shot firearms can be safely stored loaded, with the hammer down, for indefinite periods of time without undue wear/ stress on the hammer spring.
No they all aren't safe, with a live round in the chamber and the hammer down. Some are, many are not. If you're not familiar with the classic Colt Peacemaker, do some reading. Many other designs from that era and even later are also not safe with the hammer down on a live round.

Second point, I have Ruger No1s and No.3s, fine single shot rifles, which have internal hammers. No external hammer to lower, and I really, really would not recommend closing them with the trigger pulled and a live round in the chamber.

I also have bolt action single shots, as well as break action single shots, with and without exposed hammers.

There is no question that when all you have is a single shot, its a big motivator to make that one shot count.
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is offline  
Old April 6, 2021, 10:39 PM   #5
Ruger4Life
Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2010
Posts: 62
Good points, except the Colt Peacemaker. Those revolvers were never meant to be single shots, and were loaded with an empty chamber under the hammer, for safety reasons. I was discussing strictly single shots, not revolvers. Thank you for pointing out the ambidextrous factor of single shots; that one slipped my mind!
__________________
"Smith and Wessons are Thoroughbreds, Rugers are Clydesdales" --John Taffin
Ruger4Life is offline  
Old April 6, 2021, 11:43 PM   #6
hammie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 18, 2009
Location: Temple, TX
Posts: 789
@ruger4life: I love single shot rifles, but the statement that the hunter has only one shot might be qualified. "Break opens" are slow to reload but with a little practice a falling block can be reloaded pretty quickly. A dear friend hunted with a 7x57 ruger #1A, with an elastic canvas cartridge holder on the butt stock. All he had to do was drop the breach lever, pick a cartridge from the holder, and slam the breach lever up. The rifle never leaves the shoulder. On a hunt, I heard three shots in quick succession. It almost sounded like an auto loader, but it was my friend bagging a large mule deer. I'm too old for hunting now, but if I should go again, my deer rifle would be my ruger #1, chambered for .303 British, and I wouldn't feel handicapped.

I'm not knocking break opens either. When production gets back to normal, my next rifle will be a henry single shot, chambered for .44 Rem mag.
hammie is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 07:18 AM   #7
old roper
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 11, 2007
Posts: 2,031
I have #1 that I hunt with (not every year) and with our elk/deer season during the winter it takes more than just wiping it off. The #1 I have if you open it and empty shell hit the tang safety so to me not as fast as bolt action.

http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=114262

My other 2 #1 have same deal on fired case.
__________________
Semper Fi
Vietnam 1965
VFW Life member
NRA Life Member
old roper is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 02:41 PM   #8
Paul B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 28, 1999
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 3,422
Sometimes in the early 80's one of my co-workers was visited by his father. We were talking about rifles and such an he lamented that he could not find a left handed rifle in .375 H&H magnum. I suggested he look at a Ruger #1 in .375 H&H and he said they're too slow. I invited him out for a trip in the desert and bought my Ruger #1 .300 Win. Mag. along. We kicked up a jackrabbit and I missed with the first shot and nailed it with the second. I told him that if he made the first shot good he wouldn't need a second.
I heard from him about a year later. He bought a #1 in .375 H&H and took it to Africa. He brought home five nice trophies.
Paul B.
__________________
COMPROMISE IS NOT AN OPTION!
Paul B. is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 03:07 PM   #9
stagpanther
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 2, 2014
Posts: 8,425
My CVA single-shots are among the best values out there, for around $200/225 you can get a bergara barreled weapon ready to go.
__________________
If you’re ever hiking in the woods and you get lost, just look up and find the brightest star in the sky and you’ll know which way space is.
I am NOT an expert--I do not have any formal experience or certification in firearms use or testing; use any information I post at your own risk!
stagpanther is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 03:37 PM   #10
stinkeypete
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 22, 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 816
Light weight. Carry your spare ammo in your pocket or a few on your wrist band, not hanging under your receiver!

Break Down Small! Usually just one pin and you have little small parts to wrap up and stuff in a padded sack.
__________________
I hunt, shoot bullseye, plink, reload, and tinker with firearms. I have hung out with the Cowboy Action fellas. I have no interest in carrying firearms in urban areas.
stinkeypete is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 03:45 PM   #11
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 14,571
I have an original Winchester 1885 in 40-70 WCF. I have been tempted to go shoot a free-range bison with it, but otherwise I see no use for a single shot over a repeater except to be a personal challenge to the shooter.

Nostalgia is no doubt one of the primary reason people shoot single shot rifles, and as such is typically based on stereotypes of what was and how it was. Not a single one of those mountain men, colonial Minute Men, or Union or Confederate soldiers, or even any of the native warrriors who wouldn't have traded their single shot rifles for a good repeater, as witnessed by the explosion of lever-action repeaters after the Civil War.

Single shot rifles do not make a person more accurate, focus on discipline and marksmanship basics do.

Simplicity? Nope. I am a gunsmith and I will tell you that most of the higher quality single shots are just as complex as a repeater, and the lower quality single shots aren't worth the price due to their lack of durability. That's the primary reason so many were sold to the Native Americans after the Civil war, no need to sell the natives the good stuff because you might have to fight them someday.

If you shoot a bolt action rifle 3,000-5,000 rounds, the barrel may be worn out but the receiver and trigger group are in as good a condition as ever. Same with high quality single-shot rifles. But many lower quality single shots will show considerable wear on frame and barrel after as few as 1,000 shots.

Also, the cheaper single shots typically have awful triggers.

Now, I'm not here to burst your bubble. If you want to shoot single shot rifles, go for it. If you truly enjoy shooting single shot rifles, hallelujah! Enjoy! But to me the cheaper single shots just are not gratifying to shoot after having higher quality firearms. Ruger, Heym, Blaser, Hoeck, those are some of the best rifles ever made, single shot or no.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services

Last edited by Scorch; April 7, 2021 at 03:51 PM.
Scorch is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 04:21 PM   #12
dgludwig
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 12, 2005
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,316
Quote:
Single shot rifles do not make a person more accurate, focus on discipline and marksmanship basics do.
Great points! I also get tired of hearing the ridiculous argument that high capacity magazines and/or semi-auto actions promote "pray and spray" shooting behavior. There is no substitute for proper training and sportsmanlike conduct regardless of what type of firearm is being used.

Two of my favorite rifles are a Browning LowWall and a Ruger No.1, mostly because of how short they are with longer barrels and how cool they look.
__________________
ONLY AN ARMED PEOPLE CAN BE TRULY FREE ; ONLY AN UNARMED PEOPLE CAN EVER BE ENSLAVED
...Aristotle
NRA Benefactor Life Member
dgludwig is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 06:33 PM   #13
Shadow9mm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 21, 2012
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 1,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruger4Life View Post
I own 5 Single shot rifles, and no other rifles. Here are the reasons why:
Quote:
1.) The “nostalgia factor”. The first firearms invented were in the 12th/13th century (if memory serves). Not only that, but single shots were the determining factor in the outcome of many battles and wars over the centuries. Very interesting history if you read up on how warfare changed from steel blades to steel smokepoles.
Nostalgia is cool, but is somewhat subjective. It appeals to some but not others. you could apply the same philosophy to hunting with a spear, as some people do.

Quote:
2.) The US war of independence was won by highly-skilled average colonialists, who used single shot rifles and pistols. These men and their families put meat on the table and raised our ancestors partially on wild game that they hunted and harvested. There is a very cool factor in that.
there is a cool factor. but I guarantee you every single last one of them would have grabbed a modern firearm if available

Quote:
3.) “Mountain Men” and “settlers/pioneers”! These people “tamed” and “settled” the land primarily with single shots until the late 1800’s. Although I am Native American, and I do not agree with the “eminent domain” policy of “western expansion”; the undeniable fact is that single shots tamed the frontier.
Again back to nostalgia. If they had a choice of modern firearms, they would have taken them.
Quote:
4.) Single shots make a person more accurate ( in most instances). If a person knows that they have only one shot to take down game, or hit the x-ring in competition, they use more caution; less temptation to “spray and pray”.
No they do not. only practice can make one more accurate. With that said having only 1 shot will make a shooter take greater care with their shot choice.

Quote:
5.) Single shots push shooters to exercise proper shooting skills; breathing control, target/sight acquisition, and trigger control!
i feel this is an extension of #4. no they do not. that is all down to fundamental marksmanship. it is all how hard a shooter, or the person teaching them, pushes them.

Quote:
6.) Single shots require considerably less maintenance (I’m talking about the break-open style that I own. Easy-peasy clean-up that only takes 10 minutes. Try that with a bolt action, semi-auto, or lever action. To easily clean a rifle without completely disassembling the entire action (bolt and trigger assembly) is a bonus!
yes for semi autos. and lever guns. not so much for bolt guns. pull the bolt. your good to go. To me it is easier as i dont have to hold the action open and keep it from closing while I am cleaning.

Quote:
7.) Simplicity! The fewer moving parts, the fewer things can go wrong (as a general rule of thumb). Single shots last a LONG time because of this.
Fewer moving parts can make a gun more reliable. it really depends on the quality of the parts, and the thought put into the design.

Quote:
8.) Single action, single shot firearms can be safely stored loaded, with the hammer down, for indefinite periods of time without undue wear/ stress on the hammer/firing pin spring. Fewer stress on the parts, just like a lever action.
Springs wear from movement, being cycled. not from being under load. as long as they are not over compressed or pulled back to far, going back to design, they will last a long time. constantly cocking and un cocking will wear the spring more than just leaving it back.

Quote:
I would appreciate any input from you single-shot owners that have thought of something that I didn’t!
I have owned single shots. do not own any currently. one other thing I would note is general shorter over all length. Due to there being no action to speak of they are generally several inches shorter over all for the same barrel length.
__________________
I don't believe in "range fodder" that is why I reload.
Shadow9mm is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 08:23 PM   #14
Ruger4Life
Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2010
Posts: 62
Well, thanks for trying to shoot me down on every point! No worries! Some single-shot owners agree. Fans of other types of rifles generally do not. I am US Army retired, and small arms repair (up to howitzers) were my job/specialty. I know ALL types of firearms, and how they function (including fully automatic), and have inspected/cleaned/repaired/fired thousands of them. Perhaps, since I am a fan of the simplicity of single shots, and also a student of firearms history, I should have clarified my background. I’ve trained many soldiers on the shooting range as well. Your typical average joe, when learning how to shoot, will always exercise better shooting technique shooting single-shot, when they know they will not have follow-up shots. Hand a newbie 10, 20, or 30 round mags, and they become sloppy. Hell, most of the natives I trained in Afghanistan were better marksmen with their AK’s than our soldiers were with M4’s! Why? Ammunition was a precious commodity, and they never knew when they could get more; thus, every shot must count! Mind you, I’m not shooting you down. I love the challenge of going to the woods with a single-shot BP rifle. Maybe I should have put that in the OP!
__________________
"Smith and Wessons are Thoroughbreds, Rugers are Clydesdales" --John Taffin
Ruger4Life is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 08:28 PM   #15
ammo.crafter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 25, 2006
Location: The Keystone State
Posts: 1,784
one shot

With practice, reloading a single shot rifle is quite fast.

I have switched almost entirely to single shots for hunting deer-size creatures and find the 7x30 Waters a perfect combination; light weight, low recoil and natural swing.
__________________
"The Constitution is not an instrument for government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government, lest it come to dominate our lives and interests."
Patrick Henry, American Patriot
ammo.crafter is offline  
Old April 7, 2021, 10:42 PM   #16
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 23,200
Quote:
Good points, except the Colt Peacemaker. Those revolvers were never meant to be single shots, and were loaded with an empty chamber under the hammer, for safety reasons.
While not a single shot, I chose the Peacemaker as a famous example of the risks inherent with a live round under the hammer in older firearms designs.

In a great many of the older designs, rifles, shotguns and pistols, when the hammer is down it is resting on the firing pin and a blow to the hammer is transmitted to the firing pin, possibly firing the chambered round.

More modern designs with "rebounding" hammers (or whatever the company calls it) where the hammer is not resting on the firing pin when lowered (and only strikes the pin when "dropped" in firing) are safer.

I do enjoy single shots, and they are both the beginner's gun and the expert's gun. They don't make a shooter more accurate, but they do promote more focus on the task at hand and done right, that improves the shooter.
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is offline  
Old April 8, 2021, 06:40 AM   #17
stagpanther
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 2, 2014
Posts: 8,425
I honestly haven't noticed any more difficulty holding my single shots--in fact, I think the reverse is true, though the break-open pistols in higher power cartridges definitely demand attention to a steady hold--but then what handgun doesn't?
__________________
If you’re ever hiking in the woods and you get lost, just look up and find the brightest star in the sky and you’ll know which way space is.
I am NOT an expert--I do not have any formal experience or certification in firearms use or testing; use any information I post at your own risk!
stagpanther is offline  
Old April 8, 2021, 09:34 AM   #18
Carl the Floor Walker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 3, 2017
Posts: 1,031
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruger4Life View Post
I own 5 Single shot rifles, and no other rifles. Here are the reasons why:

1.) The “nostalgia factor”. The first firearms invented were in the 12th/13th century (if memory serves). Not only that, but single shots were the determining factor in the outcome of many battles and wars over the centuries. Very interesting history if you read up on how warfare changed from steel blades to steel smokepoles.

2.) The US war of independence was won by highly-skilled average colonialists, who used single shot rifles and pistols. These men and their families put meat on the table and raised our ancestors partially on wild game that they hunted and harvested. There is a very cool factor in that.

3.) “Mountain Men” and “settlers/pioneers”! These people “tamed” and “settled” the land primarily with single shots until the late 1800’s. Although I am Native American, and I do not agree with the “eminent domain” policy of “western expansion”; the undeniable fact is that single shots tamed the frontier.

4.) Single shots make a person more accurate ( in most instances). If a person knows that they have only one shot to take down game, or hit the x-ring in competition, they use more caution; less temptation to “spray and pray”.

5.) Single shots push shooters to exercise proper shooting skills; breathing control, target/sight acquisition, and trigger control!

6.) Single shots require considerably less maintenance (I’m talking about the break-open style that I own. Easy-peasy clean-up that only takes 10 minutes. Try that with a bolt action, semi-auto, or lever action. To easily clean a rifle without completely disassembling the entire action (bolt and trigger assembly) is a bonus!

7.) Simplicity! The fewer moving parts, the fewer things can go wrong (as a general rule of thumb). Single shots last a LONG time because of this.

8.) Single action, single shot firearms can be safely stored loaded, with the hammer down, for indefinite periods of time without undue wear/ stress on the hammer/firing pin spring. Fewer stress on the parts, just like a lever action.

I would appreciate any input from you single-shot owners that have thought of something that I didn’t!
To the OP, some great points. I too believe a single shot rifle does slow the shooter down to make more accurate shots. Recently watched a group of NRA boy scouts shooting Henry 22. cals and just shooting up a lot of ammo and not focusing on just one shot.
I am a Air Rifle enthusiast and have been shooting Break Barrel rifles for decades. One shot. There is a lot to be said for taking the time to be slow and becoming one with the gun, the wind, the sun and yourself.
While the gun itself may not make a difference, I believe it is a Psychological difference of knowing that you have to have precision and make that one shot count.
One of my favorite shooting time is what I call "leaf Shooting" with a Pellet rifle. One single shot to hit the leaf vein in the center. I choose a day with a slight wind so the leaves are moving. There is a precise time the leaf will stop and you can make a shot. It takes a lot of Patience. I find myself so involved that time goes by so fast. I get lost in just that one shot. Try it, it takes skill, (at least for myself) and I can do this from my back yard. More practice each week than I can get going to a range.

Here is a pic on one day. What good would it be for me to have a multi-shot gun, I would just have to start the whole process over again to make the shot. One SHOT matters. Each hole in a leaf took TIME. They were not rapid fire shots. Some holes took as long as 20 min or more to make.

Last edited by Carl the Floor Walker; April 9, 2021 at 05:00 AM.
Carl the Floor Walker is offline  
Old April 8, 2021, 02:17 PM   #19
jmr40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 15, 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 10,275
I never cared for single shot's. MOST of them are poorly made cheap budget guns. I realize there are some very nice, well made examples, but those are much less common and are more expensive than a comparable quality bolt or lever action rifle which I much prefer.

MOST of them are less accurate than a bolt gun. I also realize there are exceptions to the rule, but it is simply harder to make a single shot as accurate as a bolt rifle, which is pretty simple. Unless you're talking about the single shot bolt guns.

I don't consider any of the OP's advantages to be valid compared to other guns. Nostalgia being the only real positive

The one positive that most single shots to have is a shorter overall length for the same barrel length. Many single shots offer the ballistic advantages of having a 26" barrel with the same overall length as a repeater with a 22" barrel.
__________________
"If you're still doing things the same way you were doing them 10 years ago, you're doing it wrong"

Winston Churchill
jmr40 is offline  
Old April 8, 2021, 02:25 PM   #20
Carl the Floor Walker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 3, 2017
Posts: 1,031
My next rifle before the Shortage was going to be a Henry single shot, but was having a hard time trying to figure out what caliber I wanted. I did get a BP, but still thinking about caliber. I do not shoot long range so 350 ledgend might be my choice if things return do normal. (Provided I am still alive)

Defending the Single Shot Rifle

https://www.rifleshootermag.com/edit...ot-rifle/83812

Last edited by Carl the Floor Walker; April 8, 2021 at 02:33 PM.
Carl the Floor Walker is offline  
Old April 8, 2021, 04:38 PM   #21
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 6,253
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmr40 View Post
I never cared for single shot's. MOST of them are poorly made cheap budget guns. I realize there are some very nice, well made examples, but those are much less common and are more expensive than a comparable quality bolt or lever action rifle which I much prefer.

MOST of them are less accurate than a bolt gun. I also realize there are exceptions to the rule, but it is simply harder to make a single shot as accurate as a bolt rifle, which is pretty simple. Unless you're talking about the single shot bolt guns.

I don't consider any of the OP's advantages to be valid compared to other guns. Nostalgia being the only real positive

The one positive that most single shots to have is a shorter overall length for the same barrel length. Many single shots offer the ballistic advantages of having a 26" barrel with the same overall length as a repeater with a 22" barrel.
You are comparing the worst of the single shots (cheap break-open) to the best of the repeaters. The single shots I have owned (Browning and Ruger #1s) included the most accurate rifle I have ever owned...a 6mm Reimignton in a Browning B78. The three Browning single shots were the most attractive rifles I have ever owned (B78 in 45-70, B78 in 6mm Remington, B85 in .22 Hornet (a low wall)). The Ruger #1s in .375 H&H and 30-06 were not exactly cheap either...well made and fairly expensive.
dahermit is offline  
Old April 8, 2021, 06:31 PM   #22
FunGramps
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2018
Location: Leftern Washington
Posts: 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruger4Life View Post
Well, thanks for trying to shoot me down on every point! No worries! Some single-shot owners agree. Fans of other types of rifles generally do not. I am US Army retired, and small arms repair (up to howitzers) were my job/specialty. I know ALL types of firearms, and how they function (including fully automatic), and have inspected/cleaned/repaired/fired thousands of them. Perhaps, since I am a fan of the simplicity of single shots, and also a student of firearms history, I should have clarified my background. I’ve trained many soldiers on the shooting range as well. Your typical average joe, when learning how to shoot, will always exercise better shooting technique shooting single-shot, when they know they will not have follow-up shots. Hand a newbie 10, 20, or 30 round mags, and they become sloppy. Hell, most of the natives I trained in Afghanistan were better marksmen with their AK’s than our soldiers were with M4’s! Why? Ammunition was a precious commodity, and they never knew when they could get more; thus, every shot must count! Mind you, I’m not shooting you down. I love the challenge of going to the woods with a single-shot BP rifle. Maybe I should have put that in the OP!
I'm with you 100% on the premise that a single shot will push the shooter be a better marksman, that is, if the shooter seeks to be a better shooter in the first place.
And that goes for a single shot shotgun as well. My first shotgun was a H&R single shot break open .12 gauge. I wanted to bring down ducks at 13 years old. I didn't have decoys, and would jump-shoot them. Had to make that one shot count. Yes, it made me practice my marksmanship until I could bring Daffy home for dinner, and it worked. I'd love to have a well made bolt action single shot in .22 LR, a vintage one in great condition. Which would you recommend?
__________________
Finding a wise liberal is as easy as inventing perpetual motion.
FunGramps is offline  
Old April 9, 2021, 02:46 AM   #23
Pathfinder45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 7, 2008
Posts: 3,018
It's true that a person, "could", learn to become just as a good of a marksman with a 30-round semi-auto as with a single-shot rifle. But from what I've seen, they will probably get a lot more enjoyment out of a mag-dump than making each individual shot count. You personally might have more self-control than that....or not. A single shot rifle cannot make you a good shot, but it will promote it. The semi-auto cannot prevent you from becoming a good shoot. But it will not tend to promote making every shot count to the same degree as a single shot.

Quote:
5.) Single shots push shooters to exercise proper shooting skills; breathing control, target/sight acquisition, and trigger control!
Why argue with a statement that's inherently true? Even if it's arguably not always absolute, it is certainly a factoid. But, if you are a lawyer, then you have a license to argue with a buzz-saw, as my Mother would say....

Disclaimer: I have never actually owned a single-shot rifle, but I was somewhat formally trained with one. I still value that training today. That's why I still insist on a, "military", pattern sling on my rifle.

The single-shot rifle is certainly inferior for providing, "Covering fire!", as demonstrated in the film Saving Private Ryan. But as a hunting rifle it is entirely adequate for the task. A Browning B-78 leaves nothing to be desired but the funds to acquire it. My brother accomplishes accurate repeating fire with his as fast as I can keep up with using a bolt action repeater.
Pathfinder45 is offline  
Old April 9, 2021, 09:56 AM   #24
hammie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 18, 2009
Location: Temple, TX
Posts: 789
@fungramps: If you're looking for a vintage .22 rf single shot, I would suggest a remington 514, if you can find one. The older remingtons seemed to be more affordable than winchesters, unless that has changed. I've been looking for a mossberg chuckster, and the one or two local mossbergs were offered at what I thought were ridiculous prices. Who would have thought that mossbergs were starting to command collector's prices?

Sometimes on the older remington .22's, you will get light strikes. Replacing the striker spring in the bolt is an easy fix.
hammie is offline  
Old April 9, 2021, 02:59 PM   #25
dgludwig
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 12, 2005
Location: North central Ohio
Posts: 7,316
Quote:
@fungramps: If you're looking for a vintage .22 rf single shot, I would suggest a remington 514, if you can find one.
Or a Winchester Model 67-if you can find one. I always spot a couple or two at most of the gun shows I attend.
__________________
ONLY AN ARMED PEOPLE CAN BE TRULY FREE ; ONLY AN UNARMED PEOPLE CAN EVER BE ENSLAVED
...Aristotle
NRA Benefactor Life Member
dgludwig is offline  
Reply

Tags
cva , single shot

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2020 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Page generated in 0.11407 seconds with 11 queries