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Old March 30, 2019, 03:02 PM   #1
Nube
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Grains to grams

The grains to grams charts that I have found are saying that there are a lot of grains in one gram. I am just a noobe so I just need some reassurance that this is right that one gram equals approximately 15.5 grains.
Thanks for the replies
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Old March 30, 2019, 03:19 PM   #2
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There are exactly 7000 grains per pound.

There are (approximately) 2.2046285721252 pounds per kilogram.

There are exactly 1000 grams per kilogram.

Therefore, there are (approximately) 15.4324000049 grains per gram.
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Old March 30, 2019, 03:20 PM   #3
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Just google "grains to grams" and a simple fill in chart comes up. Enter the number and it will convert it for you. I've never seen reloading use grams for either bullets or powder, so I don't know why you're asking about it to begin with.
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Old March 30, 2019, 03:32 PM   #4
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I am in the process of getting ready to reload and just doing some research on different scales and their calibration
Thanks
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Old March 30, 2019, 04:10 PM   #5
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Good luck to you. There's a lot to learn. Just a bit of friendly advice: double check a lot of what you hear on the internet to make sure it's fact...just to be safe. Get yourself a good reloading manual or two. I'd recommend at least the Lyman 50th Edition and then the Hornday book. Good luck and do it safely.
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Old March 30, 2019, 05:17 PM   #6
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Grams to Grains:
1.0 gram = 15.4324 grains (close enough)
1.0 grain = 0.0647989 gram (close enough)

Powder charge weights (US system of measure) are normally expressed in grains. One US pound of powder is, as mentioned, just about 7,000 grains of powder.

The only way to know if a scale is telling the truth is to actually weigh a known weight like a good quality test weight and it is best to check the scale at several cardinal points including your desired weigh give or take a little.

Ron
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Old March 30, 2019, 06:14 PM   #7
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Our system of grain weight for bullets and powder uses the Avoirdupois system, one of the old English systems for measuring powders and small amounts of material.
There are 437.5 grains to the ounce, and 7000 grains to the pound.

DO NOT confuse the kernals/flakes of powder (which are called grains. like grains of sand) with the "grain weight".

Metric system uses grams, and the conversion is simple math.
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Old March 30, 2019, 06:44 PM   #8
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Quote:
I am in the process of getting ready to reload and just doing some research on different scales and their calibration
For a new reloader I suggest that you get a scale that reads in grains; the possibility of an error converting grains to grams isn't something you want to happen in your early reloading career!
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Old March 30, 2019, 06:52 PM   #9
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Quote:
I am in the process of getting ready to reload and just doing some research on different scales and their calibration
Although there were some scales being calibrated in grams some years ago coinciding with the government's initiative to switch to metric, it was soon abandoned by handloaders and those scales faded from the handloading scene.

The government initiative did result in medical (and a few other areas) related data being expressed in grams (milligrams), but handloaders evidently were more resistant to change.

None of my current (and not so current) handloading manuals show powder charges in grams...only grains. So it is a no brainer...buy a scale that matches what the load data uses...grains, not grams.
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Old March 30, 2019, 07:31 PM   #10
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Don't buy anything that wasn't designed for reloading, or very small changes in weight.
Some electronic scales on the market don't increment correctly when trickling powder and can create very dangerous situations.

Even then...
I have two "reloading scales" in my possession that cannot be trusted for doing anything related to powder charges, except for spot checking drops from a powder measure.
One, a Cabela's scale, does not increment most changes that are less than 0.2 gr. I can trickle 40 grains of powder into the pan, and have it read 17 gr (or less).
The other, a Hornady scale, losses its zero constantly, and never in a predictable manner. ...And it was the replacement that Hornady sent me for the first one that did the same thing.

They're decent for sorting cases, bullets, etc.; but terrible for working with powder.

I haven't seen anything that beats a good balance beam scale, for under $150.


Quote:
None of my current (and not so current) handloading manuals show powder charges in grams...only grains. So it is a no brainer...buy a scale that matches what the load data uses...grains, not grams.
My Vihtavuori manual does.


...But also has grain equivalents in the load data arrays.
Such as: 2,71 [g], 41.8 [gr]
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Old March 30, 2019, 08:38 PM   #11
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I found a set of weights in grams that I can use for just calibration and just checking to see if the internet was right this time. It just seems like a lot of grains per gram.
Thanks for the replies
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Old March 30, 2019, 09:20 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dahermit View Post
Although there were some scales being calibrated in grams some years ago coinciding with the government's initiative to switch to metric, it was soon abandoned by handloaders and those scales faded from the handloading scene.

The government initiative did result in medical (and a few other areas) related data being expressed in grams (milligrams), but handloaders evidently were more resistant to change.

None of my current (and not so current) handloading manuals show powder charges in grams...only grains. So it is a no brainer...buy a scale that matches what the load data uses...grains, not grams.
I think you may be mistaken. Both my Dillon and Hornady scales calibrate in grams and they're both pretty new.
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Old March 30, 2019, 09:32 PM   #13
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Hornady and Dillion use Grains

Any good digital scale should include a Tare (zero to your empty container) and be switchable between grains, grams, ounces, etc.
Just because a digital scale is switchable does NOT mean you can or should ever use Grams.
But for weighing powder charges, I recommend a quality, reloading specific, beam scale. I just bought a Redding, for just a little more than Lyman. $90 at Midsouth Shooters Supply.
In 30+ years of reloading I have never used anything other than the grains systems. If you want to convert values: https://www.metric-conversions.org/w...s-to-grams.htm
As George W. Bush once uttered: "I sometimes use the Google."

Hornady uses Grains:
Quote:
Lock-N-Load Beam Scale
by HORNADY RELOADING TOOLS
Handloaders who prefer a traditional analog scale for powder measurement will love the Hornady® Lock-N-Load® Beam Scale. This high tolerance scale is consistent to within 1/10th of a grain. The scale can be precisely adjusted to balance the powder pan, and measurements are easy to read on the laser etched beam. Made in the U.S.A.
Dillion uses Grains:
Quote:
The Dillon Precision Eliminator Scale is accurate, reliable and easy to use. With a magnetically dampened 511 grain capacity accurate to within +/- 0.1 grain the Eliminator will help you zero in on the perfect powder charge every time. The Eliminator has three poises:
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Last edited by Marco Califo; March 30, 2019 at 10:59 PM. Reason: Doh!
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Old March 30, 2019, 10:33 PM   #14
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Quote:
I found a set of weights in grams that I can use for just calibration and just checking to see if the internet was right this time. It just seems like a lot of grains per gram.
Thanks for the replies
That is simply just how it is and the numbers don't lie. There are 15.4324 grains in a gram.

Ron
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Old March 30, 2019, 10:56 PM   #15
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Quote:
weights in grams that I can use for just calibration
You can cross gram calibration weights off your list of things to buy. I would also skip an electronic scale (they need to be calibrated, and can still go wrong, drift, etc.). Digital does not mean better.
Good scales do not need to be calibrated.
It is much more important to be able to competently measure in grains period.
https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.c...r-powder-scale
Rather than flopping around trying to figure out what you need, there are kits available that include what you need. Reddings single stage kit is cheaper than Lyman's. Neither includes gram calibration weights.
https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.c...-stage-pro-pak
The one thing even more important: Reloading Manuals! That should be your first purchase and read it all before you buy anything else. It has all been done before. Use that knowledge.
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Old March 31, 2019, 11:14 AM   #16
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And most scale go to 1/10 (grain) so all those other number don't mean anything.

More better to shift it to grains so you are cross references and I see a lot of test weight in grams and some scales calibrate there.
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Old March 31, 2019, 11:16 AM   #17
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and it is best to check the scale at several cardinal points including your desired weigh give or take a little.
As a former surveyor I have to take exception to that statement. Cardinal refers to compass points (North, South, East, West and you can box the compass with finer breakdown) , not calibration points on a scale (sigh)
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Old March 31, 2019, 12:36 PM   #18
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Go here. Click on 'Weight' then 'More Units' then 'Grains'.
https://www.metric-conversions.org/c...alculators.htm
It's really best to forget metrics and just use grains. No North American loading manual is calibrated in metric. Including CC's that are a unit of liquid volume not mass.
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Old March 31, 2019, 12:40 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by RC20 View Post
As a former surveyor I have to take exception to that statement. Cardinal refers to compass points (North, South, East, West and you can box the compass with finer breakdown) , not calibration points on a scale (sigh)
+1
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Old March 31, 2019, 03:06 PM   #20
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Quote:
Quote:
CC's that are a unit of liquid volume not mass.
FALSE: Cubic Centimeters is a measure of volume (period). It does not need to be liquid, solid, or gas. Powder measures dispense by volume. If they are consistent you can get consistent weights.
Mass is not a unit of measure. Catholics go to Mass on Sundays.
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Old April 1, 2019, 09:37 AM   #21
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As a former surveyor I have to take exception to that statement. Cardinal refers to compass points (North, South, East, West and you can box the compass with finer breakdown) , not calibration points on a scale (sigh)
As a former Metrologist in the field of Metrology we refered to the calibration points as cardinal points (sigh).

Just as an example:
"For the purposes of Pressure Gauge Calibration, Cardinal Point Calibration is one where a specific value is set on either the test or the reference instruments. Nominal Point Calibration is one where a value is set near the target value".

Yes, I also agree that in surveying the Cardinal Points are points on a compass, for example 8 Cardinal points could be N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W and NW. So calibrating a compass at 8 cardinal points the above points would work. My guess here is the term can be applied for more than one meaning.

Maybe I just should have said check the scale using reliable check weights?

Ron
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Old April 1, 2019, 09:46 AM   #22
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Always calibrate your scale with the cardinal points.



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Old April 1, 2019, 09:57 AM   #23
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There was a post here several years ago where a guy had one of those cheap multi-unit digital scales. He got it set to some other unit than grains, grossly overloaded his ammo, and wrecked the gun.

There are measurements that USED to be in grams.
A 125 gr 9mm bullet is the result of converting 8 grams to grains, then rounding up to a multiple of five that we Anglophones are comfortable with.
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Old April 1, 2019, 03:48 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Nube View Post
The grains to grams charts that I have found are saying that there are a lot of grains in one gram. I am just a noobe so I just need some reassurance that this is right that one gram equals approximately 15.5 grains.
Thanks for the replies
If you are using a gram scale to measure powder... DON'T !
Sooner or later a conversion will sneak up and bite you on the butte .
Measuring powder is the most important thing to get right...throw in converting grams to grains/ grains to grams and it is way too easy to make a mistake.

Buy a proper powder scale that measures in GRAINS ...it will be worth every penny...trust me on this .
Gary

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Old April 1, 2019, 05:14 PM   #25
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FWIW, My $36 Frankford Arsenal scale is still going strong after 6 years and my $24 Smart Weigh Gem Tech20 is still going strong after 2 years.

IMO digital scales are much easier to use than any of the manual ones and even the cheap ones designed for reloading are sufficient for measuring with any normal reloading setup. And anyone who thinks beam scales are foolproof is only fooling themselves.
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