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Old December 17, 2009, 06:38 PM   #1
Paramount
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Foolish mistake

Im new to reloading and new to this forum. I have made a foolinh and very careless mistake. My question is what will be the outcome if I shoot the following rounds.

I am using the Speer manual loading 30 06 for my savage 110 or 1903 springfield. I am using new cases, 150 grain hornady boat tail, and IMR 4895 powder. The book says that I should use 45.5 grains and that is what I intended to use.

What I did was use the load data for H4895 which states 42 grains. Unfortunately I loaded 42 grains of powder instead of 45.5 Both of these are the min for the powder.

What will happen if I use these rounds, also are they safe in a garand.

Thanks in advance.
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Old December 17, 2009, 06:54 PM   #2
JD 500
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I just looked up 30 06 with a 150 gr bullet here :

http://www.imrpowder.com/

and this data suggests a minimum of 49.0 grains, and a max of 53.0 grains when using IMR 4895. I don't EVER experiment beyond what my manual says.
(Even to the low side)

I wouldn't personally shoot them.
I do know some powders are dangerous loaded too light, I do not know if IMR 4895 is one of those.

Let's see what others more knowledgeable than I think about it.
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Old December 17, 2009, 06:58 PM   #3
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I light loaded for my '03 so my wife could handle it.

mine was below the min. with 4895
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Old December 17, 2009, 07:01 PM   #4
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The problem I see is, even if you can use them, why would you? You're on the low side power wise, questionable function in your garand (so those usually like lighter loads) and by the time you found your new POI you're making the next batch.
Since you know what powder is in it, you can reuse all the components. Pull the bullets, collect the powder, resize the brass without primer pin, and redo the loads.
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Old December 17, 2009, 08:39 PM   #5
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It has been my experience that IMR4895 is highly tolerant of light loads. My current plinker 30-06 load is less than 45gr with a 125gr bullet and they work quite well (low SD, good accuracy).

I'd not worry about it one bit, and just shoot them. I have found that light loads or experimental loads are really good for offhand practice (where shooter-induced POI variances are going to be far greater than any POI variances in the ammo anyway).....
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Old December 17, 2009, 08:53 PM   #6
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pull them and load em again if you dont feel ok withem
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Old December 17, 2009, 09:19 PM   #7
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Hopefully you have learned a valuable lesson here. I work a lot more than I shoot so I will use a work analogy rather than shooting. The work I do has to be RIGHT. Not close. I make my share of mistakes but they rarely get by me as I check and check and check again. Back to shooting. When I make a load, I look up a load. Look it up in another manual. Maybe a third. Check the powder, make sure it is right. Set the scale to five times the desired load. Drop five charges, weigh, adjust......until the measure is set. Then weigh one charge. Then go back to the manuals. Check the loads and the powder. Make sure I'm in the right section in the manual. Sounds like a lot of time but it is not really, not nearly as much trouble as your agonizing over your mistake. A lot less trouble than disassembling a bunch of ammo. A whole lot less trouble than damaging a gun. In a nutshell, check everything. Then check again.
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Old December 17, 2009, 10:22 PM   #8
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I'd pull them and re-charge with the correct minimum load. How many rounds are we talking about anyway? For load development I rarely put together more than 10 for testing at any charge weight.
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Old December 17, 2009, 10:35 PM   #9
Shoney
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Paramount

WELCOME TO TFL!!!

How many cartridges did you load at 42 grains?

If you only loaded a few, us them as fouling shots or for plinking. Either IMR or H 4895 are used for reduced loads. Your loads will be very mild, but a crap shoot as to the accuracy.

Generally, to determine the most accurate load, you load 5 cartridges in the starting powder weight, and progressively increase the powder charge in the next 5 more cartridges by 0.50 to 1.0 grains, and continue in 5 cartridge groups until you arrive at the max load.

Dan Newberry's site has a good explanation of an alternate method to work up loads.
http://optimalchargeweight.embarqspa...ons/4529817134

Good Shooting!
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Old December 18, 2009, 04:44 AM   #10
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Quote:
It has been my experience that IMR4895 is highly tolerant of light loads
My experience has been the same. (H4895 and IMR 4895 have done quite well for me, in light loads.)
...Just don't use them in a rimfire. They don't ignite with rimfire priming compounds...


As far as usability goes - I would pull the bullets, and recharge with the proper powder. With a Garand, you're not likely to see anything good. (As far as accuracy and operation.) Why waste the components?
It shouldn't hurt anything, but it's a waste of money.
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Old December 18, 2009, 10:04 AM   #11
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They probably would be ok for the bolt actions, but may be light for the Garand. The question is do you want to waste the powder, primers, and bullets playing around with them? Personally I'd pull them and reload them to the load you want.
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Old December 18, 2009, 11:02 AM   #12
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Well don’t freak. For years I shot, in a bolt rifle, for standing and sitting, a 168 grain bullet with 42.0 grains IMR 4895 in the 30-06. This load shot well enough to clean the 200 yard ten ring.

I tested with cheap 174 FMJ’s, just to see what velocity I was getting.
H4895 and IMR 4895 are not the same powder, but they are close enough that it is not worth losing sleep over.

I have no doubt that 42.0 grs with a 150 will not cause the end of the world.

Probably won’t shoot worth a flip in a Garand. My recollection I shot my light load in a match garand and it did not group well. Gas guns are much more sensitive to ammunition, and you will find that service rifles do not like ammunition that are too far away from their issue ammunition parameters. .


M98 26" 1-10 Wilson Barrel


175 FMJBT 42.0 grs IMR 4895 wtd WLR 190 ≤ WWII ≤ 195grs OAL 3.30"
17 Sept 00 T=72°F

Ave Vel = 2451
Std Dev = 15
ES = 51
Low = 2429
High = 2480
N = 9
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Old December 18, 2009, 07:16 PM   #13
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Quote:
Gas guns are much more sensitive to ammunition, and you will find that service rifles do not like ammunition that are too far away from their issue ammunition parameters.
Indeed. That is the very reason some reloading manuals have multiple listings for 06. There are often sections devoted solely to gas guns. Such as:
".30-06 Service Rifle"
"M1 Garand .30-06"
".30-06 M1 Garand"


Similar 'gas gun' sections can often be found for .308 Win and .223 Rem/5.56x45.
If you have a rifle that would prefer the 'service rifle' loads, it's a good idea to use that data; not the standard data.

Then... There are reloading manuals and loadbooks specifically for common types of weapons (ARs, FALs, Galils, M1 Garand, M1 Carbine, etc..).
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