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Old December 11, 2012, 02:29 PM   #26
BarryLee
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I suspect a lot of these errors get added in by the sound editing crew after the fact. I’m not sure why a Director or Technical Advisor would not catch it, but maybe it’s just too far into the process to make a change.
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Old December 11, 2012, 03:24 PM   #27
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"I suspect a lot of these errors get added in by the sound editing crew after the fact. I’m not sure why a Director or Technical Advisor would not catch it, but maybe it’s just too far into the process to make a change."

In response:

"Who permitted them to do it? No particular man among the dozens in authority. No one cared to permit it or to stop it. No one was responsible. No one can be held to account. Such is the nature of all collective action."
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Old December 11, 2012, 04:28 PM   #28
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How many productions do you think have technical advisors?
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Old December 11, 2012, 07:28 PM   #29
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How many productions do you think have technical advisors?
Well, I have no real idea, but don’t most studios have specific people to handle the various prop guns? I mean they don’t just go down to the local gun shop pick up a new handgun and a box of blanks. There has to be someone that knows at least a little bit about firearms. The problem is many of the sound effects are inserted later by an entirely different team, so it would seem that is where the problem occurs.
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Old December 12, 2012, 07:56 AM   #30
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My son works in the motion picture industry. There are a few companies that rent out guns and equipment to the movie business. Only the very largest studios have much in the way of their own props anymore. But being qualified to tell people how to handle small arms is not quite a technical advisor.

Many films do have technical advisors, of course, but I suspect that the advice given is of an overall nature--and sometimes ignored. Gun handling is probably a small detail in a film, though I'd have to say it was often featured in the Westerns of the 1950s and some of the TV Westerns of that period. I believe actors sometimes received fast draw instruction, because that was sort of the thing at that time, but I wouldn't go so far as to claim it was historically accurate.

The movie "He walked by night," from 1948, was about the police trying to track down a killer in Los Angeles. There was a technical advisor on the set named Marty Wynn, who was or had been an LA police detective. One of the actors in the movie was Jack Webb, who in addition to being married to Julie London, went on to bigger things in television. Wynn supposedly suggested to Webb that a TV show based on real life stories from the police department (only changing the names to protect the innocent!) and that's where the idea for Dragnet came from.

I don't suppose too many war movies had technical advisors who were privates or riflemen during the war.
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Old December 13, 2012, 12:40 PM   #31
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Didn't Kojak carry a pair of snub 38's? one in each pocket as I remember.
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Old December 14, 2012, 07:15 PM   #32
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Kojak carried a (one) S&W model 49 bodyguard. Always pulled it from his overcoat pocket. I never saw him wear a holster in any episode. Stavros carried an M&P 2", Crocker carried a Chief special.
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Old October 24, 2018, 03:13 PM   #33
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Bump from way back I know but really the question is the same

Watched second episode of The Rookie because Hey I like Nathan fillion

A perp uses a sbs,we even clearly see him load it, and yet you get to hear him pump it ROFL,

It is like they dont proofwatch it!
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Old October 24, 2018, 07:29 PM   #34
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Nobody mentioned how the bad guy always turns his gun sideways to aim it
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Old October 24, 2018, 07:51 PM   #35
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In having the right licenses (Canada don't you know) even though my full-time profession was as a Firearms Instructor, had me delivering the odd weapon to movie sets.

One was a lever action rifle, Cowboy Movie. Not to be fired, just held, then slipped into a scabbard, on a horse. No problem. Done headed home.

I observed another scene. Tough looking bad guy, menace some people in a saloon, weapon, 45 single action revolver. Hammer down!
At 6 am I had a call come back! The actor was refusing to change that take? He liked the way he looked in it! He was English, as I am. I showed him the hammer back, hammer down... Would not go off, with hammer down.

He redid the scene. Worth a few dollars for yours truly.
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Old October 25, 2018, 10:26 AM   #36
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Cuz it’s in the script...how come they haven’t run outta ammo in WD after 9 seasons?
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Old November 3, 2018, 11:51 PM   #37
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Two circumstances which puzzle me...

Actually, the first circumstance amazes me more than puzzles me. In the TV series 'Cannon' starring the late William Conrad, the character Frank Cannon could shoot a two inch Chief Special revolver better than I could a rifle. I've come to attribute that to a good script writer. Never have found one, still looking.

The puzzling circumstance is this. In the first five or so minutes off a movie, the protagonist cannot place a bullet on the villain - or the inside of a closed structure - for neither love nor money. In the final scene or two, the protagonist can hit a running evil-doer at 300 yards or meters (depending on location) shooting with the 'weak' hand with a pistol made of plastic scraps, a discarded section of galvanized pipe and peanut butter. After being wounded with a Medieval Morning Star.

Wow! Just wow!
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Old November 4, 2018, 05:21 AM   #38
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For me it is not just the weapons, it is the procedures, the nomenclature, the names, etc.

From the uncocked single action that they manage to shoot with a trigger pull to the change in handgun from one scene to another, to how a procedure is performed, and one that always irked me (but appears to be less used) is when they call a CIA officer an "agent."

But as I get older I get more mellow and understand it is hollyweed getting it wrong as they usually do.
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Old November 4, 2018, 07:18 AM   #39
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I liked how officer Riggs made the smiley face with his Beretta.
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Old November 4, 2018, 09:53 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brit
I observed another scene. Tough looking bad guy, menace some people in a saloon, weapon, 45 single action revolver. Hammer down!
At 6 am I had a call come back! The actor was refusing to change that take? He liked the way he looked in it! He was English, as I am. I showed him the hammer back, hammer down... Would not go off, with hammer down.
Most of the original Lone Ranger episodes are now available on Youtube. I've watched miost of them, and I was astonished to see that -- most times -- when the Lone Ranger draws and holds a bad guy at gun point, not only is the hammer not cocked, he holds the gun with the web of his hand high up behind the hammer so he's not even set up TO cock it.

But when I was six years old I didn't notice such things.
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Old November 4, 2018, 11:18 AM   #41
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Most movies are, to me, just entertainment but once in a while, I notice the things that aren't right. Guns, especially. All of the above, of course. One of the worst ones was in a movie where they were shooting a full-auto, large caliber military weapon but NO brass was falling to the ground around their feet.

Oops.

In another, they showed the brass falling to the ground in slow motion but it was obviously brass blanks that still had the crimps on the mouths of the casings.

Probably one of the worst was recently, I was watching a T.V. show where there were eight or eight hundred bad guys shooting at two cops. The two cops were running down a fairly narrow hallway in order to jump out the window at the other end. The bad guys were laying down a ton of fire and

1. Not shooting each other in the backs of the heads
2. Not hitting the two cops

Made me laugh.

Even the most serious movie will elicit a chuckle when they make these kinds of mistakes. I'm sure I don't even catch all the errors, either.

--Wag--
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Old November 5, 2018, 06:49 AM   #42
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Some guys are trained and prepare for some of those action movies. Check it out.
http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnB07wnDJL8
What bothers me is when they think they are that action figure they portray. Now that's scary.
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Old November 6, 2018, 07:04 PM   #43
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I cringe when a guy swings open the cylinder on a revolver to check if it is loaded and then quickly flips his hand slamming the cylinder back into place.

Mel Gibson is real bad about it but other actors do it also, they blink every time they pull the trigger.

The bad guy using a full auto submachine gun shoots 10 rounds or more at the good guy missing him but the good guy shoots the bad guy with a pistol at distances way beyond where good marksmen are capable of getting a hit.
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Old November 6, 2018, 07:22 PM   #44
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I see most ARs are firing like crazy with the dust cover still closed.
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Old November 8, 2018, 04:52 PM   #45
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I saw a movie scene the other day where a gangsta girl held a pistol to a guy's head, and she had two fingers on the trigger! Index and middle fingers both inside the trigger guard. Yeah, she was skinny.

Unbelievable!
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Old November 9, 2018, 01:23 AM   #46
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Quote:
at distances way beyond where good marksmen are capable of getting a hit.
There is no distance beyond where a GOOD marksman is capable of getting a hit.

if you can see it, you can hit it. If you can't, then you just aren't a good (enough) marksman.

Good guys make impossible shots the same way Superheroes do super things, its in the script!

Quote:
I liked how officer Riggs made the smiley face with his Beretta.
I liked that, too, until I noticed that the "holes" that make the face don't go through the paper...
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Old November 9, 2018, 07:15 AM   #47
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I liked how officer Riggs Head Butted some mutt in one of the Police movies. Good snap from the neck. That strike in Liverpool is called a Liverpool kiss! in Glasgow, a Glasgow Handshake. A broken nose is a normal result.

One way to give power to the hit, grab the jacket, by the lapels. Till fish hooks were placed in the lapels! End of that game.

After the second World War, razors were leaving shocking disfiguring facial wounds.

A Judge (I think in Glasgow) said next conviction, he would give Life, with hard labour!
All the hard men laughed! Till he did. Razors were turning up everywhere, dumped.
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