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Old December 5, 2018, 02:23 PM   #1
robvasi
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modern caliber

I am interesting in getting a revolver that resembles an old-west revolver. Suggestions on brands, or is this a matter of what appeals to me? Is there a brand that I should avoid?

Since I plan to shoot the gun I buy, I would like to know if the replica guns can shoot modern rounds. If the gun is chambered for .357 will any .357 fit and fire?

vasi
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Old December 5, 2018, 02:30 PM   #2
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Here is a link to some of the older replicas you may like. I choose this link because this store is about an hours drive from my house. Cimmaron, Uberti, and Ruger vacquero and Bisleys could suit your needs. Like you I have plans for one of this guns in .357 caliber as I already reload and certain models can be ordered for .357. Now this guns are all single action.
https://www.texasjacks.com/guns-n-st...ml?caliber=209
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Old December 5, 2018, 02:40 PM   #3
robvasi
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Thank you for your reply.

So, if the description states that the revolver is chambered for .357, can it shoot any .357 round?
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Old December 5, 2018, 02:44 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robvasi View Post
Thank you for your reply.

So, if the description states that the revolver is chambered for .357, can it shoot any .357 round?
It will work with just about any .357 Magnum load within SAAMI specs.....Ruger-only loads are a no-go. It won't work with .357SIG.

Another option is a SA revolver in .45ACP. All the fun of .45 Colt ammo at half the price.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
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Old December 5, 2018, 03:08 PM   #5
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I'd buy something that will last. Not correct (transfer bar), but Rugers are tough.
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Old December 5, 2018, 04:04 PM   #6
Jim Watson
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Yes, a .357 Magnum single action will fire all usual .357 Magnum ammunition.
Also any .38 Special, including .38 Special +P and +P+.
Also .38 Short Colt and .38 Long Colt, although those are not common enough to be listed in the catalog like they used to be.
But NOT .38 S&W, which is from a different family tree.

I recommend the Ruger. It is very strong and durable and the transfer bar action lets you load all six chambers safely; unlike the Colt and its Italian replicas which should have an empty chamber under the hammer when at rest or holstered.
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Old December 5, 2018, 04:59 PM   #7
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You have your answers.
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Old December 5, 2018, 10:03 PM   #8
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Howdy

The 357 Magnum cartridge was developed by Smith and Wesson in 1935.

Shortly afterward, Colt chambered the Single Action Army for 357 Mag.

Although not as large as a similarly chambered Ruger Blackhawk, any replica of the Single Action Army is still a large revolver, with lots of steel around the chambers of the cylinder.

The cylinders in this photo, left to right, are Colt Single Action Army chambered for 45 Colt, Ruger New Vaquero chambered for 357 Magnum, and Uberti Cimarron Cattleman chambered for 45 Colt.

With modern steel there is plenty of meat surrounding the chambers of a single action revolver of this size to safely shoot SAAMI max pressure 357 Magnum ammunition.






But watch out, the recoil may surprise you.
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Old December 6, 2018, 12:12 AM   #9
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Get a Colt and get this -CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED- over with.
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Old December 6, 2018, 07:54 PM   #10
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Wellcome to the Form Vasi

Clone's galore can be had. Buy the real Mc Coy. >Colt 1873 Peacemaker.

As some other wiser than I quipped: _" Buy once. Cry once. Thereafter Happiness in it's shooting.
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Old December 7, 2018, 06:44 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ms6852 View Post
You have your answers.

Yes indeed. "Thank you!" to everyone. This is the benefit of a forum. A novice can get reliable replies.
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Old December 7, 2018, 06:53 AM   #12
robvasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Driftwood Johnson View Post
Howdy

The 357 Magnum cartridge was developed by Smith and Wesson in 1935.

Shortly afterward, Colt chambered the Single Action Army for 357 Mag.

Although not as large as a similarly chambered Ruger Blackhawk, any replica of the Single Action Army is still a large revolver, with lots of steel around the chambers of the cylinder.

The cylinders in this photo, left to right, are Colt Single Action Army chambered for 45 Colt, Ruger New Vaquero chambered for 357 Magnum, and Uberti Cimarron Cattleman chambered for 45 Colt.

With modern steel there is plenty of meat surrounding the chambers of a single action revolver of this size to safely shoot SAAMI max pressure 357 Magnum ammunition.


But watch out, the recoil may surprise you.
Thank your for the detailed description and photos of the chambers. I asked this question in a gun shop and the salesman didn't give me a clear answer. He told me what the cowboy shooters use, and then admitted he was not a 'revolver guy.'

I fired a Ruger, and a Smith and Wesson, and then fired an replica revolver. Indeed, there was more recoil from the replica. Old west cowboys had stronger hands, or so it seems.
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Old December 7, 2018, 08:18 AM   #13
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Yeah, makes sense, if I want a gun that looks like a Colt, the only way to do that is to buy a Colt.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rambo60+ View Post
Get a Colt and get this -CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED- over with.
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Old December 7, 2018, 08:21 AM   #14
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They are pricey aren't they?

When did Colt stop making the Peacemaker?





Quote:
Originally Posted by Sure Shot Mc Gee View Post
Wellcome to the Form Vasi

Clone's galore can be had. Buy the real Mc Coy. >Colt 1873 Peacemaker.

As some other wiser than I quipped: _" Buy once. Cry once. Thereafter Happiness in it's shooting.
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Old December 7, 2018, 08:34 AM   #15
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Here is one I am considering:

COLT SAA 5 1/2" 45 B+ Engraved

What does the B+ infer?

Factory New Condition

$4,650

I realize that guns are not investments. Even so, will a gun like this decrease in value or increase? My guess is that it will increase in value, albeit, not as much as equity.
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Old December 7, 2018, 10:37 AM   #16
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B+ is the engraving coverage. In Colt parlance A is the least, D is full coverage. (S&W is the other way 'round.)
B+ implies greater coverage than regular B but not as much as C.

The big question is whether it is FACTORY engraving and whether it is standard, expert, or master (signed) quality.
Aftermarket engraving can be of high quality and very attractive but does not give nearly as much added value as factory engraving.

A lot of people are reluctant to shoot engraved guns (except shotguns) for fear of putting wear on the embellishments. I'm not, but my only engraved revolver was done aftermarket and didn't cost $4000+, either.

So you really need to think about your actual needs and interests before you splurge on an engraved gun at triple the base gun's price.
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Old December 7, 2018, 11:08 AM   #17
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They are pricey aren't they?

When did Colt stop making the Peacemaker?
Technically, Colt has not stopped making the Single Action Army.

But Colt has been plagued with bad management decisions for years, and one of those decisions was to drastically cut back on how many assemblers were working in the Custom Shop to assemble Peacemakers. So the last I heard is that the backlog is so long that Colt has stopped taking orders for Peacemakers until the backlog is significantly reduced.

Why do they cost so much compared to the imports?

Probably licensing costs, labor costs, bad management, and who knows what else.

Just so you know, there is a new player in town. Standard Manufacturing recently began selling an American made copy of the Colt Single Action Revolver. And they are just as expensive as Colts.

http://www.stdgun.com/sa-revolver-1/



Quote:
Old west cowboys had stronger hands, or so it seems.
As I said, the 357 Magnum was invented in 1935. Most Old West Cowboys (1873 until about 1900) would have been firing one of the old Black Powder cartridges, such as 45 Colt, 44-40, 38-40, or a few others. I fire Black Powder 45 Colt cartridges in my Colts all the time. The recoil is nothing like a 357 Mag. 357 Magnum recoil is a quick, sharp whack to the hand. Black Powder 45 Colt recoil is stout. It will raise the muzzle up quite a lot in recoil. But if you allow the grip to rotate in your hand during recoil, it is not punishing. At least I don't think so.

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Old December 7, 2018, 11:10 AM   #18
robvasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Watson View Post
B+ is the engraving coverage. In Colt parlance A is the least, D is full coverage. (S&W is the other way 'round.)
B+ implies greater coverage than regular B but not as much as C.

The big question is whether it is FACTORY engraving and whether it is standard, expert, or master (signed) quality.
Aftermarket engraving can be of high quality and very attractive but does not give nearly as much added value as factory engraving.

A lot of people are reluctant to shoot engraved guns (except shotguns) for fear of putting wear on the embellishments. I'm not, but my only engraved revolver was done aftermarket and didn't cost $4000+, either.

So you really need to think about your actual needs and interests before you splurge on an engraved gun at triple the base gun's price.
Thank you for your reply. I will ask if it is factory engraved or not.
I doubt if I would shoot this gun. I would need to know if it damage the finish, and if by shooting it the value would decrease.

My home is outfitted, or as some might say, 'decorated' which is a term I don't use, in reproductions of historical objects; King Tut's dagger, a Greek sword and a Roman sword, and a Renaissance sword and dagger. As for guns, I own one, an 1805 Harper's Ferry Pistol.

When I saw this colt, I thought it would be a nice gun to display. The price is more than I want to pay. I could buy a three guns for the price, but it sure looks good.

If shooting it would not damage it, or diminish it's value, the I would shoot it. if I owned it.

I doubt if I'll buy it. There are other places to spend that money, like a trip to Europe. When I state it like that, it puts it in perspective.

Thank you for your guidance.
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Old December 7, 2018, 11:15 AM   #19
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I realize that guns are not investments. Even so, will a gun like this decrease in value or increase? My guess is that it will increase in value, albeit, not as much as equity.
The investment value of old guns is very unpredictable. Up to the whims of the market place and what anyone is willing to pay at any point in time. Some models will increase in value, some will not. Very generally speaking you will do better to invest in the stock market than to invest in firearms.

I buy lots of old guns. Some are pretty valuable. I do not buy them as investments. I buy them for the pleasure of owning them. Some I shoot, some I do not. When the time comes to liquidate my collection, hopefully they will be worth more than when I bought them. Hopefully.
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Old December 7, 2018, 11:17 AM   #20
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When I saw this colt, I thought it would be a nice gun to display.
I NEVER display guns.

NEVER!

You don't know who might be peeking in the window to see what easy pickings are there.
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Old December 7, 2018, 12:01 PM   #21
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I NEVER display guns.

NEVER!

You don't know who might be peeking in the window to see what easy pickings are there.
This is true. My step daughter got married and moved her husband in. He ruined my wife's car and I got pretty hot about it. While I was at work the next day he ran out on her and took 15 of my handguns with him.
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Old December 7, 2018, 12:39 PM   #22
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Driftwood, Thanks for the info. about the Standard Manufacturing guns.
I wasn't aware that its parent the CT Shotgun Co. had started making so many different models including the single action revolver.
The company is located in my hometown where I currently live.
When I was growing up, I knew the fellow who began the company and was always proud of his accomplishments both for him and for our small city.
The Colt Manufacturing plant is located in the neighboring city of West Hartford, CT.
Another gun manufacturer located in my city is Stag Arms who was a long time supplier of parts for the Colt AR rifles and then they eventually began producing their own AR's including the 1st left handed AR rifle.
The former USFA (U.S. Firearms) operations were located in Hartford in the old original Colt building and I was going to recommend one of those until I saw their prices and also realize that parts can always be an issue.
Not too many years ago I saw a matched pair of used Rodeo .38's for sale at a local gun shop on consignment in the $700-$800 range for the pair and I was going to buy them but someone else bought them 1st.
And now their prices have skyrocketed even though the Rodeo was their bargain model with a rough phosphate type finish.
Some local people used to work for USFA and they made very nice guns and had a fine reputation.
But considering their current outrageous prices, I can't help but feel pride in the Standard Manufacturing guns.
Any idea how well they shoot, function & handle?
Have you heard any feedback about them?

I did find this video and plan to research more about it:

https://www.full30.com/video/2f6c2cf...ca11f680db6d28

Last edited by arcticap; December 7, 2018 at 03:02 PM.
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Old December 7, 2018, 05:59 PM   #23
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If you want a shooter , I bought my only 357 in 1970 , a Ruger Blackhawk .
I shot it a lot then and still shoot it a lot. I have put some stupid hot magnum loads through it back in the day . Nothing has ever broken and I still shoot it regularly.
Might want to check them out if you want to shoot it a lot.

They now have Vaquero's and Bisley's in blue steel and stainless and convertible models.
You can get one revolver and shoot 38 Special, 357 Magnum and with the extra cylinder it will shoot 9mm Luger...all kinds of good stuff available today .
Gary
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Old December 7, 2018, 09:14 PM   #24
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But considering their current outrageous prices, I can't help but feel pride in the Standard Manufacturing guns.
Any idea how well they shoot, function & handle?
Have you heard any feedback about them?
Nope. I have seen the same video that you posted. I have not handled one.

Although one thing I noticed is they have the old style conical firing pin that was the first type of firing pin Colt put in the hammers of the Single Action Army. Apparently the owner insisted on this style of firing pin.

This is a photo of the hardened insert fitted into the frame of a Colt. It prevents the firing pin from raising a burr on the relatively soft steel of the frame as the firing pin zooms through the hole in the frame.






This is an Uberti Cattleman. It does not have a hardened bushing set into the frame. the dings around the hole were put there when I removed the burrs that the firing pin had made as it flashed through the hole.






The Standard revolvers do have a hardened bushing set into the frame, it is a bit different in shape, but it is there for the same purpose. When the hammer falls on a Colt, the firing pin 'finds its way' through the hole. There are geometric reasons for this, but the bottom line is the firing pin is free to wiggle slightly up and down as it 'finds its way' through the hole. As this happens over and over again, the hard firing pin can reform the metal around the hole, resulting in a burr raised around the hole. I once had a used Uberti that had such a bad burr raised around the hole that it was scraping primers under it as they rotated by. Not a good thing. The idea of the hardened bushing in the frame is to prevent this from happening.




This photo is from Eddie Janus' Peacemaker Specialists web page. it shows the old conical style firing pin of the early 1st Gens.








The hammer of this 1st Gen Bisely Colt has the old style conical firing pin.






The firing pin on this 2nd Gen Colt hammer is typical of the later 1st Gen and all 2nd Gen hammers.




The concave shape of the 2nd Gen firing pin results in less contact with the frame than the old conical firing pins. The firing pin is fastened to the hammer by a rivet through its middle, and the rivet allows the firing pin to wiggle slightly up and down as it traverses the hole in the frame. This wiggle is what allows the firing pin to find its way through the frame.

Anyway, I chatted on line not too long ago with a guy who has one of the Standard revolvers. He mentioned that he could see the underside of the firing pin had been filed on to remove some of the metal. He felt this was done because they discovered that the conical firing pin was having an interference problem with the hardened bushing in the frame.

Hand filing each of the firing pins to solve this problem has to be expensive. Maybe they will solve the problem, or maybe they will persuade the owner to go with a concave firing pin.

Last edited by Driftwood Johnson; December 7, 2018 at 09:21 PM.
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Old December 8, 2018, 05:45 PM   #25
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[QUOTE=Jim Watson;6673247]B+ is the engraving coverage. In Colt parlance A is the least, D is full coverage. (S&W is the other way 'round.)
B+ implies greater coverage than regular B but not as much as C.

The big question is whether it is FACTORY engraving and whether it is standard, expert, or master (signed) quality.
Aftermarket engraving can be of high quality and very attractive but does not give nearly as much added value as factory engraving.]

Some research revealed that the revolver in question was manufactured after 1994. The serial number is: S74997A. The seller informed me that the revolver in question was engraved at the factory.

You are right, I need to give this some thought. The engraving is quite nice and enhances the look. However, is it something I want to pay a lot to have.
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