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Old January 17, 2017, 08:11 PM   #51
Mr. Hill
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He makes a good point about the re-crown possibly resulting in a less accurate barrel than what you've got now.

If it shoots sub-moa, I wouldn't mess with it.
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Old January 18, 2017, 09:44 PM   #52
reynolds357
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jhinalabama, yep, you had a problem. Now that Remington "fixed" it, you have a bigger problem. Honestly, I bet if you bore scope the barrel, the whole thing is probably crap. As others have said, try to make Remington fix it right. It is not tool chatter. It looks like a defect in the steel before the rifling was cut. The thought of that is scary.
To all who are saying those are "microscopic defects," you might want to look up the definition of microscopic. I will give you a hint, if you can see it with your naked eye, its not microscopic. The defect is ridiculous and the crown looks like my three year old did it with a drill and a burr.

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Old January 25, 2017, 10:52 PM   #53
TheFriendlyMarksman
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Buying Remington was your first mistake. Trying to repair it would be good money chasing bad. Dump that garbage and get yourself a real gun. Get a real caliber while you're at it. 308 is far too slow.
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Old January 27, 2017, 04:02 AM   #54
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Quote:
To all who are saying those are "microscopic defects," you might want to look up the definition of microscopic. I will give you a hint, if you can see it with your naked eye, its not microscopic. The defect is ridiculous and the crown looks like my three year old did it with a drill and a burr.
I guess you missed the part where he said he couldn't see it until he used a magnifying glass.
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Old January 27, 2017, 10:59 PM   #55
reynolds357
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Nope. The picture posted is not much larger than 1 to 1 magnification. It is plainly visible in the photo. I guarantee you this is visible with the naked eye.
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Old January 28, 2017, 03:55 AM   #56
Snyper
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Quote:
reynolds357:
"I guarantee you this is visible with the naked eye."
This is what he said in Post #10:
Quote:
"I had inspected the rifle for defects and could never find anything wrong with it until I used a magnifying glass."
I'm not sure what picture you see, but on my monitor the bore appears about 5" wide

I'm guessing the worst part of the defect is about 0.060" long

It can be removed but it probably won't make it more accurate, and could make it worse.
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Old January 28, 2017, 03:28 PM   #57
reynolds357
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I am looking at the first picture he posted. I can blow it up huge, but it naturally came up in close to 1 to 1 size. Not microscopic. It is a crappy barrel. Crappy Q.C. let that one out.
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Old January 30, 2017, 11:41 AM   #58
amflyer
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A few things to consider, most of which have been brought up previously:

A barrel is designed to send the bullet on its way. This one does that better than a large percentage of rifles.

A barrel is a consumable part of the rifle. It will wear out.

That feeling of satisfaction is important. I've agonized over very good guns because there were small things that kept them from being "perfect." I understand this.

If you get a new barrel, it probably won't be as accurate. If you leave that mark there, you will know it in the back of your mind.

Solution I would pursue? Leave this barrel in place, have a good gunsmith do a cut and crown, which should not affect the accuracy, and have your peace of mind.

Probably a more logical approach would be to leave it as-is and enjoy the great accuracy, and keep the $100 bucks in your pocket.
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Old January 31, 2017, 03:29 AM   #59
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Buying Remington was your first mistake. Trying to repair it would be good money chasing bad. Dump that garbage and get yourself a real gun. Get a real caliber while you're at it. 308 is far too slow.
I think you need to put 'smilies' after comments like this.
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Old February 1, 2017, 12:46 AM   #60
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A lot of pointless argument going on here.

I'll say again.

I do not think Rem has an accuracy guarantee. In the extreme,like 4 MOA,if it would not shoot,you might claim "defect in material and workmanship"
If it is shooting 1 MOA,you have no accuracy complaint.

But that is not the only parameter of quality that would be covered by "defects in materials and workmanship". A splotch in the bluing on a ne3w gun may not affect accuracy,but its a legit defect the will reduce resale.

I will assume Rem has a drawing for a barrel. The numbers will define a theoretically perfect barrel,and the tolerances will describe a maximum deviation . The bore might be checked with plug gages,or a star guage,or an air guage,or some newfangled electronic indicating guage.

If the tolerance defines the barrel shall be true,by one definition or another,to that theoretically perfect barrel,within xxxxx tolerance. If that defect and hone job takes that portion of the barrel out of spec,its defective if it shoots 0.2 MOA.
Most parts will have some form of surface finish call out.It might be "flame cut" or "saw cut" Often it is an RMS micron callout. Like a 32 fin or a 16 fin.
It gets checked with a profilometer,sort of like a phonograph tone arm and stylus.
I would bet the defect would fail a profilometer test.

Would you want the crankshaft rear main seal surface or a connecting rod journal or a cylinder bore of your new $50,000 pickup to have "A little flaw you could hardly see" We'll stone the high spot off,you go see if it will go 100 mph.What more do you want?

Whatever Remington did,IF that is a flaw from Remington,its substandard crap.
The ONLY right thing to do was rebarrel.Not put a bandaid on it.
That's what you do if you make QUALITY. That's how you treat your customers if you have the self respect for QUALITY.

If you are OK with producing substandard crap,then sanding it a bit and sending it out,because you really don't care about your customer or your product,well,this is what you do.

Maybe we accept it because its just easier that way.Maybe we find a different gunmaker.

But its really NOT OK ,and we should not accept it.

Would you want your family to fly on an aircraft made to that standard? Rifle barrels and aircraft parts are not so different.
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