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Old March 22, 2014, 03:54 AM   #1
10-96
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US Model 1917 Eddystone

Hey ya'll. I too am reburbing a 1917. Ended up with a Boyds stock, originals just aren't in my price range. Looks nice so far though. What I'm duped on is this- What is the correct sling for this thing? My bbl is dated 03/18 and the receiver dates to 04/18. There is no import stamp, and the finish... well, that's got me stumped too. It's got a dullish finish, not a shiny polish type blue- but it's not parked like any of my WWII era 1903A3's, garands, or M1 carbine.

When looking up info on the 1917 Kerr Sling- it lists 1903's, Thompsons, and the 1917 Enfield. The 1907 leather sling lists those minus the Thompson. So, which is the rightest sling for a rifle that does not appear to have been pressed into WWII service?

Also, those oblong swivels and stacking swivel- as you look at the bottom of the rifle as it lays on it's sights- do they point (oblong end) to the right or left, or did they get squirted out of the factory both ways?

Thanks in advance!
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Old March 22, 2014, 11:29 AM   #2
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This comes up from time to time on the collecting forum I go to re: slings.

The answer is- in 1918 the Model 1907 sling had been adopted, and we were at war. If the quartermaster had something else...you were issued something else.

"Correct" ends up being very much a debate. No supply sergeant in 1918 would say "Hey, I can't issue that [fill in the blank] sling to you! It's not "correct" based on your receiver date.". Instead he'd hand you a sling and tell you to scram. In WWII, he'd be a few years older, and he'd hand you a sling...and tell you to scram!

I feel you cannot go wrong with the M1907, but anything that was issued and kept in stock arguably could be on it.

re: the finish, 'parkerizing' is just a trade-name, after all. There are several different phosphate coatings that could be referred to as under the loose banner of 'parkerizing'. It's like 'kleenex', in a way- every disposable tissue gets called a kleenex, and every adhesive bandage is a 'band-aid'. My Father has a 1903A3 that is 'parkerized' but it is smooth and very dark. At first glance it can look blued.
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Old March 23, 2014, 02:27 AM   #3
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Thanks Chris.

So, on your collectors site- have you been able to view early photos of the rifles, as issued, -and clear enough to determine what slings may have been 'most common' on them? I'm a Vet, I do have some idea of how it is when an arms room cave dweller or supply sgt randomly pokes goodies through the bean hole.

Re the finish... Does anyone know if the original 1917 finish more closely resembled the fine look of the Krag, or was it a dull polish?
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Old March 23, 2014, 06:35 AM   #4
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Thanks for your service.

Not a lot of photos there on that site, but for good reference, I fall back to Bruce Canfield in his 'US Military Bolt Action Rifles', which I highly recommend, ISBN 1-931464-43-X

In his book there are many photos of the M1917 and a lot have M1907 slings, from WWI up

He lists the following:

M1907 was the primary sling issued on M1917
M1917 Kerr was supplemental for use on M1917
M1923 was rare but on occasion used on M1917
M1 sling (1942) was suitable and would fit any US rifle in service at the time. It began service use by '43 and while seen on many M1917s it still did not completely replace the M1907
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Old July 18, 2017, 08:07 PM   #5
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Still got a question on my 1917...
Does anyone know if the oblong sling swivels and stacking swivel originally pointed to the left or to the right? Or, was one direction more common than the other?

Sorry for digging up a zombie, but I realized I still don't know the answer.
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Old July 18, 2017, 10:02 PM   #6
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The sling and stacking swivels were offset so as not to interfere with the line of sight of the long range sights, which were mounted on the left side of the Pattern 1914. The US eliminated the long range sight as not needed under US tactical doctrine, so it does not appear on the Model 1917. But there was no need to change the swivels, so they remained offset, "long" side to the right.

Jim
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Old July 18, 2017, 10:23 PM   #7
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Now who would've thunk it? I wondered how they became off-set to begin with. I assumed it might have had something to do with carrying slung and accommodating packs and LBE-type equipment.

Anyways, thank you for the info! It seems by whatever stroke of luck, I managed to get them on correctly... 3 years ago.
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Old August 6, 2017, 06:15 PM   #8
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This might help. I continue to be somewhat confused by it all myself.

http://forums.thecmp.org/showthread.php?t=213401
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Old August 6, 2017, 08:40 PM   #9
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Good stuff there. Thanks RC!
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