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Old July 10, 2018, 02:40 AM   #1
mellow_c
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Blued Revolvers: How do you store them?

This question comes about because of my interest in nice older Smith & Wesson revolvers.

I've always been a fan of keeping firearms clean with a light coat of oil on them, and then stored in a silicone treated gun sock of some sort (Usually the cheapest ones I can find, maybe from ebay, probably from China).

I'm wondering how you all store your nice blued revolvers to keep them as good as new and impervious to atmospheric or really any sort of physical damage.

I've read (online of course) that some people say gun socks are a real no no with fine firearms because they don't let the gun breath and can trap moisture or affect the finish by making constant contact with the firearm for a long time...

I'm not really sure I believe that.
I live in Colorado so extreme humidity isn't a big concern, and I like the idea of gun socks because it allows firearms to be laid next to one another in storage without causing damage to each other, while they also claim to prevent rust.

Just curious to hear how you all feel. I know that some of you might have rather generous collections, or maybe just a really long time with one particular revolver, so I'd love to hear about your opinions and experiences.
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Old July 10, 2018, 04:30 AM   #2
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I definitely agree on the oil. The last thing I always do when I clean them is rub them with an oily rag.
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Old July 10, 2018, 06:09 AM   #3
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I used to use oil on mine, but I've switched to Renaissance wax for the last several years. (Renaissance is the brand) I remove the grips, clean the oil off the exterior, then apply a couple of coats of the wax. My guns don't collect dust, or show fingerprints. They certainly don't rust, but to be honest, they never did when I used oil either.

I store them in clean white socks. Just plain old socks. Keeps them rubbing against one another.

Model 57 (41 Magnum)



And there is something satisfying about sitting down with a gun, and a can of wax. Almost makes me wish I still smoked a pipe.
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Old July 10, 2018, 06:11 AM   #4
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You've got the right idea with the silicon impregnated gun socks. I think most of mine are made by Allen and they work great for keeping guns ding and rust free in the safe.
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Old July 10, 2018, 06:38 AM   #5
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I also use the socks for every gun - handguns, rifles, and shotguns - if for nothing more than to help prevent "safe dings". Now living in the humid South (from the dry West), I still have no rust issues. A wipe down with an old oil-impregnated rag and into the safe with a goldenrod and three boxes of desiccant.
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Old July 10, 2018, 07:24 AM   #6
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Wipe down with oil (or wax for long term storage), place in gun sock.

I've never had rust issues.
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Old July 10, 2018, 07:55 AM   #7
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KY guy here....heavy humidity in the summers, but not so much (<70%) down in the basement where the gun safe is. I run a dehumidifyer down there which helps I think.

I store all of my handguns, upright in a notched rack of my own construction, on the top shelf of the safe. I added a strip of poly-cloth to the notches to cushion the barrels, and the guns are oiled on a bi-monthly rotation, or whenever they've been handled. With this regime, I've never had a rust issue.

Do some research on the type of cloth that will not absorb water if you cover the notches doing it my way. Standing the guns on their butts, with only the bbls. touching the notches seems to work out well, preventing the 'gun safe rash' so prevalent with many used guns.

The safe, BTW, does not have add'l anti-rusting devices...de-humidifying rods etc., but these are a damned good idea in my estimation. Too, the safe keeps the dust away that's generated by my adjacent wood-working shop.

The worst thing for any blued or stainless gun in my opinion, is to store it in any type of leather holster. Chrome or vegetable tanned hides, it doesn't matter...they'll attract moisture. And as we all know, politicians and rust are a gun's mortal enemies.

YMMV, Rod

Quote:
goldenrod and three boxes of desiccant
Good idea!!!
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Old July 10, 2018, 09:13 AM   #8
Driftwood Johnson
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Quote:
I store them in clean white socks. Just plain old socks. Keeps them rubbing against one another.
That's a great idea!

Thanks!

I have so many revolvers that many of them are wrapped in red mechanics towels to keep them from scratching each other. My very best are stored in vertical wooden racks to keep them from rubbing against each other. The not quite the best are wrapped in towels and piled on top of each other.

Yes, I know it is terrible, but until I make some more room in my safe that is what I have to do. All are locked in safes, to comply with state law here, so none are out gathering dust.

And yes, most are not oiled, they are wrapped in towels and locked up.

I can see I need to buy a whole lot of socks now.
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Old July 10, 2018, 09:47 AM   #9
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I am another Renaissance wax user.
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Old July 10, 2018, 09:57 AM   #10
Bob Wright
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I keep my guns in leather cushioned zipper cases. Most have lambswool lining, though those are getting harder to find.

As I've said repeatedly, I use my 50/50 mix of motor oil and Three-In-One machine oil. I oil the gun heavily, then wipe it down with a soft cloth. Some of my guns have been stored thus for four or five years. And one in my shop is subject to extreme heat and cold, but it kept in a cigar box for handiness.

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Old July 10, 2018, 10:36 AM   #11
Dave T
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I have coated wire racks in the safe and store revolvers up-right in those racks.

Since I live in a dry climate (central Arizona) after cleaning I wipe them down with a clean rag and set them back in the rack.

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Old July 10, 2018, 10:48 AM   #12
RickB
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I keep my guns wiped-down with preservative and stored in plastic racks intended for dinnerware.

The spacing of the racks varies for bowls and plates, so the more widely spaced openings are used for revolvers, and the narrowest ones for small autos.
It minimizes the contact of the guns with the carpet safe lining, the rack itself, and each other.

I also keep enough silica gel in the safe to dehumidify a large room!
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Old July 10, 2018, 10:52 AM   #13
CajunBass
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Quote:
I can see I need to buy a whole lot of socks now.
Go to your favorite "dollar store." About a dozen pairs to a pack, and the pack is pretty inexpensive.

All different sizes too. Men's, women's, kids...something to fit every handgun I'm sure.
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Last edited by CajunBass; July 13, 2018 at 05:04 AM.
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Old July 10, 2018, 11:59 AM   #14
Bobshouse
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My two cents.

I keep my guns in silicone gun socks (both long guns and handguns) in a safe with a dehumidifying rod. I wipe them down with Renaissance wax instead of oil. When I take them out I place them into gun cases for trips to the range. If Im not going to shoot the firearm for a length of time, I apply the Renaissance wax without wiping it off for storage. It protects better and is easily removed with a polishing cloth years after its applied.

Never store them in any case or sock that has been exposed to the weather at the range. When you place them back in the case or sock, the humidity or fog they were exposed to has settled into your material and will look to start rust. Especially after they have been fired and are still warm.

Renaissance wax is the best thing on the market right now IMHO, its expensive, but lasts forever, I have a container I purchased 3 years ago and its not even half empty yet.
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Old July 10, 2018, 03:46 PM   #15
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When not in use or easy access is desired I keep all handguns in sealed plastic gun box with a large packet of moisture absorber. The box goes inside the safe.
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Old July 10, 2018, 08:45 PM   #16
Obambulate
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Ren Wax, oily rag, padded zipper cases. Never a problem.
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Old July 10, 2018, 09:16 PM   #17
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Slathered in oil, from a rag, in cases. I'll wipe them down 1 or 2x a year.
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Old July 11, 2018, 01:18 AM   #18
mellow_c
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Great posts everyone! Thanks!

So this Renaissance wax sounds pretty amazing.

CajunBass, the glossy depth to the bluing on your model 57 is incredible. I know these revolvers look great on their own, but is that extra luster a result of the wax?

I'd love to hear more about this wax from those of you who use it. How do you apply it? Does it act as a lubricant on the cylinder to help prevent the turn ring that shows up on all revolvers from regular use? If not do you oil or grease that area separately? Do you sort of let the wax dry and then buff off the excess wax to a high gloss after application just like you do a car, or is it a different consistency and process of use? How do you use the wax in combination with oil and grease, because i would assume you still oil or grease the typical moving parts of the revolver and only use the wax on visible surface areas? Where do you NOT apply the wax?

Obviously I want to know anything and everything you're all willing to share in regards to the renaissance wax. I've been wondering what type of oil or grease would help to enrich or compliment the look of the blueing on these nice older smiths and maybe this wax is just the ticket.

It's good to hear that so many of you use silicone treated gun socks and all with no negative experiences to report.

Last edited by mellow_c; July 11, 2018 at 06:15 AM.
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Old July 11, 2018, 08:50 AM   #19
CajunBass
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This is what it looked like when I put it on layaway. I bought it really because it's about the most beautiful Smith & Wesson I've ever seen. I have almost no interest in the 41 Magnum cartridge, but love the gun. (Yes, I have fired it.)



The light and grips are different of course, but it was a stunning revolver when I got it, but wax, never hurts.

I apply it with my finger. A little goes a long way, and I just use it sort of like you would car wax. Put it on, let it dry then buff it off with a clean soft rag. I always remove the grips and wax under them. You can use the wax on the grips also, although you might want avoid the checkering just because it's so hard to get out.

No, it's not a lubricant, although I'm sure it performs some function as one. I don't know of anything that will prevent a turn ring, and have never seen a well used revolver that didn't have one. Maybe others know of some way.

You can probably find it in stores of some kind. I just order it online. I've got a 200 ml jar that I've had for years, and I've still got more than half I suppose.

Here's another not quite so dramatic "before and after." The gun is a 1954, K-22 Combat Masterpiece. It was made in the post war years when S&W was still using the flat wartime finish to speed production.



Now here it is later, after I waxed it. The light is different, as is the background and I've changed the grips, but I think it shows a difference.



I can promise, it won't hurt anything.
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Old July 11, 2018, 08:33 PM   #20
Driftwood Johnson
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Just got home from Wally World with a couple of dozen socks. Gonna start transitioning from mechanics rags to socks.
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Old July 11, 2018, 10:15 PM   #21
Model12Win
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I use RIG gun grease on mine, works nicely.
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Old July 11, 2018, 10:32 PM   #22
mellow_c
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CajunBass,
Thanks for the advice. I think eventually here I will give the Renaissance wax a try.

Driftwood Johnson,
Glad to hear you've got yourself a new storage plan! I hope the socks fit well. And now you'll have a good number of extra all purpose rags laying around!
I think I'll stick with the silicone treated gun socks because I like that they fit more loosely than a regular foot sock and they have draw strings. Also because of the whole silicone thing. But I would assume regular socks will work just fine for ya.

Model12Win,
I'll have to check the RIG grease out. Any particular reason you use it over other greases or methods?
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Old July 12, 2018, 01:36 AM   #23
mellow_c
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Just thought I'd pass on to you all a new to me Gun Sock that is apparently the BEST.

Sack-Ups


Check them out.

They are not much more expensive than all the made in China ones I see everywhere. They are made in the USA. They also claim to have the BEST protection of all available gun socks.

There are some video testimonials of people on their website stating that they had guns in Sack-Ups along side other types of gun socks, and those guns were exposed to extreme moisture, smoke from a fire, and other such things... all of them said that in every case, the guns stored in the Sack-Ups faired FAR better than the ones that were in other types of gun socks.


That's good enough for me. I think I'll probably buy some in the future, and stick with them going forward. Maybe I'll even switch out the ones I have now for Sack-Ups.


The way I look at it is, why not spend $5 - $7 to buy the best protection available for a firearm that costs anywhere between $200 - $2000.


But I guess it depends on how many guns you have... and how much money you have to burn... and how concerned you really are about such things happening to your firearms.
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Old July 13, 2018, 08:32 PM   #24
Drm50
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I have quite a few S&W revolvers and other revolvers and auto pistols. All
blue except 1 stainless and 1 nickel. I store them in shallow drawers that I
built for that purpose. Draws are lined with Machinist Pig cloth. I wipe them
with light gun oil and am careful not to touch metal when putting away. Haven't
had any issues and been doing it for over 40yrs.
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Old July 15, 2018, 04:35 PM   #25
M88
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FYI on the socks, which I've been using for years, especially when transporting several guns in a locked case to another location (to keep them from dinging each other)... I found that the extra stretchy socks often labeled "safe for diabetes" socks, slip over my larger handguns more easily because they stretch more. handguns like my G20 or my huge SAA Pietta cap and ball won't fit easily in my standard socks.
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