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Old March 18, 2017, 12:47 PM   #1
dgludwig
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Grips Don't Matter Much to Me But They Do Matter

Over the many years of reading about how some handgun grips don't fit many hands, I've come to wonder if I wasn't born with a mutant hand. I can understand why a person with small hands might experience difficulty reaching the trigger on some larger handguns but my hands are only slightly larger than "average" and I've yet to grip a pistol that I couldn't adapt to and get comfortable with, from a Ruger LCP to a Ruger Redhawk and everything in-between, in a relatively short period of time. Yes, some grips fit me much better than others, of course, but I've never handled a pistol I couldn't get "used to" and shoot decently.

Maybe I'm just lucky having a "universal" hand or maybe I'm just not as picky as some. Anybody else have hands like mine?
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Old March 18, 2017, 01:20 PM   #2
Nathan
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Likely, you just complain less. I find 99% of handguns quite grippable. I do see value in some designs over others, but find nothing unshootable.

On the other hand, the smallest and largest guns would not be fast in my hand.
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Old March 18, 2017, 04:06 PM   #3
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Grips Don't Matter Much to Me But They Do Matter

Your Grip is the most important part of your control of the firearm! Some people say that one pistol is more accurate than another. The pistol will fire a bullet in a sight line in the direction in which it is pointed. Choose a firearm that has a grip (depending on size of your hand) that is easy to control with your Aim, Stance, Grip, Breathing, Trigger pull and Follow through that is comfortable to you with its caliber recoil. A firearm is NOT accurate in most cases....The shooter is the key to accuracy!
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Old March 18, 2017, 04:54 PM   #4
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I'm a lot like you. Some grips are more comfortable than others, but I have yet to encounter a grip that I hated or couldn't shoot at least somewhat competently. I never got into high-end target pistols or serious competition, so maybe I would feel different in those venues, but for carry, plinking, and informal range shooting I can get along with just about any pistol.
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Old March 18, 2017, 04:55 PM   #5
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Your Grip is the most important part of your control of the firearm! Some people say that one pistol is more accurate than another. The pistol will fire a bullet in a sight line in the direction in which it is pointed. Choose a firearm that has a grip (depending on size of your hand) that is easy to control with your Aim, Stance, Grip, Breathing, Trigger pull and Follow through that is comfortable to you with its caliber recoil. A firearm is NOT accurate in most cases....The shooter is the key to accuracy!
I certainly won't disagree that the "shooter is the key to accuracy" nor that having a good grip is important in "controlling" a firearm but:

(1) In terms of shooting accurately, though all of the factors involved in the shooting discipline amounts to pyramid of sorts, where each element is dependent on the other to achieve the end (hitting the "x" in the ten-ring of the bullseye)-sight alignment, trigger squeeze, breath control, stance, grip and follow-through; the proper grip is decidedly not the equivalent of sight alignment and control of the trigger. You can grip the handgun in different ways (some prefer a much tighter grip than others, for instance) and still shoot accurately but you cannot shoot accurately if you jerk the trigger or don't have the front and rear sights oriented properly.

(2) Some pistols are more accurate than others and a good shooter can exploit the difference. Yes, a "pistol will fire a bullet in a sight line in the direction in which it is pointed", but the pistol that will fire the second and subsequent bullets closer to the same place on the target is the more accurate one.

It is certainly a good idea to choose a pistol that fits your hand best but, in some venues (Bullseye competition being a good example, where there are some courses of fire where the Model 1911 pistol is mandated), you don't have a choice and must make do with what is required.
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Old March 18, 2017, 05:00 PM   #6
mrdaputer
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OP have you ever shot a Walther PPQ? I agree that most ppl should shoot any pistol well but some just feel better than others.
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Old March 18, 2017, 05:19 PM   #7
dgludwig
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No, I haven't, mrdaputer, but just to be clear: I'm not saying that I don't like some grips better than others (I'm a big fan of the CZ 75/85 grip), I'm just saying that I seem to get along fine with more different types and sizes of grips than some others do.
For instance, I've read countless times where some shooters despise the angle of the grip on Glock pistols, no matter the size of their hands. Now, I'm no Glock aficionado and do not currently own one, but I shoot them just fine. I have just never understood the ruckus of some lamenting over that supposed angle of the dangle deficiency. Like I said, maybe I'm too indiscriminate to be discriminating.
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Old March 19, 2017, 01:03 AM   #8
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Generally speaking, I find that I'm also able to adapt to almost any style grip size or shape. There certainly are those that I prefer because they just FEEL better, but I rarely come across a grip that I just hate. My hands are rather long and slender (my gut is not! ), so maybe that helps.

Just a few days ago, I was shooting a Springfield 1911. Before I left the range, I decided to pull out my old Jennings J22 that I carried in my bag, just for giggles, and ran 50 rounds through it. THAT certainly felt odd...going from a full size 1911 to a mini mouse gun. But, once I got the Jennings situated in my hand, it was no big deal.

I particularly like the feel of the CZ and Beretta 92 grips. I like the way that they fill my hand and fall into the web between the thumb and forefinger. I really like S&W revolvers with the old style, wooden target stocks. I have no problems with those at all and much prefer them to a rubber Hogue, which I find to be too skinny to feel good in my hand.

I sympathize with guys who have "chubby" hands and shorter fingers. I can definitely see where they might have problems with a number of guns. That's a shame, since it probably keeps them from enjoying a lot of nice guns.
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Old March 19, 2017, 04:43 AM   #9
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It depends on your hand size. I have enormous hands. There are some handguns I just can't shoot well with the factory grips (or at all, sometimes) because there is is just not enough material there for me to grasp and control.

I also have a very short friend with small hands who can't shoot other handguns properly or at all because they are just too large for his hands.

Those of you with more average-sized hands are luckier than you realize.
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Old March 19, 2017, 10:33 AM   #10
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I see grips on handguns like I see stocks on rifles. There are those that can improve one's shooting ability and enjoyment, ones that can reduce that ability and enjoyment, and those that are only for looks. There are also those for intended purposes, like ease of CWC and strictly bench rest target shooting. For the most part, there is a tradeoff of some kind. Those handgun grips that make shooting the biggest magnum handguns most pleasant, generally are not the best looking and vice-versa. For some that pleasantness is more important than looks and to others, they'd rather hurt after a few rounds, than put those "ugly" rubber grips on their "baby". Big bulky target stocks on a lighweight hunting rifle is not an attribute many folks that stalk hunt prefer. I'd assume most factory grips are sized for the average hand, just like the average off the shelf rifle is going to have a stock that will fit the arm length of the target market. This is when being "average" is a good thing. Not so much when quality footwear and other apparel goes on sale. TALO and Lew Horton make their money off dealer exclusives with fancy grips/stocks. Whole cottage industry out there for fancy grips and stocks. Seems grips/stocks matter to many folks.
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Old March 19, 2017, 11:39 AM   #11
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Slightly larger than "average" is all it takes. Except for a 2" M19 with its 'J' frame grip, I need a half inch more finger for Smith 'K' frames to fit my hand. Need about 2" more for a Desert Eagle.
"...couldn't get "used to"..." Point is that you shouldn't have to do that. A hand gun should fit right from the get go.
"...where the Model 1911 pistol is mandated..." Is in the U.S. only. Not that it matters. 1911's fit most hands with no fuss.
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Old March 19, 2017, 11:50 AM   #12
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Grip, sights, trigger, and recoil, I tend to be very adaptable to most anything I shoot. Don't know if it's just me, or is it that most who make forum posts about such things are just beating themselves up over perfection rather than learning to adapt.
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Old March 19, 2017, 12:09 PM   #13
buck460XVR
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Don't know if it's just me, or is it that most who make forum posts about such things are just beating themselves up over perfection rather than learning to adapt.
Probably just you. There really is no legitimate reason to have to adapt other than economics. Considering the initial cost of many quality firearms that folks purchase for accuracy and shooting enjoyment, the cost of grips that fit is a very minor investment. Keeping grips or a stock that make for inaccuracy or pain is just wasting sending good bullets downrange. Many of us over the years have gone thru times when we could not afford to change the grips or stock on a particular poor fitting weapon. Sometimes the weapon needed more than new grips or a stock. That does not mean we didn't desire a change. Far too many folks out there are shooting shotguns that fit poorly and go their whole life not knowing a different shotty would significantly change their hunting/shooting success. Yes, they adapt their shooting style or sighting, but in the long run, it's just a band-aid over a wound that needs medical attention.
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Old March 19, 2017, 01:37 PM   #14
dgludwig
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"...couldn't get "used to"..." Point is that you shouldn't have to do that. A hand gun should fit right from the get go.
Quote:
There really is no legitimate reason to have to adapt other than economics.
There are more than a few cases where you do have to adapt if you plan on using a handgun for its/your intended purpose(s). Obvious comparisons include adapting to compact pistol grips (i.e., a Ruger LCP or a Smith & Wesson J-frame AirWeight) used for carrying concealed vs conforming to target pistol grips (i.e., a Colt Gold Cup 1911 or a Hammerli International) used for Bullseye competition. Then there are many venues that require adapting to different handgun grips if you have any hope of being proficient at or being legitimate, examples of which include "Cowboy Action" events, large frame handguns for use in hunting and long-range silhouette shooting, to name a few that come to mind.

Fortunately for most of us, the human hand is a very adaptable appendage.
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Old March 19, 2017, 04:45 PM   #15
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There really is no legitimate reason to have to adapt other than economics.
Except for the fact that my "accumulation" extends from a NAA Mini Revolver in 22 short to a Thompson Center Contender having barrels ranging from 22LR to 45-70. With many stops along the way at mouse guns to Magnum blasters. Pistols, Revolvers, commercial, milsurps, antique, and modern.
To enjoy shooting each, and every one as I do, I absolutely have to adapt!
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Old March 19, 2017, 07:20 PM   #16
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To a certain extent, I agree with the OP; a person can adapt/adjust to almost any grip, as long as they are willing to put in the time.

That said, In recent years I decided that although I could adapt to almost any grip while at the range, this wasn't going to work for me in a real SD situation.

My moment of truth came while practicing draw-and-points with my Beretta 96F. Now, when shooting slow, aimed fire at the range, I readily adapted to the just-a-bit-too-large grip and could shoot good groups with it all day.

However, when I tried to draw and point quickly, I found that my sights were almost never properly lined up, nor was the gun itself secured most of the time in my hands. And most troubling of all, my index finger usually was just barely able to hook over the trigger face (in DA). And sometimes I couldn't do that.

I discovered that I almost always had to make a slight adjustment right after the draw as my support hand came in from the side. And if I tried to point shoot, the rounds were scattered all over the target. In the end, I realized that the grip on that gun was just a little too big for me to trust it as a SD/HD weapon. A few months later I sold it in favor of a SIG P229, which has a slightly smaller grip, and is almost perfect for my size hands.

So while I can usually figure out how to adapt to most any gun grip, for SD/HD purposes, I have decided that grip size and shape are extremely important criteria in choosing what arms I'll carry/purchase. Any guns that aren't consistently point-able become non-carry guns or range guns.

This is actually one of the principle reasons I don't carry my Glock 19 on a regular basis. Something about the grip (it's not too large) perhaps just it's shape, doesn't lend itself to consistent point-ability for me. If I had a situation where I had to just draw, point, and fire with it, I'd had almost no idea of where the rounds would go. On the other hand, with my 1911s or my 229, or even any of my revolvers, at close range without using the sights I can repeatedly hit a sheet of paper at 15 ft. With the Glock, I just don't have that level of consistency, so it's not going to be a primary carry weapon for me.

Ymmv.
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Old March 19, 2017, 07:56 PM   #17
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Kindly look at the Pachmayr "Professional Gripper" grips..

I like that they are longer in the "fore / aft" direction, but thinner in the width.

I wear the D3A size 5 gloves.

Good luck. Keep searching.
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Old March 19, 2017, 11:22 PM   #18
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I have large hands ( XL gloves are usually too small )....so there are a lot of compact guns that I cannot grip comfortably....so I gravitate to larger full size guns ...and I often fit them with larger grips.

To me a full sized 1911, 5" barrel.....is slim and comfortable ...especially if it's fit with a mag well and as small as I want to go for a carry gun ....

....Sig X Five L1 model with the large Nil grips feels great to me...I put bigger grips on my N frame revolvers....I like S&W square butt frames over a round butt...I like the large frame Freedom Arms model 83, 5 shot single action revolvers over their smaller mid sized model 97's....

In my view - shooting quickly and accurately requires grips that fit your hands....and the right grip angle, weight, balance, etc..../ i think you're lucky you have more options than I do ...in guns, cars, etc ...one size does not fit everyone...
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Old March 20, 2017, 08:25 AM   #19
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OP, I think it's like anything else: cars, gloves, shoes, knives, etc.

You can get used to pretty much anything, but when you find something that fits you well, it's just that much better.

I can drive a Toyota Corolla, but I'm a tall guy and it's not comfortable.
I use $2 work gloves from Walmart in a pinch, but prefer my nice deerskin gloves.
I can walk in any size 12 shoes, but we all take the time to find the shoe that fits just right.

I'm one of those guys that complains about the Glock grip angle. Sure, yes, I can shoot my Glock 19s ok if I focus, but it's like my CZ's shoot themselves. It's just a much better fit, like a good pair of shoes.
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Old March 20, 2017, 09:28 AM   #20
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I guess I must have average size hands also. I've seen reviews berating the stock GP100 Hogue grips as terrible and way to big while other say they are way to small. Mine fit perfect. I bought a S&W model 60 and just can't get used to the tiny grips. I added a Tyler T grip extender doodad and that helps a little but I just ahve a hard time finding any consistent firm grip. The stock Magna grips on old S&W's work fine for me when shooting single action but shooting double action I find myself adjusting my grip position and finger position half way through the trigger pull trying to maintain a steady hold of the small grips. The larger target style grips work much better.
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Old March 20, 2017, 09:56 AM   #21
Skans
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I too find 99% of most handguns very grippable and easy to shoot. I also find most hammers easy to grip. Grip is just not an issue with me when considering most handguns.
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Old March 20, 2017, 02:40 PM   #22
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Hands are like feet. If yours work fine with OTC products, great, if you have any kind of problems, "deviations" from the norm, custom made and fitted items provide so much comfort they are well worth it. Colt target grips fit me fine, S&Ws do not, hence my S&Ws wear either Pachmayrs or Herrett's.
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Old March 21, 2017, 01:34 AM   #23
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In my case, grip width and texture are more about comfort and carry consideration. Since I have long fingers, it's reach that makes all the difference. Skinny grips with a double-action trigger that breaks way back can be a problem for me. Some of the "large" back straps offered on modern poly pistols crawl up under the beaver tail and that has done a world of good for me as my joints age.
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Old March 21, 2017, 10:06 AM   #24
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Grips Don't Matter Much to Me But They Do Matter
They work well, or not so well. Sometimes you can do something about it, often not.

I'm very picky about revolver grips, where the choices are vast. There's not as much you can do for an automatic. And very little you can do for a plastic autoloader that won't kill the resale value.
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Old March 21, 2017, 12:01 PM   #25
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To a certain extent, I agree with the OP; a person can adapt/adjust to almost any grip, as long as they are willing to put in the time.
As I have gained more experience in life, I have found that "time" is the only thing I can not get more of if I really want to .....
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