The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: General

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old January 3, 2019, 12:43 PM   #51
Lohman446
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 22, 2016
Posts: 1,746
Quote:
but IMO the best all around cartridge ever!
As an opinion its an opinion and it is for the individual to judge. For me there are simply too many cartridges that are so drastically similar and will do what 99% of their users ever intend to do that there is no functional difference.

Start somewhere above the .243 and end somewhere below the .338 magnums. The various cartridges that fall in there are, for the most part, so close to each other to be indistinguishable except for some niche use.

To the OP's question of "Why not the 30-06" all one can do is shrug. But you can sub in any number of cartridges there and get the same response.
Lohman446 is offline  
Old January 3, 2019, 01:30 PM   #52
IdaD
Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2018
Posts: 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lohman446 View Post
As an opinion its an opinion and it is for the individual to judge. For me there are simply too many cartridges that are so drastically similar and will do what 99% of their users ever intend to do that there is no functional difference.

Start somewhere above the .243 and end somewhere below the .338 magnums. The various cartridges that fall in there are, for the most part, so close to each other to be indistinguishable except for some niche use.

To the OP's question of "Why not the 30-06" all one can do is shrug. But you can sub in any number of cartridges there and get the same response.
While I would agree to a point but I think you stretched out a bit too far. A 30-06 is significantly more powerful and effective against larger game than a 243. Let alone some of the magnums that slot in between the 30-06 and 338 mags.
IdaD is offline  
Old January 3, 2019, 01:41 PM   #53
Lohman446
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 22, 2016
Posts: 1,746
I probably did. I'm not sure exactly where the somewhere above and below is myself. There are a lot of "new" cartridges out there that effectively just do what the 30-06 already did. I'm guessing others can say that the __________ did it before the 06 too.
Lohman446 is offline  
Old January 16, 2019, 01:03 PM   #54
Red Devil
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2010
Posts: 122
As much as I enjoy the .30-06 Springfield (especially out of a 24" Bbl'ed 10.5 lb. M1 Garand)?

I think that the .270 Win is a "better" optimized cartridge for a sporter rifle for medium to large game.

It shoots a 150 gr. bullet at nearly the same velocity as the '06, but that bullet has the BC and SD of the 180 gr. variety, so you get the performance of the heavier bullet with generally accepted tolerable recoil (in the light weight sporter rifle).

Win/win.




Red
Red Devil is offline  
Old January 17, 2019, 05:45 AM   #55
Jack O'Conner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2005
Location: Manatee County, Florida
Posts: 1,888
30-06 is still getting the job done wherever game is hunted. It does not get much press these days in the magazines because its old news.

Jack
__________________
Fire up the grill! Deer hunting IS NOT catch and release.
Jack O'Conner is offline  
Old January 17, 2019, 02:36 PM   #56
RC20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 10, 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 5,673
Yep

Quote:
I'm guessing others can say that the __________ did it before the 06 too.
I disagree. There are 3 distinct eras of firearms.

Black Powder from smooth to rifled. Slow, they did the job, but you needed to be close for penetration (larger game) people. Better than bows and arrows. maybe.

Black Powder in modern cartridges from with rifling. Still a limited range sans the rainbow trajectory subject to everything. 30-40 Kraig and the like.

Modem: Smokeless powders, Spitzer bullets and those all started the more advanced with the 6.5s, 7mm and 30-06 (and some odds and sods from the French etc)
__________________
Science and Facts are True whether you believe it or not
RC20 is offline  
Old January 17, 2019, 03:21 PM   #57
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,407
Quote:
As much as I enjoy the .30-06 Springfield (especially out of a 24" Bbl'ed 10.5 lb. M1 Garand)?
I think that the .270 Win is a "better" optimized cartridge for a sporter rifle for medium to large game.
It shoots a 150 gr. bullet at nearly the same velocity as the '06, but that bullet has the BC and SD of the 180 gr. variety, so you get the performance of the heavier bullet with generally accepted tolerable recoil (in the light weight sporter rifle).
I disagree. Looking at my old Hornady fifth edition handbook, I find six loads (150-155 grain bullets) that reach 3,000 fps. with a 24 in. barrel whereas, the same handbook shows only two loads that hit 2900 fps. with 150 grain bullets. What is notable, is that the loads for the 06 are not likely over the SAAMI limit for the 06 of 60,000 psi. whereas the .270 SAAMI limit is 65,000.
Therefore, if a person hand loaded the 30-06 while watching for pressure signs instead of trying to stay at the SAAMI limit as per the handbook, one could conceivably get the velocity (safely...both pretty much the same cartridge case, in modern rifles), even higher than the 3,000 shown in the handbook.
dahermit is offline  
Old January 17, 2019, 09:33 PM   #58
Red Devil
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2010
Posts: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by dahermit View Post
I disagree. Looking at my old Hornady fifth edition handbook, I find six loads (150-155 grain bullets) that reach 3,000 fps. with a 24 in. barrel whereas, the same handbook shows only two loads that hit 2900 fps. with 150 grain bullets. What is notable, is that the loads for the 06 are not likely over the SAAMI limit for the 06 of 60,000 psi. whereas the .270 SAAMI limit is 65,000.
Therefore, if a person hand loaded the 30-06 while watching for pressure signs instead of trying to stay at the SAAMI limit as per the handbook, one could conceivably get the velocity (safely...both pretty much the same cartridge case, in modern rifles), even higher than the 3,000 shown in the handbook.
Thermonuclear handloads are possible w/ both cartridges.

But who in their right mind would take them to the unpredictable hunting fields?

Diameter, and thereby piston area, favors the 30 cal., whereas BC, SD, and max pressure favor the .270.

But you are never going to drive a 180 gr. 30-06 to the velocity levels of the 150 gr. .270 Win, while retaining the same lower recoil levels.

Because that is what the .270 Win./150 gr. does.




Red
Red Devil is offline  
Old January 18, 2019, 08:30 AM   #59
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,407
Quote:
But you are never going to drive a 180 gr. 30-06 to the velocity levels of the 150 gr. .270 Win, while retaining the same lower recoil levels.

Because that is what the .270 Win./150 gr. does.
No one said anything about comparing a 180 grain 30-06 bullet to 130 grain .270 velocity. That seems to be a strawman argument.

Also, no one suggested shooting either cartridge at unsafe velocities ("thermonuclear")...hand loaders have been increasing powder amounts until pressure signs appear as a standard procedure for years.

The pressure "limit" imposed by SAAMI of 60,000 psi on the 30-06 was for the benefit of the old rifles still in existence and being used. A modern 30-06 would not be in any more danger at 65,000 psi than any .270. In short, the velocities posted in loading manuals for .270s are already near their pressure limit whereas the velocities listed for 30-06 are not.
dahermit is offline  
Old January 18, 2019, 10:09 AM   #60
Red Devil
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 26, 2010
Posts: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by dahermit View Post
No one said anything about comparing a 180 grain 30-06 bullet to 130 grain .270 velocity. That seems to be a strawman argument.

Also, no one suggested shooting either cartridge at unsafe velocities ("thermonuclear")...hand loaders have been increasing powder amounts until pressure signs appear as a standard procedure for years.

The pressure "limit" imposed by SAAMI of 60,000 psi on the 30-06 was for the benefit of the old rifles still in existence and being used. A modern 30-06 would not be in any more danger at 65,000 psi than any .270. In short, the velocities posted in loading manuals for .270s are already near their pressure limit whereas the velocities listed for 30-06 are not.
The 130 gr. .270 was never mentioned.


The problem is, the 150 gr. argument is academic when comparing the two cartridges in the field.

The increased area of the .30 cal does allow a bullet of the same weight to be driven faster w/ the same pressure. That is simple Physics.

But it is not the same bullet.

For the .270 Win./.30-06 Spg. respectively, the bullets of similar BC, SD, and application are:

Medium game: 130 gr./150 gr.
Large game: 150 gr./180 gr.

These are the loads to compare.




Red

Last edited by Red Devil; January 18, 2019 at 10:47 AM.
Red Devil is offline  
Old January 18, 2019, 10:48 AM   #61
dahermit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 28, 2006
Location: South Central Michigan...near
Posts: 5,407
Quote:
For the .270 Win./.30-06 Spg. respectively, the bullets of similar BC, SD, and application are:

Medium game: 130 gr./150 gr.
Large game: 150 gr./180 gr.

These are the loads to compare.
Says who? Those are your personal comparisons. The reputation of the .270 was made on the 130 grain bullet. Any comparison of the 130 grain .270 bullet compared to the 150 grain .30-06 bullet is but a biased effort to show that the .270 is somehow "better".

Your categories of "Medium game" and "Large game" are completely arbitrary and thus meaningless...here in Michigan, the state considers deer to be"Large game" and many .270 shooters have not qualms about using the 130 .270 bullets on deer ("large game").

Last edited by dahermit; January 18, 2019 at 10:56 AM.
dahermit is offline  
Old January 18, 2019, 02:45 PM   #62
44 AMP
Staff
 
Join Date: March 11, 2006
Location: Upper US
Posts: 19,109
Quote:
. 30-40 Kraig and the like.
Am pretty sure the .30-40 Krag is not considered a black powder cartridge...
__________________
All else being equal (and it almost never is) bigger bullets tend to work better.
44 AMP is offline  
Old January 19, 2019, 03:28 PM   #63
tdoyka
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 3, 2013
Location: windber, pa
Posts: 254
the krag couldn't kill an elk, esp with the win m1895!!!!!


https://blog.eastmans.com/world-reco...ld-for-121000/
__________________
its ok to be white - red pill

​Μολών λαβέ ! todd
tdoyka is offline  
Old January 19, 2019, 04:37 PM   #64
briandg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2010
Posts: 5,216
I think that I can give you the correct answer here, it's a very simple thing.

The 30-06 is, for the most part, a round for bolt action rifles only. Lots of people want a lever, this seems to be the second most popular design for larger game.

If you look at the available cartridges that can be used on deer starting with the .243 and ending with the .300 win mag, you have about ten popular competing bolt action rounds. Start at 7-08, 7 mag, .270, .308, the 6.5 rounds, and the short magnums.

It's possible that there are probably more rounds of 30-06 ammunition sold than almost any of the other hunting rounds. It's possible that there are more rifles existing in 30-06 than any of the other rounds, and that in the past, more rifles were sold in that caliber than any other of those normal bolt action rounds.

At this point, I don't think that the 30-06 is the most popular seller compared to all of the individual numbers, I think that it may be the fifth most popular rifle caliber in new rifle sales.

So, if there are eight or so rifle cartridges that are more popular than the .06, and several other types of guns that can't even fire the .06 such as the 30-30, the 30-06 bolt gun will be pretty obviously sell very few rifles, but then, so will the .260 rem, .22-250, other more specialized rifles and calibers. Then again, you will still have a huge assortment of guns and calibers that aren't even close to being related to an ordinary 30-06 rifle.

Take that into account, that the 30-06 bolt is only really useful for deer and other medium to large game, and you have a myriad number of rifles available for every use from prairie dog to elephant.

I would be literally astounded to find out that you sell more than one 30-06 rifle for every fifty rifles of other styles and calibers. It's sort of like the chevy truck, it may be a hugely popular vehicle, but when you count it against every other wheeled vehicle sold, it's an extreme rarity. Count chevy trucks the next time you drive down a highway and you will see what I mean.

I tried to give you some actual numbers but couldn't get any.
__________________
None.
briandg is offline  
Old January 19, 2019, 08:16 PM   #65
bamaranger
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 9, 2009
Location: North Alabama
Posts: 6,647
'06

I have a pal who wheels and deals in private gun trades on a regular basis. He prefers not to handle .308 sporters, as he claims they do not sell well for him. It may be that our corner of AL is a bit backward, but the '06 (and .270) are still very popular and apparently trade well. The 6.5 CR is the new darling and is more popular than I thought it wold be here. Most guys still take their whitetails at 100 yds and under, and any traditional cartridge would suffice (but what fun would that be?).

I only recently started to hunt t 30 '06 when I acquired a very nice mannlicher stocked Mark X Mauser carbine in that caliber for a decent price, as the butt had been shortened by an idiot. I solved the butt pad issue, but do not hunt the Mark X all up power wise, loading 180 gr RN to about .300 Savage levels at 2450+ fps and seems a sure killer on whitetails. Full house 180's get your attention in that short 20" barrel. I've also burned up a lot of -'06 cartridges in M1 Garands in recreational shooting, no competition.
bamaranger is offline  
Old January 20, 2019, 10:54 AM   #66
RC20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 10, 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 5,673
Quote:
Take that into account, that the 30-06 bolt is only really useful for deer and other medium to large game, and you have a myriad number of rifles available for every use from prairie dog to elephant.
Sorry to break the news, but the above (deer to Moose) are 90% (maybe better?) of game taken.

Prairie dog is really a form of target shooting.

And I do agree on the 270. Its claim was flatter shooting with 130 gr bullets. Its more recent that the 150s and 160 gr has been adapted. If a 6.5 is good for moose then a 270 is as well.

Any time anyone comes out with a new rifle, its got 30-06 (and 270) as the first out.
__________________
Science and Facts are True whether you believe it or not
RC20 is offline  
Old January 20, 2019, 11:49 AM   #67
briandg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2010
Posts: 5,216
Quote:
Sorry to break the news, but the above (deer to Moose) are 90% (maybe better?) of game taken.
I don't get your point. Would deer or moose, or elk or even pronghorn not be included in

Quote:
medium to large game

and at what point did anyone say that we are only considering hunting rifles? We've generally ignored anything that isn't in the class of "deer rifles". But by adding them in, the tactical, varmint, precision, what we will do is just add another pile of rifles into the mix of rifles that are outselling the '06.

If I went to academy this afternoon, out of the thirty or so rifes, there wouldn't be a precision rifle or varmint and probably only a couple of '06 bolts.
__________________
None.
briandg is offline  
Old January 22, 2019, 03:03 PM   #68
RC20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 10, 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 5,673
Quote:
Am pretty sure the .30-40 Krag is not considered a black powder cartridge...
Agreed, I lumped it in with that as it was the same concept of a round nose bullet per the 45-70 etc. I believe they tired to hot rod it and did not work so good.
__________________
Science and Facts are True whether you believe it or not
RC20 is offline  
Old January 22, 2019, 03:28 PM   #69
briandg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2010
Posts: 5,216
The story of the krag, as I remember it, was that it was designed and created with smokeless powder as a component. Both the 30-30 and the 30-40 were done this way, and interestingly (to me, at least) they did both use the powder weight as the second designation, following the black powder conventions of the time. they both used a charge of the primitive smokeless powder, probably nothing but nitrocellulose, in charge weights of 30 and 40 respectively.
__________________
None.
briandg is offline  
Old January 22, 2019, 03:30 PM   #70
briandg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 4, 2010
Posts: 5,216
I personally can't imagine cleaning a krag after a day's training with black powder and metal bullets. I suspect that using such a thing would be an absolute failure.
__________________
None.
briandg is offline  
Old January 22, 2019, 03:32 PM   #71
davidsog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 13, 2018
Posts: 584
Quote:
30-06 is still getting the job done wherever game is hunted. It does not get much press these days in the magazines because its old news.

Jack
I have paid more attention since this thread started and note that my .30-06 and .308’s seem to get along just fine. At least if they do disagree it is done quietly without a sound escaping the gun safe.
davidsog is offline  
Old January 22, 2019, 05:54 PM   #72
reinert
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 28, 2008
Posts: 446
There ain't many troubles that a man can't fix...

I thought JJ45 in post #50 was going to bring it out when he mentioned a couple of quotes from Jeff Cooper. Col. Whelen has his classic, timeless saying about the cartridge, but Mr. Cooper also had one, too, that I heard a long, long time ago. Mr. Cooper's daughter, Lindy Cooper Wisdom, wrote this poem using the famous line she heard from her dad from a long time past.

"Grandpa's Lesson"

Pappy took to drinkin' back when I was barely three.
Ma got pretty quiet, she was frettin' you could see.
So I was sent to Grandpa and he raised me up real good,
He taught me what I oughta and he taught me what I should

I learned a heap o' lessons from the yarns he liked to tell,
There's one I won't forget because I learned it 'speshly well.
There jist ain't many folk who live a peaceful, carefree life,
Along with all the good times there'll be lotsa grief and strife.

"But there ain't many troubles that a man cain't fix,
With seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six."

Grampa courted Grandma near the town of old Cheyenne,
Her daddy was cantankerous - a very greedy man.
He wouldn't give permission for a fancy wedding day,
'Till Grandpa paid a dowry - biggest ever people say.

"Her daddy softened up when Grandpa said that he could fix,
Him up with seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six."

Grandpa herded cattle down around Jalisco way,
Ended up behind some iron bars one dusty day.
Seems the local jefe craved my Grandpa's pinto mare,
Grandpa wouldn't sell her so he lit on out of there.

"Didn't take much doin' 'cept a couple special tricks,
Plus seven hundred dollars and his thirty ought six."

Then there was that Faro game near San Francisco Bay,
Grandpa's cards was smokin' hot and he took all one day.
He woke up nearly naked in a ditch next early morn,
With nothin' but his flannel shirt, and it was ripped and torn.

"Those others were professionals and they don't play for kicks,
He lost seven hundred dollars and his thirty ought six."

He begged some woolen trousers off the local storekeep there,
Who loaned him both a pony and a rifle on a dare.
He caught those thievin' cardsharks at another Faro game,
He got back all his property and also his good name.

"He left one bleedin' badly and another mostly lame,
My Grandpa's trusty rifle shoots just where you choose to aim."

Grandpa's slowin' down a bit and just the other night,
He handed me his rifle and a box sealed up real tight.
He fixed me with them pale grey eyes and this is what he said,
"You're awful young but steady too, and I will soon be dead."

I'll bet this here old rifle and this honest money too,
Will come in mighty handy just as readily for you.
There jist ain't many folk who lead a carefree peaceful life,
Along with times of happiness, there's always woe and strife.

"But...ain't many troubles that a man cain't fix,
With seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six.

By Lindy Cooper Wisdom


I, too, have 3 "thirty ought sixes"...love 'em all.
reinert is offline  
Old January 23, 2019, 12:42 PM   #73
P Flados
Member
 
Join Date: January 8, 2017
Location: Wilmington NC
Posts: 26
More than a few new gun buyers read just enough gun / hunting magazines to get a distorted view. Not many magazines "on the stand" today have articles that promote the 308 or the 30-06. Many articles do promote newer rounds that are "better" than the "traditional" rounds that include the 30-06.

Hype does sell. Its all about the marketing. You know, "May the schwartz be with you".

Now lets look at reality.

To start with, consider that at least 95% of the people who are choosing a caliber while at a gun store do not and will never reload. As, such over the counter ammo is what really makes a difference between all of the otherwise good choices. Tell them to think both now and 20 years from now (resale value and/or to be handed down to a kid). Think of how many guns are out there chambered for something that has become nearly unobtainable.

For most rifle buyers in the category being discussed, hunting capabilities of the 30-06 and the 308 with factory ammo are essentially the same as far as the target is concerned. Some 30-06 guns will be slightly heavier. Recoil of both is near the max that an "average Joe" will consider acceptable. Both "just work".

Both of these rounds have a huge ammo selection / availability / cost advantage over other bolt guns.

Ammo supply and cost is almost as good for the 243 and 270. The 7-08 is marginal for optimal ammo availability. All three of these rounds have some real advantages for some hunters.

Some of the newer rounds may have adequate availability now, but will they in 20 years?

If a guy comes into a store looking at bolt guns and is willing to listen to the salesman, then my first suggestion would be to discuss ammo availability. Promote guns that will be easy to find ammo for at the only ammo supply store in a 60 miles radius while they are hunting in some remote location in ten years. Tell them to think of all of "hot" guns of 10 - 20 years ago that would now be nearly useless to them due to ammo supply.

Of the rounds I have mentioned, most will get the job done just fine. For general purpose hunting in the US, the 7-08 is probably the "best choice" by function and the "worst choice" by ammo availability. The 243 is really only something I would recommend where lower recoil is a priority. For someone anticipating longer ranges, the 270 is a great choice. And for anyone not wanting one of the above, they would do well to pick either the 308 or the 30-06 purely based on what ever sounds best to them.

Lots of other rounds actually have real hunting advantages in the US over the 308 / 30-06. However, these advantages (less recoil, flatter shooting, lower gun weight, less muzzle blast) are "nice things" that do not really translate into "higher percentages" for getting the job done. However, except for a few (243, 270, 7-08, 30-30), these advantages come at the cost of reduced ammo availability and significantly less assurance of future reasonable ammo availability.

Last edited by P Flados; January 23, 2019 at 01:30 PM.
P Flados is offline  
Old January 23, 2019, 01:10 PM   #74
RC20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 10, 2008
Location: Alaska
Posts: 5,673
All good points
__________________
Science and Facts are True whether you believe it or not
RC20 is offline  
Old January 23, 2019, 06:20 PM   #75
JJ45
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 8, 2015
Posts: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Flados View Post
More than a few new gun buyers read just enough gun / hunting magazines to get a distorted view. Not many magazines "on the stand" today have articles that promote the 308 or the 30-06. Many articles do promote newer rounds that are "better" than the "traditional" rounds that include the 30-06.

Hype does sell. Its all about the marketing. You know, "May the schwartz be with you".

Now lets look at reality.

To start with, consider that at least 95% of the people who are choosing a caliber while at a gun store do not and will never reload. As, such over the counter ammo is what really makes a difference between all of the otherwise good choices. Tell them to think both now and 20 years from now (resale value and/or to be handed down to a kid). Think of how many guns are out there chambered for something that has become nearly unobtainable.

For most rifle buyers in the category being discussed, hunting capabilities of the 30-06 and the 308 with factory ammo are essentially the same as far as the target is concerned. Some 30-06 guns will be slightly heavier. Recoil of both is near the max that an "average Joe" will consider acceptable. Both "just work".

Both of these rounds have a huge ammo selection / availability / cost advantage over other bolt guns.

Ammo supply and cost is almost as good for the 243 and 270. The 7-08 is marginal for optimal ammo availability. All three of these rounds have some real advantages for some hunters.

Some of the newer rounds may have adequate availability now, but will they in 20 years?

If a guy comes into a store looking at bolt guns and is willing to listen to the salesman, then my first suggestion would be to discuss ammo availability. Promote guns that will be easy to find ammo for at the only ammo supply store in a 60 miles radius while they are hunting in some remote location in ten years. Tell them to think of all of "hot" guns of 10 - 20 years ago that would now be nearly useless to them due to ammo supply.

Of the rounds I have mentioned, most will get the job done just fine. For general purpose hunting in the US, the 7-08 is probably the "best choice" by function and the "worst choice" by ammo availability. The 243 is really only something I would recommend where lower recoil is a priority. For someone anticipating longer ranges, the 270 is a great choice. And for anyone not wanting one of the above, they would do well to pick either the 308 or the 30-06 purely based on what ever sounds best to them.

Lots of other rounds actually have real hunting advantages in the US over the 308 / 30-06. However, these advantages (less recoil, flatter shooting, lower gun weight, less muzzle blast) are "nice things" that do not really translate into "higher percentages" for getting the job done. However, except for a few (243, 270, 7-08, 30-30), these advantages come at the cost of reduced ammo availability and significantly less assurance of future reasonable ammo availability.
I quit reading those mags about 20 years ago because much of what I read conflicted with my own experience. I began to get the feeling that most of the articles were less than objective.

I have always been an '06 man but there are a lot of good cartridges...there are two cartridges that I kinda wish I had rifles chambered for, but don't, the 7mm-08 and .250 Savage.

Both are known for exceptional accuracy. With the right load/bullets, the short action , light recoiling 7mm08 will kill anything in N America. Again, with the right loads, the 250-3000 will do fine on medium game as well as any varmints.
JJ45 is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2018 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.15734 seconds with 11 queries