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Old September 8, 2019, 01:52 AM   #1
TheScout
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Rifle Refurbishing

Hey everyone. I’ve talked about this before, but I inherited a Glenfield Model 25, a Marlin Model 60, a J.C Higgins bolt-action shotgun and an Arisaka Type 38 carbine that was was rechambered for .257 (Roberts I think?) And has a “Fajen” stock. When I got them I cleaned them up and went to work on them with some grade 0000 wire wool to get rid of the rust but I noticed that there’s still a worn look to some of them, especially the Arisaka and the shotgun. I would also like to refinish the wood stocks to make them look nicer. Any idea how to do all of this? I don’t wanna go too crazy with a whole bunch of oils and remedies but I’m willing to try some things out. The wire wool for example was readily available to me and very effective, as these long guns were extremely rusty when I first got them. Please let me know if you have any suggestions! Thank you!
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Old September 8, 2019, 09:48 AM   #2
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I would do what your doing with the 0000 wool , just to remove the rust , wipe it down with alcohol and cold blue the metal , the wood if not abused aged looks nice , try wiping down with Ballistol , good for both metal and wood . To completely refinish the stock then bringing down to bare wood then wet and dry and sand with fine paper until it's smooth as glass . Just like any piece of furniture , pick a stain , any hard finish and use a 0000 steel wool to smooth it out . That's a fun project . I inherited a 1903 Springfield barrel and action . Had to order sights , collars, pins , screws , plates and stock . All luckily went together like a precision puzzle , and it was a tack driver , the Barrel looked like. it was never used , came from my Uncle when he returned from the Korean war . Let my Son in Law use it on his first hunting trip and he shot a 8 pointer first time out . Well the rifle is his now , but sure was fun from beginning to end . Forgot , all the parts almost $ 450.
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Old September 8, 2019, 10:13 AM   #3
Jim Watson
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Quote:
an Arisaka Type 38 carbine that was was rechambered for .257 (Roberts I think?)
The Arisaka is 6.5 mm caliber.
It was common to rechamber them for 6.5x.257 Roberts for a source of common brass to handload. You don't just shoot .257 Roberts ammo.
Unless the whole barrel has been replaced with a true .257".
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Old September 8, 2019, 10:31 AM   #4
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If that J.C. Higgins shotgun is a 12 gauge I wouldn't shoot it until I checked the model number to see if it was recalled. A lot of them were recalled for the receiver breaking behind the bolt handle.
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Old September 8, 2019, 10:43 AM   #5
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Quote:
The Arisaka is 6.5 mm caliber.
It was common to rechamber them for 6.5x.257 Roberts for a source of common brass to handload. You don't just shoot .257 Roberts ammo.
Unless the whole barrel has been replaced with a true .257".
Good catch. 6.5x257 Roberts was a popular rechamber but there is always a question about the specific reamer used. Ackley, for example, did a number of rifles in a 6.5x257 AI, with his typically blow out shoulder. Ideally, yours is just a 7x57 necked down to 6.5 mm, ie the 6.5x57, for which both loaded ammo and brass is available. A chamber cast or fire-forming some 257 Roberts brass will tell you what you actually have. That's a pretty great cartridge.
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Old September 8, 2019, 12:35 PM   #6
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Thank you all for your replies. What exactly is “cold blue the metal”? Also the shot gun is a 12 gauge and was recalled, but from what I’ve read, the issue it had was user error. Something about the owner neglecting to tighten down the screw that acted as the bolt stop. And my plan was to just buy some .257 Roberts and try it out. The barrel is marked “.257”, as I believe my grandfather had sporterized this Type 38. Could someone explain the process of figuring out the caliber again? I’m somewhat new to these these oddball calibers and figuring this stuff out.
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Old September 8, 2019, 03:11 PM   #7
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Show close clear pictures, closeups and overall.
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Old September 8, 2019, 04:34 PM   #8
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Whether you do some cold blueing or not, you should put liquid auto wax or synthetic polish like Simonize on all the metal (and the wood that you don't intend to refinish). That material is meant to protect auto paint and metal from all kinds of weather and it works the same on guns and other metal and finished wood. I've used it for years and never have any rust, even after taking guns hunting in the rain. Just don't wipe the water off in the field, but use a dry cloth to remove moisture and, when dry, add another coat of polish.
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Old September 8, 2019, 07:38 PM   #9
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the shot gun is a 12 gauge and was recalled, but from what I’ve read, the issue it had was user error. Something about the owner neglecting to tighten down the screw that acted as the bolt stop.
The bolt is latched in battery by a shoulder of the receiver that butts against the base of the bolt handle. Due to the design, when material is milled away for the 12 gauge there is not enough left to reliably withstand the force exerted on firing. The metal is sheared off and the bolt is blown back, shearing off the set screw, and giving the shooter a face full of bolt but it's your funeral.
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Old September 8, 2019, 10:01 PM   #10
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On the Ariska, i'd have someone do a chamber casting for you.
Paul Mauser also made a 6.5X57 Mauser.
Then there is the 6.5 Carcano. And a 6.5 Jap.

Seriously!
Get a chamber casting done!
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Old September 9, 2019, 06:47 AM   #11
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Cold blue is a liquid blue , comes in a tube , will turn bare metal black.
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Old September 9, 2019, 12:55 PM   #12
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"...don’t wanna go too crazy with a whole bunch of oils..." Use Pure Tung Oil(not Tung Oil Finish). Properly applied(that isn't difficult, but is sort of time consuming. Strip the old finish off first. Then one coat per day gets rubbed in with a clean lint free cloth and left to dry for 24 hours between coats. Five days will give you a nice sheen.) it gives a hard, water proof, shiny, finish. The more coats you put on the shinier it gets. If you want to put any stain on, it must go on before the first coat of Tung Oil. Tung Oil seals the wood and keeps everything out.
Sounds like you need to do a chamber cast on the Type 38. That's done with Cerrosafe, a metal that can be molded. Brownell's sells it at $14.99 per half pound. It's not as expensive as it sounds as a half pound is more than enough and it's reusable. Read the instructions carefully.
https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-t...y-prod384.aspx
"...“cold blue the metal”?..." You buy a bottle of cold bluing, either liquid of paste(better) and follow the directions on the bottle. Cold bluing isn't really made for whole firearms though. And it doesn't protect the steel well. It is reasonably inexpensive though.
Might be a better idea to use one of the paint based finishes, like Duracoat or Cerakote.
J.C Higgins is just a Sears brand name. There was no firearms maker named that. J.C Higgins was a Sears VP, as I recall. The shotgun was made by one of the firearms companies for Sears. Anyway, Gunparts has a cross reference page on their site that'll tell you which one.
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Old September 9, 2019, 02:15 PM   #13
Bill DeShivs
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Leave the cold blue alone.
More guns have been ruined by amateur cold bluing than anything else.
Cold blue is designed for touch ups-even if the package says otherwise. Most of it actually PROMOTES rusting, and none of it protects metal well at all.
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Old September 9, 2019, 03:24 PM   #14
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For the stocks, it really depends on what finish is on them now. With old military rifles with that originally had an oil finish, I have had good luck after giving them a good cleaning to just do a oil scrub with Boiled Linseed Oil (applied with 0000 steel wool and "scrubbed" in). I usually do 3 or 4 coats scrubbed, followed by one hand rubbed (with a full day to dry between coats) , rubbed long enough to get it warm.

Once it is completely dry give it a coat of paste wax.

Here is a 1916 Spanish Mauser I cleaned up this way, the finish was pretty tired, and it was the filthiest rifle I have ever seen. Turned out kind of nice.
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Old September 9, 2019, 04:53 PM   #15
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Thank you all again for your suggestions. I’m working on getting some pictures up for you guys to see what we’re working with here. I will also look into all of your suggestions, especially the cautions on the J.C Higgins shotgun. Probably gonna be a wall hanger and buy a new shotgun (Over under maybe?) I’ll keep you updated on the process of using the suggestions you gave me. Out of curiosity @emcon5, do you shoot that Mauser? Do you shoot your surplus rifles or just have them as an antique piece?
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Old September 9, 2019, 05:02 PM   #16
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emcon5
Great Project , Very Nice Job . Enjoy your great rifle , it's nice to put life back in a forgotten rifle .
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Old September 9, 2019, 06:55 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheScout
Out of curiosity @emcon5, do you shoot that Mauser? Do you shoot your surplus rifles or just have them as an antique piece?
Yeah, I have shot it, not as much as some of the others, but I try and shoot everything I own. I love shooting the old military rifles, especially at distance.

This is one of my favorites: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWOePGiaBcM

Quote:
Originally Posted by cw308
Great Project , Very Nice Job . Enjoy your great rifle , it's nice to put life back in a forgotten rifle .
Thanks, I enjoy it, and get a lot of satisfaction out of it.

If you want more info on what I did to that filthy Spaniard, I posted a bunch of details and photos in this thread over on CalGuns:

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...5&post19672605
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Old September 9, 2019, 09:32 PM   #18
cw308
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Looked at the posts on calgun , You sure put TLC in that weapon . Nice Job.

Chris
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Old September 9, 2019, 11:58 PM   #19
Hawg
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J.C Higgins is just a Sears brand name. There was no firearms maker named that. J.C Higgins was a Sears VP, as I recall. The shotgun was made by one of the firearms companies for Sears.
IIRC the ones recalled were made by High Standard.
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Old September 10, 2019, 12:22 AM   #20
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Good catch. 6.5x257 Roberts was a popular rechamber
Quote:
Ideally, yours is just a 7x57 necked down to 6.5 mm, ie the 6.5x57, for which both loaded ammo and brass is available.
6.5X57 and 6.5-257 Roberts ARE NOT the same cartridge. Close, but not the same. Same case length, but the steeper shoulder on the 6.5-257 Roberts makes the neck longer which makes it impossible to chamber the 6.5X57. There is only about .010" of difference in the case body length, but you cannot chamber 6.5X57 in a 6.5-257 Roberts chamber. I have recut about half a dozen over the years to 6.5X57, it takes about 15 minutes by hand (Arisaka barrels are tough).
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